TruckingTruth logo

Are the modern International Lonestars and Lonestar eagles good trucks?

Topic 20672 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

I have looked at trucks a lot through out the years and I have to admit I liked Freightliner until they changed ip their design with the Cascadia and then now that I am.driving it I like how much room it has. One other truck other than Peterbilt and Kenworth that I like the design and all is the International Lonestar. I have heard just like Freightliner that they are good and then some say they are junk. Could some of you clear up the dust on this topic thanks.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

They're not a bad truck. Interior wise, they're a step up from a Pro Star but aside from a couple small improvements are identical. It has a long hood and the front axle it set farther forward to achieve a more classic look and that's really about it to be honest. The 2017 and newer have the newest version of the Cummins which corrected some problems which plagued the previous version, mainly a sleeve issue in the cylinders which caused excessive oil consumption starting around 300k on average and usually led to an in frame rebuild which if you're lucky would be covered under warranty, otherwise, around a 20k investment. Are they the best truck? No, but they aren't terrible and can be found pretty cheap. The kicker would be on resale which the champion there is the W900 and has been for decades.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Ok cause that is something that I have thought about when I have 2-3 years experience going and going to invest in my company and I dont want junk at all. I am going to probably switch to Simbeck and Lord willing get my backing improved. Thats the reason why I was let go from Swift Transportation was that, now that I have 5 months experience and thats the only thing that absolutely PLAGUES me then I can go with this smaller company that can give more attention to my needs as a driver when it comes to training.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Victor, I was unaware that Swift let you go. What happened?

But seriously, you are getting let go by a company who is usually very lenient on their new drivers, so you think it would be a good idea to start your own trucking company? Victor you probably have read plenty of my commentary on the problems of being an owner operator. I can lay it all out fairly plain and clear, but I realize that some of us have got to learn things the hard way. But think about it... It is not a good plan for a guy who is having trouble keeping a job in an industry to just go out and start his own company so that he can stay in that industry. You are merely going to buy yourself a job, and that is never a good idea. The best way to start a business is to have a better idea than everybody else, or to have some revolutionary way of doing something or providing a service in a revolutionary way that becomes a game changer. In trucking you are just going to try and do the same thing that millions of others are trying to do. What in the world makes you think that you can do it better?

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

No Old School, I dont plan on starting my business until I have very good experience in trucking. I was merely suggesting that after a few more years of working UNDER somebody not start a company. Why would I even think of going and starting my company if I cant even get my backing perfected? Nay but I will submit myself to the wisdom and power of another campany in order to get more experience and perfect my skills. I think this was Gods way of moving me away from Swift and to a different company thats better suited for my needs. Like I still want to finish up my diploma studies which I dont have a whole lot more to do and I want to study Solid Works which is an engineers program I am wanting to learn.

On top of that I did mention a company named Simbeck. A company of 60 trucks and also my good friend works there and he will train me once I get there. They pay up tp 26% of the load, I will be home for the weekends for my 34 hour reset, closer home and they have new equipment. All dry van frieght and it would help me get good at one thing before I begin doing flatbed.

Does this help?

smile.gif

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Victor, to be honest your thinking is a mess.

Why would I even think of going and starting my company if I cant even get my backing perfected? I can go with this smaller company that can give more attention to my needs as a driver when it comes to training.

Really? You think a small company can afford to give you more time and attention toward becoming a decent driver than a large carrier like Swift who specializes in this sort of thing. No, it's quite the opposite. At a small company each driver is a much larger percentage of the overall workforce. Small companies need every driver to be far more efficient overall than a large company does.

And besides, you don't need more help from anyone. You've been driving for five months and from what little you've said it appears you've backed into too many things so they're letting you go. Am I right? Why haven't you been getting out to look? Why haven't you been more careful? No one can teach you that. You have to do that yourself. You have to have the awareness of what's going on to prevent backing into things. No amount of practice or instruction is going to make you safer. Safety is a discipline. Maintaining following distance, getting out to look when backing, watching your mirrors - all of that stuff. It's discipline. It's awareness.

I think this was Gods way of moving me away from Swift and to a different company thats better suited for my needs.

Don't blame God for your lousy backing skills and lack of discipline. No wonder there's been big hurricanes rolling through one after another. You're angering the Gods. Trust me, when God backs a trailer he gets out to look. Jesus would have kept his head on a swivel and watched his mirrors.

