Garmin Vs Rand Mcnally

Topic 12392 | Page 1

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Chris Jones ( MonkeyBone's Comment
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What's your preference

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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What's your preference

The Rand McNally atlas, a pen, and paper. And then I will use the Qualcomm one, too.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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What's your preference

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The Rand McNally atlas, a pen, and paper. And then I will use the Qualcomm one, too.

These first, then the Garmin Dezl.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
The Persian Conversion's Comment
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I've tried both. In my experience, Garmin is like a Mac, and Rand McNally is like a PC. Take that however you want.

PJ's Comment
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I have Rand and it works well, however you have to subscribe to traffic and run it over wifi. I understand garmin provides it and no wifi needed. Of course it's only an additional tool and is not always right

Thomas S.'s Comment
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I have a Garmin and I do like it but I have found Google Maps on my phone to be more reliable. Sometimes my Garmin tells me it cant find the address I type in and sometimes it takes me a less desirable route. What I do like about the Garmin is it telling me how many miles to my destination, informs me when I'm 5 miles from the next state border or scale house and it displays the speed limit which is handy when you get off the interstate. I use the Garmin mostly on the highway with map verification and then compare it with Google maps and directions I get from the customer.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Jim E.'s Comment
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Not familiar with Garmin, but have Rand Tablet and before that a Cobra 7600 Pro. The Cobra was garbage. The tablet has a lot of good features for owner-ops, but for $500, I expected better NAV. For instance, for giggles I entered a Walmart that was just one exit up from where I had parked right off Rte 94 in WI. A quick turn onto the freeway, up one exit, and the Walmart was right there on the right. But the Rand presented a route that would have taken me three miles through back local farm roads. :-!! It doesn't do that often, but enough times to be a pain in the ass. I like its large 8" screen much better over the smaller ones, but the audio speaker is cheap, sounds distorted and not clear, like an old brittle and cracked speaker. I got a cheap, dash-mounted external plug-in speaker that made all the difference. A driver and good friend of mine has the high-end Garmin, and he swears by it, after having a low-end Rand and Cobra models. What's your preference

mountain girl's Comment
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From experience, I can tell you Rand is not good once you get into the Denver-Metro area. Nay-NAY. Don't do it. As a P & D driver, it was nearly disastrous, even with a day-cab and pup. While I like the Rand itself, there is so much construction around Denver and so many "frontage" roads and strip malls, etc., that I do not recommend it once you've arrived here.

I've used Garmin for my personal vehicle and a lot of P&D drivers use it successfully, but one time I got back into my car and it had lost its seal on the windshield, fallen and hit the steering wheel on the way down, and once the screen was cracked, it was useless.

I subscribe to AT&T's Telenav, live navigation system. While they add the monthly fee of $9.99 to my cell phone bill, to me, it's worth the piece of mind to have a system that I can rely on, with up-to-date traffic warnings and alternate routes. I don't buy a lot of "extras" in life, so reduced blood-pressure and better stress-management costs $120 per year. Big deal. I need it. I could spend more money in one month on designer coffee every day, than that. You can also download it try it out, for a day, for less than $2. I believe they offer a first month free trial, too but if you don't like it, you have to be sure you've severed your contract before they auto-renew and charge you on the 30th day.

One of the things I like about it the most, is that the audio goes straight from my phone to my BlueParrot, so I'm getting turn-by-turn directions going straight to my head, hands free. If I need to turn up the volume, whatever, I only have to reach for the buttons next to my ear and I can leave my phone untouched while driving. If I am talking on the phone while driving, it will interrupt the conversation to give me directions, but the other person on the line won't hear them. It's been the best system for me.

-mountain girl

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P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

P & D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Scott M's Comment
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I subscribe to AT&T's Telenav, live navigation system. While they add the monthly fee of $9.99 to my cell phone bill, to me, it's worth the piece of mind to have a system that I can rely on, with up-to-date traffic warnings and alternate routes. I don't buy a lot of "extras" in life, so reduced blood-pressure and better stress-management costs $120 per year. Big deal. I need it. I could spend more money in one month on designer coffee every day, than that. You can also download it try it out, for a day, for less than $2. I believe they offer a first month free trial, too but if you don't like it, you have to be sure you've severed your contract before they auto-renew and charge you on the 30th day.

-mountain girl

MG- The web address below shows it working on an Android- Samsung phone. Does it work on an iPhone?

Telenav Track from AT&T GPS Navigation Gives mobile workers visual and audible turn-by-turn driving directions with automatic re-route so they drive fewer miles:

Info from: https://www.wireless.att.com/businesscenter/solutions/industry-solutions/mobile-productivity-solutions/telenav-track.jsp

Skar Hed's Comment
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I have a Rand McNally 530 for about 18 months, it's the only GPS I have ever bought, I like the features, or am satisfied and accustomed to them, but have nothing to compare it to. But as a piece of hardware, as an appliance, it is an absolute piece of junk. I have exchanged it twice for a replacement model.

I expect this third one to completely fail eventually. Meanwhile the screen will freeze up now and then, on off switch won't work, it will get stuck in 3d view, it will change skins and settings all by itself, it won't charge with anything but the charger that comes with it, which is also a piece of junk, it won't charge with the charger plugged too far in, or too far out, it has to be juuuust right, it will routinely delay for thirty or forty seconds to execute the simplest request...I can't even remember all the ways this GPS has annoyed the crap out of me. If I could get even a third of the cash back on it I would take it and buy the cheapest Garmin truck GPS for 100 bucks or so. Find out how crummy THEY might be.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

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