Training Question

Topic 12734 | Page 1

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Nathan G.'s Comment
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I leave for training in less then 12 hrs. I have to do 4 weeks of class and 4 to 5 weeks with mentor. I am not nervous about class I already have permit. My biggest thing is getting into a truck with someone I don't know. My biggest thing is what if my mentor and I can't get along? What happens then? I am the type of person that can get along with anyone. Do I have the option to get a new mentor or am I stuck with one?

Scott O.'s Comment
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Yes you can ask for a new one but it will slow your training down... Look at the big picture its only a couple weeks then you're on your own...try to make it work if you can't then ask for a new trainer

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Normally yes, you'll have the option of switching trainers if things aren't going well for you guys. But listen, I think people worry a little too much about this. I mean, we'd all love for training to be with this great, fun guy who makes it like a Trucking Fantasy Camp where everyone gets their dream tour of the country but training is super stressful and difficult much of the time regardless of the trainer you have. Overall you'll find that most trainers are just fine though. There are a few that are less than desirable for one reason or another and some are just complete jerks. It happens. But it's only for a short time anyhow. No big deal.

I always advise people to approach the beginning of your trucking career like you would the army where everyone is going to treat you as horribly as they possibly can for quite a long time. You know it's coming, you expect it, and you prepare yourself mentally to endure it, not to avoid it or fear it. You go in there with the attitude that you're going to face whatever challenges they throw your way and stay focused on the end goal of completing the training.

Try to relax, focus on the moment at hand, and try not to overwhelm yourself asking "what if?" all the time about potential problems you might face. All you can really do right now is keep studying the training materials to improve your knowledge base and focus on maintaining positive thoughts and a great attitude. Go in there expecting to have some ups and downs along the way. Expect to meet a few jerks you'd rather not deal with. Expect some really stressful situations where you feel like you're in over your head. Those are the norm for everyone during training. It's not easy, but it's totally doable.

Stay focused on your goals, accept every challenge head on, get along with everyone, and do everything with a smile - that's the approach to take. This is a huge opportunity and it's hopefully a super exciting time in your life. I know for me it sure was! Don't let anyone or anything dampen your enthusiasm and just keep moving forward one moment at a time.

Go get em!

smile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Shiva's Comment
member avatar

Normally yes, you'll have the option of switching trainers if things aren't going well for you guys. But listen, I think people worry a little too much about this. I mean, we'd all love for training to be with this great, fun guy who makes it like a Trucking Fantasy Camp where everyone gets their dream tour of the country but training is super stressful and difficult much of the time regardless of the trainer you have. Overall you'll find that most trainers are just fine though. There are a few that are less than desirable for one reason or another and some are just complete jerks. It happens. But it's only for a short time anyhow. No big deal.

I always advise people to approach the beginning of your trucking career like you would the army where everyone is going to treat you as horribly as they possibly can for quite a long time. You know it's coming, you expect it, and you prepare yourself mentally to endure it, not to avoid it or fear it. You go in there with the attitude that you're going to face whatever challenges they throw your way and stay focused on the end goal of completing the training.

Try to relax, focus on the moment at hand, and try not to overwhelm yourself asking "what if?" all the time about potential problems you might face. All you can really do right now is keep studying the training materials to improve your knowledge base and focus on maintaining positive thoughts and a great attitude. Go in there expecting to have some ups and downs along the way. Expect to meet a few jerks you'd rather not deal with. Expect some really stressful situations where you feel like you're in over your head. Those are the norm for everyone during training. It's not easy, but it's totally doable.

Stay focused on your goals, accept every challenge head on, get along with everyone, and do everything with a smile - that's the approach to take. This is a huge opportunity and it's hopefully a super exciting time in your life. I know for me it sure was! Don't let anyone or anything dampen your enthusiasm and just keep moving forward one moment at a time.

