Tad Nervous

Topic 11785 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Joshua R.'s Comment
member avatar

So, I am still really new to driving and went local/some linehaul right out of school. Because of that I drive solo right away and never had a trainer. Sunday i will be driving from washington to boise idaho and I am a bit nervous. I have never driven a big rig before a couple months ago (month of school and month with my current company) let alone through the mountains than snow, alone lol.... Any advice from the more experienced?

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

What company is this that will send a fresh student right out of school on to a trip across the country?

Joshua R.'s Comment
member avatar

From were i am in washington to boise is not really across the country. I have driven to boise multiple times in my pickup in the winter as i have family there. Just never in a combo vehicle like this. So I know the route really well. Also there will be 2 other drivers with thier trucks with me, 1 a prior cdl instructor and another really experienced guy. So not completely alone just nobody sittin next to me lol. Its just that 1 pass im nervouse about.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

So, I am still really new to driving and went local/some linehaul right out of school. Because of that I drive solo right away and never had a trainer. Sunday i will be driving from washington to boise idaho and I am a bit nervous. I have never driven a big rig before a couple months ago (month of school and month with my current company) let alone through the mountains than snow, alone lol.... Any advice from the more experienced?

Joshua I understand your angst. I cannot begin to tell you how irresponsible your employer is. Is this is your first time driving a loaded semi in mountainous terrain?

My only suggestion is to not force yourself to keep up with the other two drivers. You should drive at the speed you are comfortable with, not the speed they are going. If you happen to drive in wintery weather, use good judgment and again make decisions that you are comfortable with. Regardless of running with the other two experienced drivers, you and only you are responsible for your truck. It's your show...be smart.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Joshua R.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes g town this will be a first for me. I will heed your advice, I do that anyway lol. I drive normally around 55-60 mph sometimes 50 depending on weather. I try to be really safe, I stay a good wase away from the people in front of me. Trucks are always passin me lol. Im more worried about the varios downgrades through eastern washington and oregon. Going up im not worried. I just know that i dont want to screw up selecting the proper gear for the downgrades as i am not sure about using the jake in rainy/snowy weather and I dont want to burn up my brakes.

Justin (Jakebrake)'s Comment
member avatar

My best advise is what ever gear you climb in go two gears lower for the down grade do not use your jakes if there is snow on the ground that can end very badly for you and anyone around you, I use my trailer brake to slow me down when going down a mountain or steep grade when I can't use my jakes but be warned if you pull that to hard it will swing your trailer like a baseball bat I would ask one of the other drivers to run with you and let them know why you are uncomfortable and I'm sure they will help you out the best they can.

Carl A.'s Comment
member avatar

I know this reply might get some heat but may be not. I am just gonna come right out and say, DONT DO IT at this time. We can all come up with sound,good advice which is what most of us are wanting. You can get advice from the other drivers that you will be following or what ever the case may be however they will not be in the truck with you to help ,pretty much be on your owm. I am not trying to discourage but just like the one moderator ( that never answers his messages Lol) that said what company would send you out with the little training you have? Your life and your CDL is way more worth then what it appears this company is taking responsibilty for. Like I said Dont do it, unless they will send a experienced driver in the truck with you.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

I'm gonna side with the others on this one. I understand you're familiar with the road while driving your own vehicle but you're brand new in a big truck and now you're attempting a serious situation in possible winter weather. There's nothing wrong with being frosty, that extra awareness will help keep you safe but mountain training is a very important aspect of driver training, an aspect you weren't afforded. If you do decide to make the run, take your time, don't run out of your comfort zone and if the weather gets to a point where you don't feel safe, for gods sake pull over, it isn't worth the risk.

Joshua R.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, i made my decision after all of yalls adivice, and speaking with my grandpa who has driven most his life and my dad who currently drives I am not gonna do it. Unless they send me with an experienced driver and he drives through the mountains and I take over after I will not go. I may also be rethinking my company choice... If they are willing to try to get me to go like that, what else will they do? Your correct, it is irresponsible. Its down right stupid. Thank you all. This forum is great. Helped me stop and not make a dumb decision. As my dad said "the blue mountains in the winter with no training???!! Are you fricken stupid son!!! Hell no" lol

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Well, i made my decision after all of yalls adivice, and speaking with my grandpa who has driven most his life and my dad who currently drives I am not gonna do it. Unless they send me with an experienced driver and he drives through the mountains and I take over after I will not go. I may also be rethinking my company choice... If they are willing to try to get me to go like that, what else will they do? Your correct, it is irresponsible. Its down right stupid. Thank you all. This forum is great. Helped me stop and not make a dumb decision. As my dad said "the blue mountains in the winter with no training???!! Are you fricken stupid son!!! Hell no" lol

There are good companies out there, that will be happy to train you, and give you a great re-start, should you decide to part ways, too. Safety first, your life is more important than any job.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More