ABS Light

Topic 12382 | Page 1

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Shiva's Comment
member avatar

I've been sitting at a truck stop in Oklahoma City since 3 pm yesterday. Temperature has been below freezing. Idled my truck all night. Went in to shower this morning, so I turned truck off. When I came back to the truck, started it again. Now my ABS Light is on. Could the freezing temperature play a factor ? Gotta deliver to a Sam dc in the morning

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Tractor or trailer?

If tractor then there could be many reasons. When that's happened to me it's always been a sensor.

If trailer, cut the wire leading to the ABS light so dot doesn't see. Then take it to a terminal for repair.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

It will most likely go out when you start driving. I've had alot of experience with that one. Mechanics can't seem to explain it but sometimes heat and cold extremes can cause it then once you start moving it goes out. there is a sensor connected to the light. Excessive dust can cause it too. If it doesn't go out within about 1 mile get it checked

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

Tractor or trailer?

If tractor then there could be many reasons. When that's happened to me it's always been a sensor.

If trailer, cut the wire leading to the ABS light so dot doesn't see. Then take it to a terminal for repair.

You would be better served to just unplug the light rather than cutting it.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Tractor or trailer?

If tractor then there could be many reasons. When that's happened to me it's always been a sensor.

If trailer, cut the wire leading to the ABS light so dot doesn't see. Then take it to a terminal for repair.

double-quotes-end.png

You would be better served to just unplug the light rather than cutting it.

On our trailers getting that light in and out is a royal pain. Easier and faster to just chop chop.

smile.gif

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Tractor or trailer?

If tractor then there could be many reasons. When that's happened to me it's always been a sensor.

If trailer, cut the wire leading to the ABS light so dot doesn't see. Then take it to a terminal for repair.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

You would be better served to just unplug the light rather than cutting it.

double-quotes-end.png

On our trailers getting that light in and out is a royal pain. Easier and faster to just chop chop.

smile.gif

A little trick to that is to remove the rubber and clean it off really good then you do two things. One you submerge the rubber piece in hot water to soften it up and 2 spray it off on the inside with wd40. Our trailers are like that too. I don't know what it is about the rear corner marker lights but they all seem to be like that. All the rest of the marker light, no problem.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

murderspolywog's Comment
member avatar

If it's freezing I can forom on the sensors it dose off when you stay driving. Also make sheer The wires are not in contact with something, could be cousing a short I have had that happen to.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

I'd go with Pat's advice and just unplug it. A light coming unplugged is much easier to explain that one which was clearly cut. DOT isn't stupid and they've seen both but they'll hammer you harder about it being cut and it's a pretty hefty fine for intentionally disabling a safety warning item.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Shiva's Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys, probably will unplug it if it doesn't go out after I start driving

Turbo Dan's Comment
member avatar

Is it the Trailer Back warning light staying on or the Dash warning light, try to Isolate as the Trailer has it's own ABS computer. Like someone else said try driving in the yard, you need to go 10 mph+ for some distance to reset the computers. Next if it's safe in the yard try unplugging the 7 pin power cable to the trailer and do the rolling test again to see if the Tractor dash light goes out.

If the dash warning light goes out, then the problem's in the Trailer,,, If it stays on, it's in the Tractor. What I've seen in cold weather is moisture gets into the Aluminum sensor mount and Freezes, cracking apart dropping the wheel speed sensor loose in the Brake assembly, breaking it's wires.

If it's the tractor, you could pull the tractor's ABS fuse to dissable the dash light, first problem is when you start the engine is the truck goes thru a self test,, if everything is working properly then the trailer warning light will come on during the self test then go Out,, as will the tractor dash come on the go out. Second Problem is a smart DOT inspector will know this also and know if the ABS system has been dissabled $$$

I'm not advocating dissabling the ABS warning system as that's against the LAW,,, Just trying to help you understand how I would trouble shoot the problem,,, yes I do have a Brake Inspector Card,,, Dan

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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