Company List Who Provide Paid Training While Obtaining Cdl? Help.

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Flatie C.'s Comment
member avatar

Okay so me and my gf talk about the trucking and she agreed to go with my once I get to the solo driving and leave everything out ( i.g apartment , car ). I really like to pursue trucking career but I need some more information from you guys regarding the paid training program while getting the cdl.

Me and My gf work at the same company and share bills but I pay majority of it like the car payment , internet etc. If I will go for cdl training I am looking for a sponsored company who provide a free cdl training and weekly pay. My gf just couldn't afford to pay all of our bills by herself while I'm in school so theres no way I can go to other training or with out getting a check a week.

I made a research and found Roehl , aparently they won't accept my application due to my location. It's not included to their hiring areas. I live in Oklahoma state, city of tulsa. They only hire drivers thats close to the facility. My second choice is Knight , they pay drivers $400/week while im at school. That would help me a lot while going through the stage of my CDL career. Also I heard a lot about Knight, it's a good company to work with. Other than that I don't know anymore other trucking company that will pay you while doing training with out hitting the road first with a trainer.

I know $400/week is not a lot knowing you will pay for transportation , lodging and food but I can atleast manage to budget that for a whole week since I cook a lot.

If you know any more company that pays training can you please tell me the info? I will really appreciate it. Thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey Flatie......I'm not sure which companies pay you for training right from day one, but all of them pay you once you head out on the highway and that's normally in about two or three weeks from the time you arrive. Here's the list of companies that offer training:

Company-Sponsored Training Programs

If you can't afford to go a couple of weeks without a paycheck I highly suggest you do something to come up with enough money to get by for a few weeks before getting started in trucking. Either sell something or pick up a part time job for a few weeks or borrow from family or whatever you have to do. But you really don't want to show up with hardly a dime in your pocket because you're putting a tremendous amount of additional pressure on yourself that way.

Getting your trucking career underway is way more difficult and stressful than almost anyone ever expects. In fact there are plenty of people never even make it through the training at all. If you go in there totally broke thinking, "I have to hurry up and get more money coming in" you're going to have a nervous breakdown. It's a lot of pressure.

So I suggest finding a way to come up with at least $1,000 somehow to get you through that first month of training until paychecks start coming in. You have to be able to feed yourself and cover the little expenses that come up during that first month.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Flatie, if finances are tight, Company-Sponsored Training Programs are the way to go. With those, you are all but hired when you start school.

I have heard of some company schools that "pay" you during school, but I suspect that may be a loan connected to your tuition. The most common company schools will put you in a hotel (shared room) during school, and either provide meals or not. I went to Swift's school: hotel but you buy your own groceries. Many students learned to love, then hate, Ramen noodles.

The key word to watch for in your hunt for a school is "paid training". Read the fine print, you will see that this paid training is really the Over The Road training just before you get your own truck, not the how-to-drive-the-darn-thing basic school.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Fire Marshal Bill's Comment
member avatar

Use the TT section on sponsored schools that Bret sent you. They will help alot. Being in OK has alot of advantages too and you are close to Dallas which is a major hub for trucking schools.

Personal experience: KLLM will pay you to attend the academy they have. Not much in during phase 1 training though. Enough to survive on while there. They do provide breakfast and dinner after classes. The rest of the time you are on your own. Phase 2 will get you about $550.00 per week when you are with your trainer. Waiting for a trainer is a pain because of the shear column of classes. You will have to wait. But they will let you wait at your house and still pay you if you don't live too far away. No-go for you. While waiting for a trainer they pay @$73.00 per day. Some people waited for weeks for a trainer. I waited about two weeks. Then off to the races.

Hope this helps.