Go get em!

smile.gif

Brett, what if you're stuck with a negative, racist, ###hole, who looks up and encourages you to find another company to work for after training is completed. I almost got off my trainer's truck 3 times cuz of that. But I was "looking at the bigger picture". I'm glad I completed training. However, if I never see my trainer again, it will be to soon

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Brett, what if you're stuck with a negative, racist, ###hole, who looks up and encourages you to find another company to work for after training is completed. I almost got off my trainer's truck 3 times cuz of that. But I was "looking at the bigger picture". I'm glad I completed training. However, if I never see my trainer again, it will be to soon

I think you answered your own question. You kept the bigger picture in mind, you stayed focused on your goals, and you persevered. Of course it sucked, no question about it.

But I believe if you want to make a living doing something that's risky and challenging then you have to be willing and able to suck it up and make the best of bad circumstances. If you can only perform under ideal circumstances then you're going to get crushed as soon as you get out on the road because it's almost never ideal, am I right? In fact, you're often facing life and death circumstances in high mountains, heavy traffic, blinding snowstorms, and huge cities. You're away from home for days or weeks at a time, your sleep patterns are completely random, you're on a tight schedule all the time, it's brutally stressful on a daily basis, and almost every day out there is exhausting.

I have no problem with someone asking for a new trainer if they get stuck with a lousy one. I would probably do the same myself though fortunately I was never in that circumstance. But if you have to suck it up and stick it out then that's what you do. Difficult circumstances are part of everyday life in this industry and for some people that includes getting a trainer with a horrible personality. At least make the best of it by learning all you can. Even a jerk can pass on information that will save you a lot of grief and make you a better driver.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Shiva's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Brett, what if you're stuck with a negative, racist, ###hole, who looks up and encourages you to find another company to work for after training is completed. I almost got off my trainer's truck 3 times cuz of that. But I was "looking at the bigger picture". I'm glad I completed training. However, if I never see my trainer again, it will be to soon

double-quotes-end.png

I think you answered your own question. You kept the bigger picture in mind, you stayed focused on your goals, and you persevered. Of course it sucked, no question about it.

But I believe if you want to make a living doing something that's risky and challenging then you have to be willing and able to suck it up and make the best of bad circumstances. If you can only perform under ideal circumstances then you're going to get crushed as soon as you get out on the road because it's almost never ideal, am I right? In fact, you're often facing life and death circumstances in high mountains, heavy traffic, blinding snowstorms, and huge cities. You're away from home for days or weeks at a time, your sleep patterns are completely random, you're on a tight schedule all the time, it's brutally stressful on a daily basis, and almost every day out there is exhausting.

I have no problem with someone asking for a new trainer if they get stuck with a lousy one. I would probably do the same myself though fortunately I was never in that circumstance. But if you have to suck it up and stick it out then that's what you do. Difficult circumstances are part of everyday life in this industry and for some people that includes getting a trainer with a horrible personality. At least make the best of it by learning all you can. Even a jerk can pass on information that will save you a lot of grief and make you a better driver.

Brett, you are right. I did learn a lot from my trainer. I use the knowledge that I got from his training every day. I have my classmates calling me almost every day asking me how to do stuff. Of course I help them. But I think to myself, did your trainer NOT teach you this ? Also, did you NOT ask questions. How do think I learned. From observing and asking questions.

Scott M's Comment
member avatar

Just talked to a Schneider driver for 2 years. About his trainer- stunk. He said he put up with it but that was the worst experience he had during training. He was surprised- it was nice that his trainer had a bunch of free showers saved for him to use. But he wondered why didn't the trainer use them. He was a mechanic in my home town, now he's the school bus barn manager. Real good man.

I trained at Prime, we took showers every other day. No complaints.

murderspolywog's Comment
member avatar

The what ifs in this job will drive you crazy. Learn to adapt and overcome the problems, as they come. Remember also that the trainer is letting you come into there home and sharing it with you. He doesn't know you at all. This can be stressful for them as well. Training is stressful, just remember its only 4 weeks and it will be done sooner than you think. I am a swift mentor. Good luck out there.

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