Petro In Joplin

Topic 12223 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Shiva's Comment
member avatar

So Tuesday will mark my first full week solo, since being upgraded after training. My backing is getting better. Although, I did have a little trouble getting into the angled parking spot last night, however, another driver helped by spotting me. I noticed a lot of trucks, at least 1/4-1/3 of all trucks went nose in. Some drivers even went as far as to create there own parking spaces, to avoid backing into a spot, even though there was plenty of spaces available. Why is that ?

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Some of it is just plain being lazy. As far as nosing in the angled spots, some drivers do it because they aren't that difficult to back out of and at that Petro, there's plenty of room to make the cut without fear of hitting something.

Weatherman's Comment
member avatar

Another reason drivers will nose into a parking spot is to get their cab away from a running reefer unit. Some drivers can't stand those things. I myself pulled reefers before my current tanker job and they didn't bother me at all. Always sleep with one of those Tornado Fans running and the truck idling.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar

Another reason drivers will nose into a parking spot is to get their cab away from a running reefer unit. Some drivers can't stand those things. I myself pulled reefers before my current tanker job and they didn't bother me at all. Always sleep with one of those Tornado Fans running and the truck idling.

So you're saying that in order to avoid the sound of a reefer, you should replace it with the sound of your own idling truck and a fan that's about 2 steps away from being a jet engine?

smile.gif

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

The two main reasons for nose-in parking have been discussed here. The big problem is you must have a full, straight in plus more space to line up and pull into the spot. If you have an angle set-up and pull in, when it's time to back out, who will steer the tandems for you?

Later in the night, when all the spots are full and more trucks show up, they will just park anywhere because their time is up. Some truck stops begin to look more like a trucker maze than a parking lot. This is from bad trip planning on their part. Rarely will truck stop operators or even cops go through and shew them away.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

The two main reasons for nose-in parking have been discussed here. The big problem is you must have a full, straight in plus more space to line up and pull into the spot. If you have an angle set-up and pull in, when it's time to back out, who will steer the tandems for you?

Later in the night, when all the spots are full and more trucks show up, they will just park anywhere because their time is up. Some truck stops begin to look more like a trucker maze than a parking lot. This is from bad trip planning on their part. Rarely will truck stop operators or even cops go through and shew them away.

Especially true for the roadside rest stops typical on Pennsylvania Interstates (the ones that require parallel parking)...by midnight they are gridlocked, everything is blocked except for the fortunate few with front-row spots. Trucks parked as if they were "litter". I only use them for 30 minute breaks, that way I can hightail it out before it before they get too congested.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

The two main reasons for nose-in parking have been discussed here. The big problem is you must have a full, straight in plus more space to line up and pull into the spot. If you have an angle set-up and pull in, when it's time to back out, who will steer the tandems for you?

Later in the night, when all the spots are full and more trucks show up, they will just park anywhere because their time is up. Some truck stops begin to look more like a trucker maze than a parking lot. This is from bad trip planning on their part. Rarely will truck stop operators or even cops go through and shew them away.

double-quotes-end.png

Especially true for the roadside rest stops typical on Pennsylvania Interstates (the ones that require parallel parking)...by midnight they are gridlocked, everything is blocked except for the fortunate few with front-row spots. Trucks parked as if they were "litter". I only use them for 30 minute breaks, that way I can hightail it out before it before they get too congested.

I laugh when they get so crowded that you see guys parking on the car side. I try to avoid them even for a 30, I'll take the next exit and sit on the on ramp first.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

G-Town says:

Especially true for the roadside rest stops typical on Pennsylvania Interstates (the ones that require parallel parking)...by midnight they are gridlocked, everything is blocked except for the fortunate few with front-row spots. Trucks parked as if they were "litter". I only use them for 30 minute breaks, that way I can hightail it out before it before they get too congested.

A while ago, I found an official document that basically covered the history of truck parking on interstates. The original truck parking areas were like those G-town describes - parallel spots for trucks. The document points out truckers hated the idea. Later more stops were built with the better pull through layout.

I can't remember where that document is posted, but it's an official US government document.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Shiva's Comment
member avatar

Good to know. Thanks guys

Phox's Comment
member avatar

Another reason some drivers park nose in is to protect their tractor from an accident. Which do you think is gonna cost more to repair and be a bigger problem... the front of your tractor... which has all those expensive engine parts... or the trailer which is just sheet metal, botls nuts and screws n stuff... ok axles and tires too but those prob won't be damaged as bad. Mostly a concern for lease and o/o but even as a company driver I would not be happy if my means of making money got damaged, the trailer can be replaced for much less. Also you might still be able to drive if the trailer gets hit... the truck... not as likely.

so some might do it to get away from reefer noise, other's are lazy and then the 3rd are those trying to protect their tractor. The last one also is a reason why some people park as far away from the services as they can, most rookie drivers (heck even I might at first) will want to be close to things like the bathrooms, showers, food, etc so they want those close spots but more experienced might value the tractor more so they park far away to reduce the risk of being hit.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More