Flatie C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Flatie......I'm not sure which companies pay you for training right from day one, but all of them pay you once you head out on the highway and that's normally in about two or three weeks from the time you arrive. Here's the list of companies that offer training:

Company-Sponsored Training Programs

If you can't afford to go a couple of weeks without a paycheck I highly suggest you do something to come up with enough money to get by for a few weeks before getting started in trucking. Either sell something or pick up a part time job for a few weeks or borrow from family or whatever you have to do. But you really don't want to show up with hardly a dime in your pocket because you're putting a tremendous amount of additional pressure on yourself that way.

Getting your trucking career underway is way more difficult and stressful than almost anyone ever expects. In fact there are plenty of people never even make it through the training at all. If you go in there totally broke thinking, "I have to hurry up and get more money coming in" you're going to have a nervous breakdown. It's a lot of pressure.

So I suggest finding a way to come up with at least $1,000 somehow to get you through that first month of training until paychecks start coming in. You have to be able to feed yourself and cover the little expenses that come up during that first month.

Bret thank you for the response. Thats what me and my gf talk about last night. I might have to find a part time job to come up with the money for training. I submitted my application at Knight but haven't heard anything from them yet. I'm also looking forward at Prime. The training center is not that far from me it's just 2 hrs and 45 mins. My gf can drop me off during the weekend and pick me up after the class as long as it's not on the road yet or theres no activity during those days.

Prime got $200/week food allowance but I am still doubtful if I will get that option if ever I get approved. But I will follow your advice to come up with enough money to get through the training until my pay check.

But how long is the Prime processing? I mean what Phase do I start getting a check? Like after 4 weeks? Thanks!

Use the TT section on sponsored schools that Bret sent you. They will help alot. Being in OK has alot of advantages too and you are close to Dallas which is a major hub for trucking schools.

Personal experience: KLLM will pay you to attend the academy they have. Not much in during phase 1 training though. Enough to survive on while there. They do provide breakfast and dinner after classes. The rest of the time you are on your own. Phase 2 will get you about $550.00 per week when you are with your trainer. Waiting for a trainer is a pain because of the shear column of classes. You will have to wait. But they will let you wait at your house and still pay you if you don't live too far away. No-go for you. While waiting for a trainer they pay @$73.00 per day. Some people waited for weeks for a trainer. I waited about two weeks. Then off to the races.

Hope this helps.

Yes, I totally agree with you. I am close to dallas so it's not bad at all. I searched the KLLM training and they have dif information on their website so I am not sure if it's the updated one or not. How long did you have your training done? Do they have good Reefes? I'm trying to go to reefes. Having a check while going to school is a good thing because my gf needs me for all of our bills. Like what ive said I just can't afford to just go and not pay anything.. Do you have a thread about your training process? If so hope you don't mind me asking the link. I will really appreciate it.

Flatie, if finances are tight, Company-Sponsored Training Programs are the way to go. With those, you are all but hired when you start school.

I have heard of some company schools that "pay" you during school, but I suspect that may be a loan connected to your tuition. The most common company schools will put you in a hotel (shared room) during school, and either provide meals or not. I went to Swift's school: hotel but you buy your own groceries. Many students learned to love, then hate, Ramen noodles.

The key word to watch for in your hunt for a school is "paid training". Read the fine print, you will see that this paid training is really the Over The Road training just before you get your own truck, not the how-to-drive-the-darn-thing basic school.

Thanks for the info erol. Yes, as of now Sponsored training is my only option due to finances. We just can't afford to go to school i'd rather go for sponsored and willing to stay for the company for a year to get more experience while on the road. I will go first and once I'm done with the training and be solo driver then I can just get my gf and go with me together with our dog. Any more suggestion that you can give me? Thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Fire Marshal Bill's Comment
member avatar

I don't have a training thread for my KLLM training.

