Companies That Accept 6 Months Of Experience

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Daniel Sage's Comment
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Can you guys think of companies out there that are hiring people with AT LEAST 6 months of experience? Smaller the better. Just exploring my options, so far my main candidates are Marten, SRT, Navajo, and STS. I'm shying away from the companies that are also accepting recent grad's, but not ruling them out. I've only been off the throne for a few months and don't have any major accidents or tickets. Thanks!

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!
I'm shying away from the companies that are also accepting recent grad's, but not ruling them out. I've only been off the throne for a few months and don't have any major accidents or tickets. Thanks!

Okay, when I saw this get posted earlier today I decided I needed to check back later when I was finished driving because I had a bad feeling it was going to go downhill. Here I am parked in my customer's lot at 0300 blocking the four unloading bays with my flat-bed so that they have to unload me first thing in the morning before any of the dry-van drivers can get in position to be unloaded, and sure enough this thread has already gone south.

There is a big fallacy that is accepted among new drivers that says "these so called "starter companies" are okay places to get your start, but then you will need to move on to a "good" company so that you can make some money."

Most starter companies don't have good detention/stop/layover pay, because most of the fresh bodies aren't aware that plays a big role in your final pay.

Daniel, "detention/stop/layover pay" should never be considered to "play a big role in your final pay." Here I am, and I just looked over my last year's pay to see how many times I got any of those types of pay. Here's the big picture from an experienced guy who is considered, by his dispatcher , as one of the best in his fleet. I got layover pay once, and I got detention pay once. Out of 52 weeks of turning my wheels at close to 140,000 miles that type of pay was less than one percent of my total pay - and to be honest with you I didn't even ask for it, but my dispatcher insisted that I get it for some small disturbances in my schedule.

Daniel even admitted to what the real problem was when he stated:

I made lots of mistakes like getting stuck, missing and grinding gears, knocking over pallets....Little stuff, but it adds up, and costed the company money.

Drivers that are good don't make all those little mistakes, but it is very difficult for a new driver like Daniel to be proficient. That is exactly why we try to teach you guys/gals to stick with your first job for one year - it is just what it takes to start getting the feel for the job and the lifestyle. Everybody wants to put the cart before the horse in this business, and it is just so convoluted the way people think that if they can just get with the right company they will be making all kinds of money. The only way you are going to do well in this business is to develop some sense of what it takes to do the job in such a way so that you don't have to rely on all that "detention/stop/layover pay." There is a certain sense of being "road savvy" that will put you way ahead of the other drivers out here. That is why I pointed out at the beginning of this reply how I parked at this customer at three in the morning in such a way that no one else can get in here. There's going to be some drivers mad at me in the morning - not because I'm a PITA, but because they are going to realize that they got outsmarted by an old hand at this stuff. I will be the first one getting unloaded and therefore I will be the first one on my way to the next thing on my list. They will all be trying to get some detention pay from their dispatchers while I am out there turning some more miles making the real money.

Friends that is how it works out here, and if Daniel wants to make some really good money he has got to figure that out.

Companies that DON'T train have much less to worry about. In theory that means more money on the table for drivers.

That is so typical of the current thinking, and it just doesn't work that way. The producers are the ones that make the lion's share of the money, and each company has their own core group of drivers who are their "go to guys." It doesn't have anything to do with the company's business plan, or the fact that they train new drivers or not. It all has to do with the ability of the driver to produce consistently and efficiently. That is how it works out here.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Daniel Sage wrote in his last reply:

What's so funny about having 6 months of experience and wanting suggestions on companies? I don't get you guys. The whole point of this thread was to LIST COMPANIES that hire people with 6 months of experience. If we listed all the "newbie" companies too then it would be a super long list. Y'all are right, I'm a newbie. Let me know when that changes and I get my trophy. Thanks for standing up for me Kurt G. I know companies normally want that 1 year of experience, that's why this thread is relevant; because not everyone wants to stick out a year with a lousy company. Sorry veteran truckers; I'm rebelling against the magical 1 year mark. I'm sorry. Seeing as I can't take my resume with me when I die and don't plan driving trucks for forever; y'all can just regurgitate the values of job stability on some other thread. Thanks

