You People Don't Get It

Topic 10085 | Page 1

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:
Patrick 's Comment
member avatar

I drove for Navajo for 6 weeks and it ended 3 days ago, thinking it was going to last for several years. Everything was going great until my driver manager told me I had to get my miles up. I did not understand that statement, because in the three years I worked for Swift 10 years ago, they NEVER mentioned my monthly miles, as long as I picked up and delivered on time. Some loads don't require 400 miles every day of the month. But Navajo says if you don't put on 400 miles every day you are fired. That is not realistic.

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

By the way...

Who you callin' "you people???"

shocked.pngsmile.gif

The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar

I drove for Navajo for 6 weeks and it ended 3 days ago, thinking it was going to last for several years. Everything was going great until my driver manager told me I had to get my miles up. I did not understand that statement, because in the three years I worked for Swift 10 years ago, they NEVER mentioned my monthly miles, as long as I picked up and delivered on time. Some loads don't require 400 miles every day of the month. But Navajo says if you don't put on 400 miles every day you are fired. That is not realistic.

You're right, that doesn't sound realistic. It's not realistic that you couldn't turn more than 400 miles a day (as long as they're giving you the miles).

That's like what, 7 hours of driving a day? You know you have 11 available, right? You're basically leaving 4 hours of work/money on the table every day. Of course they're gonna have a problem with that. Get moving man!

It also doesn't sound realistic that they would fire you on the spot like this without any warning or other issues. Can you give us the whole story please?

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Ok before this turns into a forum enferno let's take a breath.

What were your monthly miles?

Listen, we already know there's a whole lot more to this story than you're saying right now. Is there more you can give us to help us understand the big picture? Nobody gets fired in their 6th week for not averaging 2,800 miles per week. I doubt half the trucks on the road average that. So you have to give us more to go on.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

If we don't "get it," it's because you're not filling in all the blanks. Forgive my skepticism, but there are holes big enough to parallel park an aircraft carrier in that story.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh Patrick, whenever I see a thread of yours I get so excited and just have to click it. You're just an absolutely legendary troll, you should write a guidebook.

The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

By the way...

Who you callin' "you people???"

shocked.pngsmile.gif

Jessica A-M's Comment
member avatar

Do truck drivers qualify as people now?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Patrick, you have established a long history with us for never telling us the truth. It makes it terribly difficult to offer anything constructive to you when we don't even know the boundaries we are working within.

Unfortunately you are to blame for becoming more of a form of entertainment for us than a fellow truck driver who is merely seeking some advice.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

Do truck drivers qualify as people now?

Last I heard, we were still classified as a semi-intelligent subspecies of fungus.

Get it? "Semi" intelligent? rofl-1.gifrofl-2.gifrofl-3.gif

I'll just show myself out now.

Patrick 's Comment
member avatar

I have done many loads that have been at least 1100 to 1500 miles loaded and empty total. Nobody ever said anything because I was delivering and picking up either on time or early. Then, out of the blue, while I am home my DM says that I have to get my miles up. I had no idea it was even a problem. I told her that I can drive 550 miles a day in order to get the load where it is going. I want to drive hard so I can have only a few miles to go on the day of delivery. But as far as how many miles I go every day of the month...............I don't care. As long as I pick up and deliver from the customer on time, I don't care how many miles I go. As long as I do it safely and legally. If those two things are ignored by the company then I don't take the load in the first place. With breakdowns, home time, delays for hours at the shipper and consignee , it is not reasonable to expect a driver to do 400 miles every single day. My DM told me she had some drivers who drive 700 miles every day. I told her that I would not believe that if the driver swore on a Bible. The governors on Navajo are set at 64. 700 miles including fueling, eating, taking the 30 minute break???? No, not reality at all. So I resigned while I was at home. I did not want to be a thousand miles away and be fired on the spot, and stranded. That is the entire story. If you don't believe it, call Navajo.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Navajo Express Choosing A Trucking Company Life On The Road
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More