Classes start every Monday and on Thursday if you have your permit already. Classes are about 15 or so people for 3 weeks. They do a lot to help you and encourage you to pass and get your CDL. They will push you back to a newer class if they think you need additional help. They won't just kick you out if you fail a test. That is if they are confident that you can do it. Some people just stress out at testing. It is not hard at all. Weekends you are on your own. May have to do half day on Saturday sometimes depending on weather. Weekends you will also have to go to a secondary hotel that they have setup for you and then back to the original one on monday. All transport to and from school provided. Food is pretty good too. Breakfast and dinner served monday-Friday and sometimes on work Saturday.

Phase 2 will have you transfered to Lancaster terminal. Hotel provided plus food and transportation. You will do some paperwork there and wait for your trainer. When you get your trainer make sure you feel comfortable with them because if you are not then you will not do so well. The trainer is not your boss nor can they get you fired. If you get into it with them you can request another one. Dont be intimidated by them. My trainer was awesome! Mark Mitchell. He trained me very well and together we probably ate about 200lbs of sunflower seeds. You will be OTR for six weeks. I did 5 because my trainer was confident that I could pass the final evaluation back at Lancaster, TX. I got back on a Friday. They me the weekend off and I did my road test and past on the following Tuesday. Had the option of getting a truck on Wednesday and rolling solo. I took another weekend off and bounced out on Monday.

I pulled loads of various kinds (reefer) till I got to Jackson, MS corporate terminal and picked up a brand new Volvo with only 700 miles on it.

After that I ran like a grey hound.

Not a bad company.

Hope this helps.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Flatie C.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't have a training thread for my KLLM training.

Classes start every Monday and on Thursday if you have your permit already. Classes are about 15 or so people for 3 weeks. They do a lot to help you and encourage you to pass and get your CDL. They will push you back to a newer class if they think you need additional help. They won't just kick you out if you fail a test. That is if they are confident that you can do it. Some people just stress out at testing. It is not hard at all. Weekends you are on your own. May have to do half day on Saturday sometimes depending on weather. Weekends you will also have to go to a secondary hotel that they have setup for you and then back to the original one on monday. All transport to and from school provided. Food is pretty good too. Breakfast and dinner served monday-Friday and sometimes on work Saturday.

Phase 2 will have you transfered to Lancaster terminal. Hotel provided plus food and transportation. You will do some paperwork there and wait for your trainer. When you get your trainer make sure you feel comfortable with them because if you are not then you will not do so well. The trainer is not your boss nor can they get you fired. If you get into it with them you can request another one. Dont be intimidated by them. My trainer was awesome! Mark Mitchell. He trained me very well and together we probably ate about 200lbs of sunflower seeds. You will be OTR for six weeks. I did 5 because my trainer was confident that I could pass the final evaluation back at Lancaster, TX. I got back on a Friday. They me the weekend off and I did my road test and past on the following Tuesday. Had the option of getting a truck on Wednesday and rolling solo. I took another weekend off and bounced out on Monday.

I pulled loads of various kinds (reefer) till I got to Jackson, MS corporate terminal and picked up a brand new Volvo with only 700 miles on it.

After that I ran like a grey hound.

Not a bad company.

Hope this helps.

Thanks for your reply. It really helps. I applied at KLLM as well. Not bad company to start plus the training program. They have the training center at texas. I might go there since thats the closest to my location? Also, is it the best if I go with permit? I am not sure about texas DMV rules about transferring the permit to other state. I will let you know if ever I hear about them soon.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

David L.'s Comment
member avatar

Check to ensure the company you choose has a passenger policy...some don't.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Flatie C.'s Comment
member avatar

Check to ensure the company you choose has a passenger policy...some don't.

Yes and I also check the pet policy.

Great news! I'm preapproved at Swift. The recruiter was nice and I dont need to go to Texas. They have a training center at El Reno Oklahoma. Not far from where I live.

I will get my permit before I head to school. Do i need to go my physical and drug test before taking the CDL permit? Or I will have to take that before the actual driving/class?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Congratulations, Flatie! Welcome to Swift!

A fly in the ointment: Swift does have a pretty policy: no pets.

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