Gloves And Shoes

Topic 13662 | Page 1

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Code Red NV's Comment
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What kind of gloves and shoes do you use? Do you have heavy duty gloves, or just something to keep your hands from getting dirty?

Do you buy expensive gloves that you keep for years, or just buy a bunch of cheap ones and toss them out when they get too grimy?

What about shoes, do you need to have no-slip soles with steel toes? Heavy duty boots all the time, or do you get buy with sturdy work shoes?

Any particular brand, or material is good, and what should you stay away from?

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I personally drive for comfort. Yes I have some sturdy leather boots for when I need them. I also have running shoes, leather slip ons/driving mocs, and yikes.. the dreaded glitzy girlie flip flops too. Mostly I drive in my running shoes lol.

When ya wake up and really gotta go.. the slip ons are awesome for the mad dash to the truck stop bathroom.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

For gloves I have the cheap ones I buy at Harbor Freight (pkg of 6-8prs) for most of the time, but also keep a pair of lined, nicer gloves to wear in winter just if I need to keep my hands warm. Fueling, adjusting tandems , opening/closing trailer doors are about the only times I'm wearing gloves.

For boots, oil resistant, slip resistant for anytime out of the truck. I usually switch back into something more comfortable while I'm driving. Steel toes not required. But keep in mind I'm dry van. If you're gonna do tanker or flatbed, your requirements may be different.

I hope this helps.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I carry leather palmed work gloves to save my hands wielding that 30lb sledgehammer I use to knock out bracing for forklifts, opening trailer doors, etc. And a pair of rubberized fuel resistant gloves. . For fueling obviously.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

When I got to Prime I bought a pair of ****ie sneakers and a pair of carhardt boots. Buying them in MO instead of NJ saved me over $100 no lie. 8 have a pair of 10 dollar gloves I got from a truck stop and they ate sturdy abd I threw then in the washer

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I carry leather palmed work gloves to save my hands wielding that 30lb sledgehammer I use to knock out bracing for forklifts, opening trailer doors, etc. And a pair of rubberized fuel resistant gloves. . For fueling obviously.

Expect to go through two of three pairs of gloves in a year. The only time I've found that I need & use them is working with the trailer. Especially some of those landing gear cranks have sharp edges and I'm thankful for the leather protection. I have a pair of plastic palm jersey gloves for fueling. Harbor Freight - yeah!!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Sonnydogg's Comment
member avatar

I personally wear steel toed mainly for kicking tires. I have a thumper also, but find kicking to just be easier and quicker. They're slip on, so I can change easily if I want for driving. As for gloves, I wear those fabric/rubber palm type for fueling and such. Not really warm in winter weather, but keep my hands clean and dry.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I swear by Cat boots, steel toed sneaker boot. I also have a waterproof pair I wear when it's a steady rain.

Gloves are from Harbor freight; rubber palm for fueling, leather/fabric backed for everyday work and a winter work glove for pretriping in the winter.

miracleofmagick's Comment
member avatar

I just use the cheap work gloves. Buying more expensive ones just doesn't seem worthwhile to me. As for footwear, I usually just wear my sneakers, but keep a pair of steel toe boots for those occasions I'm at a shipper or consignee that requires them.

For gloves I have the cheap ones I buy at Harbor Freight (pkg of 6-8prs) for most of the time, but also keep a pair of lined, nicer gloves to wear in winter just if I need to keep my hands warm. Fueling, adjusting tandems , opening/closing trailer doors are about the only times I'm wearing gloves.

For boots, oil resistant, slip resistant for anytime out of the truck. I usually switch back into something more comfortable while I'm driving. Steel toes not required. But keep in mind I'm dry van. If you're gonna do tanker or flatbed, your requirements may be different.

I hope this helps.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Matt M.'s Comment
member avatar

I use leather gloves for fueling and some kind of synthetic material gloves that are very fitted so I can be more dexterous for opening doors, handling load locks, glad hands, and landing gear. Or other general repairs to the trailer.

Use regular athletic shoes / tennis shoes 99% of the time. You will also want some kind of water proof boots for the rare occasion you have to get out in wet, snowy, or muddy conditions. Lots of dirt lots out there that can get nasty in a hurry.

Never had a problem with not having no slip, although sweeping a trailer that is below freezing can get slippery with the ice on the floor (if you're going reefer anyways). Icy parking lots can get a little slick too, some guys have these little strap-on spikes for their footwear that look pretty nifty.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

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