Family Riders/passengers

Topic 1302 | Page 3

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Truckinrooke_Andrew's Comment
member avatar

I know it's an old thread but I'm considering taking a regional job, I've had my cdl for almost 2 years but only spent about 2 months driving a dump truck. I'm planning to take my wife with me on the road but here's the question / dilemma: In 6 months we will be having a baby... wondering if anyone has taken a newborn on the road (my wife will not be driving will be only taking care of the baby) legality, practicality, let's work with the assumption that the company is ok with it and the insurance isn't an issue (still working on getting those details figured out but don't need any advise on that) Does the child need to be in a car seat all the time? Sleeper with a net? Has anyone actually done this? Recently? Any and all advise is much appreciated

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
let's work with the assumption that the company is ok with it and the insurance isn't an issue

Welcome aboard Sir!

I am not sure you can work off of those assumptions. Just about any company I know of has an age limit for the riders, and I have never seen them allowing infants on board. I could be wrong, but I have never seen that anywhere.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Truckinrooke_Andrew's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

let's work with the assumption that the company is ok with it and the insurance isn't an issue

double-quotes-end.png

Welcome aboard Sir!

I am not sure you can work off of those assumptions. Just about any company I know of has an age limit for the riders, and I have never seen them allowing infants on board. I could be wrong, but I have never seen that anywhere.

It is a smaller operation, less than 10 trucks and a family friend owns it, if by chance I could get autherization, would it even be legal? Reading forums and blogs across the Internet I've seen a few people do it but I want to make sure I'm 100% legal. I can't aford any fudge factor as a rookie driver with a less than perfect driving record.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

I'm going to avoid reading the comments and just tell you my personal experience. I started going with my dad on trips when I was probably 8. We didn't get a lot of time to do stuff he enjoyed which at that age I wanted to enjoy also. So riding in the truck with him on a few trips here and there are some of the best childhood memories I.have. I absolutely loved it and still do. The only downside I see at this point in my life is knowing I had so.much fun and destroying my memories if I decide to start driving and its not everything I thought of it.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar
It is a smaller operation, less than 10 trucks and a family friend owns it, if by chance I could get autherization, would it even be legal?

I honestly do not know the answer to that question. Hopefully someone with more knowledge about the legalities of that will respond.

To me, you have bigger issues to face here. Earlier you made this statement...

I've had my cdl for almost 2 years but only spent about 2 months driving a dump truck.

Starting your career, which is basically what you are doing here, at a company with ten trucks is not exactly the best way to go about this. I'm not even sure your family friend can get you covered under their insurance without being dishonest about your level of experience. I would like to see you spend some time reading some of the many pages of information we have for getting a trucking career underway. I am certain you will learn some things if you will take the time to go through our Truck Driver's Career Guide.

Have you considered what would happen if you had a couple of small fender benders while working at this friends company? Would they be able to keep you on? We have had countless folks come through here who wanted to start their trucking careers in ways that were not exactly well established paths to success. It is very disheartening to see them fall by the way side because they ignored good solid advice on how to get started. Most of the larger companies who provide Paid CDL Training Programs have a vested interest in your success, and are therefore both willing, and financially able, to put up with a few bumps along they way until you become more proficient at this. Often times the folks who start out with a small operation end up being dismissed after an accident and then are unable to find employment elsewhere.

I would say that a much better approach for you to take would be to commit to one year of driving for a large national carrier as an Over The Road driver, and then make the transition to your friend's smaller company. But even at that I don't see anyone allowing you to bring an infant along with you. Of course you could become an Owner/Operator and do that, but that is really putting the cart before the horse more so than you already are now - I do not recommend that at all.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Matt 's Comment
member avatar

So I went and read some of the recent comments which probably bumped this up. And from what I am reading please correct me if I am wrong. This is your first child? I understand the desire to what you are talking about as I'm in the family separation delima also. However being a father of four I say give it a couple months before even worrying about them going with you. Company stuff aside you will find fears you didn't know existed when the baby is born and the best place to be with a newborn is at home. Shower,running water, temp control and being able to hear things probably top my list of reasons and access to a doctor or hospital. I could go on but thats just my 2 cents

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

At least in a car an infant/baby/toddler must be strapped into an approved baby seat at all times. I don't see how it could be any different in a truck.

Legality and potential insurability issues aside, you will have your hands full the first few months learning how to operate your truck safely and efficiently. Under the best of circumstances the first few months is very challenging. Add the additional distraction and responsibility of your wife and the new baby, and your learning curve just got a whole lot steeper with higher risk. This is a job...a very difficult one and not the lifestyle supportive to the development of a newborn baby.

I am a father of three and now a grandfather. With all due respect, spend quality time with your family during your home time breaks. Having the baby in the truck 24x7 is nothing remotely close to quality time.

murderspolywog's Comment
member avatar

I would love to take my wife and kid with me she is 2 and my wife will be have a second baby in August. With the poor quality of the roads in the U.S. with having to have the kids restrained for 8 to 10 hours a day. With that lack of control a new born has over there head, I would be scarred of shaken baby. I would not even think about it tell my youngest is at least 5 to 7 then it would probly be only for summer time. I moved all over as a kid we had a 25 foot trailer that went from work site to work site spent more times in campgrounds then I did school. Freind were just other kids that would come to the camp ground with there family's and then leave. Sometimes we would only be somewhere for 2 weeks before it was time to move agen. No matter how much I miss my family I will not give them the same life I had as a child. There is a lot of stuff we can do now days to stay in touch with are loved ones. I video call almost every night and say good night, if for some reason I don't call I get a call from the 2 year old. Demanding a good night store, or good night kiss. I am out here to make shere I can give my kids a better life then I had. I have thought long and hard, talked to my wife and other drivers and I don't see me putting my desire to be with them for the sacrifice of there happynes as right. Just my 2 cents, you will have to come to your own conclusions about this.

Jonathan T.'s Comment
member avatar

Crete carrier will allow newborn up. Under 4 or 5 and you need a parent with. So yes crete would allow it. Prime will allow it as well. Shaken baby syndrome is not rough riding in a semi. Shaken baby takes alot of shaking. I know cause i asked a pediatric dr cause me and my boys wrestle around alot with me. Yes a month old baby does require more gentle riding but im sure youll be good. Im bringing my wife and 2 young boys with me fir a few months. Good luck to u

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Having more than one person with you is going to be VERY uncomfortable. There isn't a lot of room. I take my wife out with me here and there and we quickly get into each other's way. As far as taking children, wait until there are at least around 6. That way thing can develop at least some semblance of patience and self control. I have fond memories of riding in a truck with my father. He had an early 80s model GMC Astro COE. It was the ugliest green ever. I would suggest a short trip at first. Maybe a few days. See if they like it or not. I loved riding in a truck, but both of my brothers absolutely hated it. I wouldn't force that situation. It will end up breeding resentment. Good luck in your endeavors.

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