There is nothing funny about six months experience. We have all been there. Only one reply mentioned anything about "laughing" at six months experience, only one. I read this entire thread and I think you actually got some sound advice along the way, sprinkled with perhaps some information that was not as helpful in your opinion. That's what these threads are all about. You read and digest what people wrote and you apply what is relevant and throw out the rest. Nothing personal but never do we tell you what you want to hear. In the end it's always your decision and regardless of what you think we all hope it turns out in your favor.

Just to be crystal clear, the values of job stability is not what is "regurgitated" here as you so eloquently wrote. You are missing the point. We believe and for very good reason, that if at all possible stick with your first truck driving job for one year. The facts overwhelmingly support this. It's not about stability, but experience, learning and gaining it with a company best suited for developing entry level drivers.

Daniel, your original post was as follows:

Can you guys think of companies out there that are hiring people with AT LEAST 6 months of experience? Smaller the better. Just exploring my options, so far my main candidates are Marten, SRT, Navajo, and STS. I'm shying away from the companies that are also accepting recent grad's, but not ruling them out. I've only been off the throne for a few months and don't have any major accidents or tickets.

Daniel, what you are really looking for is a company that will hire a driver with six months experience, not currently employed (possibly terminated) and hasn't driven a truck for a "few" months (2-3, only you really know). Did I get that correct or did I miss something? The last sentence in your original post is quite telling and unfortunately shrinks your list down to zero unless you are willing to go through road training all over again with a company that may only hire newbies.

My sincere advice is start applying (if you want to continue in this business) and be brutally honest with the recruiters because whatever occurred at your first job is documented and readily available to any future employer. Someone will take a chance on you, but due to your situation, your choices are possibly the same as if you just got your CDL. Maybe not what you want to hear, sorry but it's reality.

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Joseph D.'s Comment
member avatar

Have you tried Craigslist? I found a lot of companies (usually smaller) that may hire with little experience. Though I do live near Chicago and their is a good amount of transport companies in my area.

Daniel Sage's Comment
member avatar

Have you tried Craigslist? I found a lot of companies (usually smaller) that may hire with little experience. Though I do live near Chicago and their is a good amount of transport companies in my area.

Yea, I check CL frequently, also, Indeed, Monster, careerbuilder. Just trying to find some of those smaller companies that aren't necessarily blasting themselves out there because they don't NEED too. Catch my drift?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
RebelliousVamp 's Comment
member avatar

Just curious....why do you not want to work for someone who hire recent grads? Were you not there too, at some point? lol (just want to know the reasoning behind your choice...)

James R.'s Comment
member avatar

Companies that don't hire recent grads tend to pay more or have more perks because their is significant cost in training and keeping new drivers.

J Johns's Comment
member avatar

Companies that don't hire recent grads tend to pay more or have more perks because their is significant cost in training and keeping new drivers.

Exactly. Same principle as small buy-here-pay-here dealerships. They charge far higher interest because they operate with a much higher rate of customer default. They build it into their business model. That's why frugal people never buy that way.

Daniel Sage's Comment
member avatar

Exactly. Most starter companies don't have good detention/stop/layover pay, because most of the fresh bodies aren't aware that plays a big role in your final pay. It really took that whole six months before I was really comfortable out there, and I made lots of mistakes like getting stuck, missing and grinding gears, knocking over pallets....Little stuff, but it adds up, and costed the company money. Companies that DON'T train have much less to worry about. In theory that means more money on the table for drivers. Plus reefer kind of sucked lol

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Bolt's Comment
member avatar

So we're you let go at your last company or did you quit? That will play a big part in getting another job.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!
I'm shying away from the companies that are also accepting recent grad's, but not ruling them out. I've only been off the throne for a few months and don't have any major accidents or tickets. Thanks!

