Weapons In Cab?

Topic 14313 | Page 1

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Zaxby's Comment
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Hello all,

Zach here, (Zaxby) This is my first post on the forurm. However, I would like to thank all of the active members and staff of the forum for all of their valuable knowledge. I was able to find answers to some questions I had, without having to post anything. I am attending school next week, and I look forward to being an active member on the fourm. I will be sure to share my experiences as a new driver.

I was wondering if anyone had any opinions or experiences about firearms in the cab? I found a few threads on here about it, however, they were pretty old. I didn't want to drag up an old thread, and most of the responses didn't quite understand some of the laws in place. My main question is regarding company policies. Regardless if it's against a company's policy or not, what is the likely hood of your company searching the truck? That is my main concern. Shame you have to risk getting fired to uphold your second amendment rights. Some have said "your in deep crap if you go to a state or city where your CHP isn't valid, or simply not allowed will get you in trouble." That's simply not true, so long as you follow the law. There's actually a federal law that says local and state governments can't enforce laws regarding the transportation of firearms, so long as your just passing through the state. I would consider being a truck driver meets that criteria. Many states also consider your vehicle an extension of your home, so no permit needed (I have one anyway.)

Any personal experiences would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

If the Second Amendment is more important to you than following company and customer policies*, you run the risk of losing your job.

Then again, I haven't run across any company that searches your cab at all. Your Ruger's probably safe.

*Company policies in this case trump federal law.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

C. S.'s Comment
member avatar
Regardless if it's against a company's policy or not, what is the likely hood of your company searching the truck?

I suppose it depends on the company, but it isn't a low enough likelihood that I'd ever gamble on it. Many shippers and receivers also have a policy that allows then to search your truck if they'd like (and almost all ban firearms from the premises), although few ever do.

Shame you have to risk getting fired to uphold your second amendment rights.

The second amendment does not apply in this situation. Employers in many other industries do not allow their employees to carry guns, it's not just trucking.

If you want protection on the truck, bring a dog and carry a tire thumper. Bringing a firearm is just more trouble than it's worth.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Matt M.'s Comment
member avatar

Military bases do thorough searches of vehicles, had my bags tossed around and they went through stuff under my bunk.

The only other places that have looked in my cab have been chemical plants, but not very thorough.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Regardless if it's against a company's policy or not, what is the likely hood of your company searching the truck? That is my main concern.

Zach, welcome to the forum!

Many of the drivers in here may not realize that every time they bring their truck into a terminal for service, it is highly likely that their truck is searched without them even knowing it. I am required to bring my truck to a terminal every ten thousand miles, so that is at least once a month.

I am a big proponent of the second amendment, licensed to carry a concealed weapon, but I do not carry in a commercial vehicle. There are just way too many opportunities for this to become an issue.

Many states also consider your vehicle an extension of your home, so no permit needed (I have one anyway.)

Zach, remember this would only apply if the vehicle were registered in your name. Once again it's the little details of these gun laws that will snag you up in a commercial vehicle. You don't want to lose your job over this because more than likely you will have lost your career.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jetguy's Comment
member avatar
There's actually a federal law that says local and state governments can't enforce laws regarding the transportation of firearms, so long as your just passing through the state

Zach- No you're wrong.

I know a friend of a friend- a young man from Texas, who spent a year in prison who had a firearm in his car. He was traveling through New Jersey or New York or one of the New England states.

His Uncle is a Texan judge. Do you think the judge did everything he could to get him off? He sure did! Didn't work. He spent a year in jail. If you want more details, I have none.

Also, no liquor or empty beer cans in the truck. Unless you want a short trucking career, with the end result being that your career is over.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

99.9% of trucking companies (as well as shippers/receivers), prohibit firearms.

It's the companies truck, the companies rules.

This has little/nothing to do with second amendment, CWP reciprocity, state laws or anything else - other than company regulations.

For the record: lifetime NRA member (and trainer), 25 year CWP holder (and daily carrier), collector and gunsmith/armorer (semi-pro), and pretty well versed on firearms laws (and interstate travel with firearms).

This question does come up every so often. As does the attendant debates over morality, rights, self-defense, etc.

This is NO FEDERAL LAW (or state laws) prohibiting a personal firearm in a CMV. But if you want to be a company driver (as everyone starts out being), then you need to put aside everything else other than observing company policy.

Get caught violating that policy - and you won't be driving for that company (or likely any other).

As far as federal laws (called Interstate Compact) - many states do not care about them - and if you're found with an accessible firearm in your vehicle - YOU WILL BE ARRESTED. Whether you get off later or not - YOU WILL have to go through all the BS of getting bonded out, hiring an attorney, fighting the charge(s), getting your record expunged - and GETTING YOUR FIREARM BACK.

NJ is FAMOUS for this, as is MA, MD, IL and a few others.

I traveled the country with a national touring act - armed - and there were a number of states I rose up 2 inches on my seat from my butt puckering in fear. My carry permit has reciprocity in 38 other states - and I pretty much do my best to STAY OUT OF the ones that aren't (NE & west coast).

Rick

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
18 Wheels of Steel's Comment
member avatar

Hopefully at some point we will see concealed weapons permits treated like driver licenses, where if issued in one state, it is good in all states. My firearm does a pretty good job of collecting dust these days, but getting busted with it out on the road seems like a pretty good way to put my trucking career to a premature end.

A suggestion that I haven't seen is a 6 D-Cell Maglite, like the cops used to use. I put an aftermarket LED bulb for extra brightness plus longer battery life. Just rest that bad boy on your shoulder and shine in the perp's eyes. If he keeps coming at you, it's pretty obvious he's up to no good and...well, I think it's pretty easy to figure out the next step. Also doubles as a good tire thumper!

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Hopefully at some point we will see concealed weapons permits treated like driver licenses, where if issued in one state, it is good in all states. My firearm does a pretty good job of collecting dust these days, but getting busted with it out on the road seems like a pretty good way to put my trucking career to a premature end.

A suggestion that I haven't seen is a 6 D-Cell Maglite, like the cops used to use. I put an aftermarket LED bulb for extra brightness plus longer battery life. Just rest that bad boy on your shoulder and shine in the perp's eyes. If he keeps coming at you, it's pretty obvious he's up to no good and...well, I think it's pretty easy to figure out the next step. Also doubles as a good tire thumper!

Catching a conviction for a firearms charge, might also kill your right to own firearms also.

A few recent cases out of NJ got dismissed - but it cost the arrested some $$'s, a lot of sleepless nights and a bunch of negative press.

There's the guy who had a connecting flight in Newark with a checked firearm legally in his bag. Connecting flight got cancelled - airline put him and his bag up in a hotel. When he tried to re-check his bag/firearm - he found himself in cuffs.

In the current political climate, I'd anticipate things getting worse for us - not better.

Rick

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Zach says:

There's actually a federal law that says local and state governments can't enforce laws regarding the transportation of firearms, so long as your just passing through the state

Which law is this, Zach? Suppose you were stopped by an officer and you had to explain this law. "Sir, there's this law, see?" won't cut it. You have hearsay there.

JetGuy drops names:

I know a friend of a friend- a young man from Texas

Do you know anything else about this young Texan?

Rick contributes:

There's the guy who had a connecting flight in Newark with a checked firearm legally in his bag.

Gentlemen, I'm not calling you out for telling stories or passing on rumors. This web forum is called Trucking Truth, not Trucking Rumors. Try do do better in the facts side of things. Personal experience is tops, but if you can get links to news articles or such, great. Let's try to keep things realistic.

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