The Roundabouts Are Coming

Topic 11790 | Page 2

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SouthernJourneyman's Comment
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I like roundabouts if they're done properly. Some of them are just way too small for a big rig to be comfortable so you're going like 3 mph and you're constantly within a foot of running over top of something. When you can look out your driver's side window and read the writing on the side of the trailer you know you're in a tiny roundabout! And you're probably watching out the window as your tandems are climbing over top of the bushes or something.

smile.gif

This right here is the problem with most of our roundabouts. Went through a couple earlier this week. They were two lanes but so small that I took up both lanes and was still on the curb.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Serah D.'s Comment
member avatar

I truly don't understand the roundabouts here. I grew up in a country full of roundabouts and most in the cbd had and still have traffic lights. All are cross shaped/or like a small crossed t with a circle in the middle. The traffic lights (when working...lolol) ensure that drivers on each side are accorded equal time to use the roundabout.

Bad Bob's Comment
member avatar

Some roundabouts around here are indicating which lane to travel on in order to go to a certain exit. So sticking to the outside lane wouldn't work so well, as cars would probably bump into each other...lol

Yep, Vamp, you are right! That just makes them more of a problem for truckers. Imagine trying to see what's on the outside right side of you and having cars not even consider they are on your blind side. That just creates a whole lot more problems.

Bad Bob

Earl J.'s Comment
member avatar

But you'll notice it has a few bushes in the middle with a wide reddish ring around them and then the roadway around that. The reddish ring is red brick.

Started to laugh until I read the second sentence........thinking bullseye for trailer tires lol

RebelliousVamp 's Comment
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Meh. Just take all the space you need to go around. Crush a few cars, no problem. Not your fault if they want to race ya through the circle!! lolllll

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Reb-vamp observed

Some roundabouts around here are indicating which lane to travel on in order to go to a certain exit.

The ones in Hammond (like in the photo) are plenty big. Now in the photo the inner island has a big apron, so your tandems can roll up it without harm. These have two lanes, there wasn't all that much traffic the other day, so I just took up the whole traffic circle lanes to get around. Nobody seemed to complain.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

One of the things I hate about them is that when they are at a highway off ramp, that traffic never stops and you're 300yds down the way trying to pull out of the truck stop. Because of no light you wait forever for a break in the action.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

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This is a few blocks from where I live. I saw a Stevens Van Lines navigate this thing. I felt sorry for the driver, but he did ok. I could see him cussing up a storm, as i waited. It is barely big enough for my mini van to get around it comfortably.

RebelliousVamp 's Comment
member avatar

Oh my.....what a headache.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Josh S.'s Comment
member avatar

Other night in Kalamazoo Michigan I waited probably 5 minutes to have enough room to get out into the round about. It seemed like the cars were never going to stop coming

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