Getting fired from Swift wasn't God's way of letting you know anything. It was Swift's way of letting you know you're not learning. Take the responsibility on yourself to follow all safety procedures closely. In the meantime the rest of us will be praying that God watches out for the people parked next to you at truck stops.

Come on, man!

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Does this help?

No, not really.

But this made me chuckle...

Trust me, when God backs a trailer he gets out to look. Jesus would have kept his head on a swivel and watched his mirrors.

That should inspire you to take a whole new approach to backing. While backing your truck at this new company, keep in mind that silly little slogan that was popular among Christians several years back... "WWJD"

smile.gif

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Wow Victor, that seriously stinks. As you know I work for Swift, so I know their policies...if you flat-out can't back you would not have been upgraded to solo and/or your mentoring would have continued. I've seen it happen many times.

No sir. Victor there is only one way Swift will terminate for having difficulty backing;...you hit something, and likely had three such incidents within a very short span of time. I know for a fact they would have you attend a LCQT class if you were having difficulty, and/or if you happen to clip a trailer or stationary object. Swift is incredibly well equipped to support new drivers.

Short of hand-holding you and/or keeping you on a mentor's truck for a year, what else did you expect from them? Seriously, I am not trying to be a smart a**, what more do you need? Honestly Man, very sorry to hear of this...

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Well that all may be true from what you all said but on the flip side of that, I dont believe in the GODS I believe in one God and also I realize that these small companies are not going to have as much time to try and give me more time to "train" me but I was not blaming God but rather the opposite because I have been praying for God would give me guidance, wisdom, understanding, knowledge and prudence. Well about a month ago I felt that God was possibly telling me to quite Swift and finish up my diploma and then come back out to trucking again. Well I am not always the best at discerning Gods soft and gentle voice when He is trying to lead and I ended up staying and by the way I did GOAL and I did for the most part not hit anything but I realize that I also did bump a couple things and I admit to my fault with that.

I will not say you all are wrong but I sure as heck tried. Also to G-Town I did complete those classes just last week but they decided by that time to let me go. They didnt even give me a safety coaching class. By the way Brett you can say what you want but I will be honest no one tries as hard as I do to do a good job, sure I screwed up, but not a single one of us are PERFECT the first time around and 2nd I have a great friend who was in the first school I went to get my CDL who works at Simbeck who said that he would most likely be training me to be better at backing up and what not for a week and up to 4 weeks. I checked it out. Even called him. And quite honestly, I needed more time with my mentor he literally waited till last minute to try and get me 40 backs and we didnt get to it which would have helped a lot which 3rd I thought I was supposted to put in claims right as something happens and thought that we were supposed to put it in when we got to a terminal NO ONE told me to do.it right away so I looked really bad to them. SORRY I am not perfect at this yet give me a little room to breath. Like I said I am going to ADMIT to.my fault and MOVE on to bigger things.

I dont believe anything happens by chance. Cant say I didnt try and by the way I have not quite I just fell down but I dont QUITE I get back up and try to knock it out with a whopping 100% good backing and maneuvering that truck.

QUITTERS NEVER WIN. So I will get right back up again.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Victor wrote:

And quite honestly, I needed more time with my mentor he literally waited till last minute to try and get me 40 backs and we didnt get to it which would have helped a lot

Victor...do you recall my advice to you before you began the mentoring phase? I emphatically suggested that you own your training. And Blah, Blah, Blah, you came back like a frothing puppy stating how great that advice was. What good was it? You failed to heed the advice you thought was so great...

I also explained the importance of regular communication with your Driver Development Manager (DDM). You also understood that. I know for a fact, every DDM checks in on a regular basis with student drivers, worst case every 7-10 days. Why didn't you voice concern over your lack of backing at the point it became obvious your Mentor was sandbagging? You should have had the DDM's direct dial number, their cell number and the ability to send them a directed message through the QC so that your concern was DOCUMENTED.

My friend, this is on you and is diametrically opposed to my original suggestion. You did not "Own" your training, you went along with whatever the Mentor wanted to do, like a lemming and allowing their laziness to negatively affect your training quality.

Grow a set next time and speak up before it's too late. You knew "40 backs" is the minimum requirement and should be spread out over the duration of your Mentoring time. Five months in and you now state you didn't get enough backing practice? No wonder Swift terminated you. No excuse for this Victor...none.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel

Need help? We have instructions for sharing photos from photo sharing sites



example: http://www.truckingtruth.com/images/header.jpg
Submit
Cancel

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More