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Will I get fired for a accident?

Topic 17698 | Page 1

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Butta's Comment
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I'm a rookie driver out with my trainer I jackknife in bad weather crossing over a bridge in Connecticut no one was hurt and no other vehicles were involved in the accident the load is ok minor damage to the trailer the truck is totalled I'm scared **** less wondering if I'm gonna get fired this is my first job

Kurt G.'s Comment
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I don't know, but it seems to me that if you were out with your trainer and he was in the other seat watching, then it would have a lot to do with what your trainer says.

In any case, do you know why it happened and how you could have prevented it? I think that's what you should tell them, and if you think you made a mistake don't leave that out. In any case, good luck

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hey Butta, welcome to the forum!

Dang boy, you sure know how to make a grand entrance!

When talking to your safety people be real careful about not laying the blame on the company's training, or pressure from your trainer, unless you can provide a recording of him giving you bad advice.

This is the time to own your responsibility and lay out the argument that you are a total newbie who has never driven a tractor trailer in the snow and ice before, and you are sorry but just didn't know how to handle the situation properly. Try to explain the lesson you learned, which was to shut down and take a break during really bad weather.

Chances are that they are going to have some questions for the trainer.

Which company are you training with?

Last winter we had a couple of rookies in here with Prime who both jack knifed their rigs on the same day, and same icy section of road. They both kept their jobs.

G-Town's Comment
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Glad that no one was injured.

Prepare for the worst and hope for the best. Cooperate with safety to the best of your ability.

Difficult to guess what they will do.

Butta's Comment
member avatar

Hey Butta, welcome to the forum!

Dang boy, you sure know how to make a grand entrance!

When talking to your safety people be real careful about not laying the blame on the company's training, or pressure from your trainer, unless you can provide a recording of him giving you bad advice.

This is the time to own your responsibility and lay out the argument that you are a total newbie who has never driven a tractor trailer in the snow and ice before, and you are sorry but just didn't know how to handle the situation properly. Try to explain the lesson you learned, which was to shut down and take a break during really bad weather.

Chances are that they are going to have some questions for the trainer.

Which company are you training with?

Last winter we had a couple of rookies in here with Prime who both jack knifed their rigs on the same day, and same icy section of road. They both kept their jobs.

I drive with Western express thanks for the advice

Butta's Comment
member avatar

Glad that no one was injured.

Prepare for the worst and hope for the best. Cooperate with safety to the best of your ability.

Difficult to guess what they will do.

OK thanks

Butta's Comment
member avatar

I don't know, but it seems to me that if you were out with your trainer and he was in the other seat watching, then it would have a lot to do with what your trainer says.

In any case, do you know why it happened and how you could have prevented it? I think that's what you should tell them, and if you think you made a mistake don't leave that out. In any case, good luck

Thanks from hindsight I think I shouldn't of been out there.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Butta, are you pulling a flat bed load of copper? I used to run that load often when I was at Western Express.

I'll tell you this. I worked a good while for Western Express and I saw new guys tear the tops of trucks off on low bridges that kept their jobs. Just own your mistake and explain what you learned. Hopefully you will get a second chance.

Mr M's Comment
member avatar

Your trainer should be fired for not instructing you to slow down

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Jackknife - Bad Weather - Bridge - CT.

Sounds like BLACK ICE to me.

As previous folks have asked - was your trainer riding up front in the passenger seat with you?

Your trainer should be fired for not instructing you to slow down

Probably wouldn't go all THAT FAR. We still don't know if the trainer was up front with him (trainee on a permit) or in the sleeper.

It is still ultimately the drivers decision, whether they are comfortable driving in adverse weather conditions - ESPECIALLY FOLKS IN TRAINING. There's no harm in telling your trainer driver, that you just aren't comfortable with driving in the current condition.

OTOH - you can't shut down at the first snowflake either. Trucks run in all kinds of weather - and that means 12 months a year. Driving in adverse conditions with a trainer beside you, is the perfect time to get a feel for how it's done, and when it's prudent to shut down.

Bridges can ice up on a clear day, without blizzard conditions. Hence the signs "Bridge Ices Before Roadway". Cold air under the bridge means the road surface of the bridge is going to be significantly colder - than the rest of the road surfaces. Which is why they ICE FIRST.

PLEASE DO KEEP US POSTED ON HOW THINGS PROGRESS FOR YOU.

Rick

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