Okay, when I saw this get posted earlier today I decided I needed to check back later when I was finished driving because I had a bad feeling it was going to go downhill. Here I am parked in my customer's lot at 0300 blocking the four unloading bays with my flat-bed so that they have to unload me first thing in the morning before any of the dry-van drivers can get in position to be unloaded, and sure enough this thread has already gone south.

There is a big fallacy that is accepted among new drivers that says "these so called "starter companies" are okay places to get your start, but then you will need to move on to a "good" company so that you can make some money."

Most starter companies don't have good detention/stop/layover pay, because most of the fresh bodies aren't aware that plays a big role in your final pay.

Daniel, "detention/stop/layover pay" should never be considered to "play a big role in your final pay." Here I am, and I just looked over my last year's pay to see how many times I got any of those types of pay. Here's the big picture from an experienced guy who is considered, by his dispatcher , as one of the best in his fleet. I got layover pay once, and I got detention pay once. Out of 52 weeks of turning my wheels at close to 140,000 miles that type of pay was less than one percent of my total pay - and to be honest with you I didn't even ask for it, but my dispatcher insisted that I get it for some small disturbances in my schedule.

Daniel even admitted to what the real problem was when he stated:

I made lots of mistakes like getting stuck, missing and grinding gears, knocking over pallets....Little stuff, but it adds up, and costed the company money.

Drivers that are good don't make all those little mistakes, but it is very difficult for a new driver like Daniel to be proficient. That is exactly why we try to teach you guys/gals to stick with your first job for one year - it is just what it takes to start getting the feel for the job and the lifestyle. Everybody wants to put the cart before the horse in this business, and it is just so convoluted the way people think that if they can just get with the right company they will be making all kinds of money. The only way you are going to do well in this business is to develop some sense of what it takes to do the job in such a way so that you don't have to rely on all that "detention/stop/layover pay." There is a certain sense of being "road savvy" that will put you way ahead of the other drivers out here. That is why I pointed out at the beginning of this reply how I parked at this customer at three in the morning in such a way that no one else can get in here. There's going to be some drivers mad at me in the morning - not because I'm a PITA, but because they are going to realize that they got outsmarted by an old hand at this stuff. I will be the first one getting unloaded and therefore I will be the first one on my way to the next thing on my list. They will all be trying to get some detention pay from their dispatchers while I am out there turning some more miles making the real money.

Friends that is how it works out here, and if Daniel wants to make some really good money he has got to figure that out.

Companies that DON'T train have much less to worry about. In theory that means more money on the table for drivers.

That is so typical of the current thinking, and it just doesn't work that way. The producers are the ones that make the lion's share of the money, and each company has their own core group of drivers who are their "go to guys." It doesn't have anything to do with the company's business plan, or the fact that they train new drivers or not. It all has to do with the ability of the driver to produce consistently and efficiently. That is how it works out here.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

As usual, Old School tells it like it is. Something else I noticed, you say you're looking for smaller companies yet all those you have listed are large companies lol. Plus the claim that you want a company that isn't hiring newbies yet for all intents and purposes, you're still a newbie. Smaller, say 20-30 truck companies look for drivers with much more experience and verifiable driving records. A lot of them run nice equipment and some take a lot of pride in that equipment. Their trucks may have more power, run higher speeds or just have all the bells and whistles. No matter what the case may be, they look for seasoned drivers who they feel they can trust with high priced vehicles. With only 6 months under your belt, you really don't fit that standard just yet. Keep up the good work as a safe and solid driver and build that reputation. In no time at all, you'll be ready to approach that small company running the fleet of super shiny W9's or the Pete's that are decked out with everything stainless. In some senses it's a rite of passage, unless you have a couple hundred thousand to spec one out yourself.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

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