Help Help Help Me Out Please.

Topic 14350 | Page 1

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Bobby O.'s Comment
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I am under the impression that all these truck companies are going to send people packing if one of them can't back up properly, shift properly, turn in the right gear properly, etc...... I thought trainers would work with people to help them get all of these things down. Maybe I should just stay in this forum than roaming in other forums because some of the things I see in those forums could make you think you made a bad choice of a company to drive for. I'm still here at schneider orientation and I just looked up all these horror stories about these companies. I'm trying to do what my dad always said only believe half of what you see and nothing of what you hear sometimes unless you know the person is telling the truth. And I believe most of what I hear around here in this forum. Can somebody give me some positive feedback. Just the facts (truth) please. Thank you

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Nathan N.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey bobby, if your at Schneider orientation maybe you should keep your distance from negative forums, and negative drivers also, and focus on getting through training and studying, then you won't have to worry about what others say. You can do it!

Mr. T's Comment
member avatar

From my experience at Swift Transportation CDL School they don't just send you home. When you took your test to test out for the state you are given 3 strikes to pass. I highly doubt that a person would fail 3 times unless they just we're not trying & we're not serious. You can do it! I did it without failing any parts & I never even drive a stick shift before in my life. Yea I would advise you stay away from those negative forums & just focus on the prize ahead. Good Luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobby O.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm working my #!# off trying to prove myself , I hate negativity and whiners, I just got left the forum and surfed on other sites and got uneasy, plus I distance myself from these few negative guys and I'm just trying to concentrate on my goal. Thanks Nathan!

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Ok...so the honest answer is that not everyone who attends a truck driving school will graduate and go on to pass their CDL tests. The harsh reality is that many people fail, almost 70% never get through school for a variety of reasons. It requires good hand-eye coordination, common-sense, and really good motor skills. Not everyone will make it, very selective. But definitely not impossible for someone willing to check their ego, listen to the instructors and not fear failure but embrace what is learned from it.

Company-Sponsored Training Programs are fast paced and typically go from start t finish in 3-3.5 weeks. "Woosh", in a blink of an eye you know enough to pass the CDL tests and earn the right to road train with a mentor/trainer for 6-8 weeks depending on the company. With that said, the instructors do everything in their power to teach you the basics. If you apply yourself, put forth an effort, and laser-focus on learning the skills, you stand a good chance of passing. Many times it's the students attitude, fear (yes fear), lack of focus, etc. that ultimately contributes to failure.

Private Truck Driving Schools tend to go at a slower pace, but your initial up front costs are high. It all depends on you; what you can afford, how fast do you learn, etc.

Two different path to consider:

My advice? Until you get a good grip on this, stay out of the cyber-trash trucking sites. They are there for the sole purpose of entertaining their more experienced "super-trucker" members and using newbies as their fodder.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company-sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Terminal Rat ( aka...J's Comment
member avatar

Hang in there Bobby, I'm thinking about Schneider myself so I need you to succeed. LOL!

JJ

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I am under the impression that all these truck companies are going to send people packing if one of them can't back up properly, shift properly, turn in the right gear properly, etc...... I thought trainers would work with people to help them get all of these things down. Maybe I should just stay in this forum than roaming in other forums because some of the things I see in those forums could make you think you made a bad choice of a company to drive for. I'm still here at schneider orientation and I just looked up all these horror stories about these companies. I'm trying to do what my dad always said only believe half of what you see and nothing of what you hear sometimes unless you know the person is telling the truth. And I believe most of what I hear around here in this forum. Can somebody give me some positive feedback. Just the facts (truth) please. Thank you

Bobby, I looked at some of your original posts...I didn't realize that you used to drive, so some of the information I put in my response wasn't exactly relevant. If you have previous experience, why would you listen to anything in the other forums? You know what is right and what is BS. Seriously, if you drove before what are you worried about? It's like riding a bicycle, yeah you'll be rusty but you will stay upright, move forward and it will all come back to you rather quickly. You'll be fine, try to relax.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobby O.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys, I keep my mouth shut and ears wide open everyday, I try to do more than the rest of these guys and I don't ever quit. I just jumped into a forum that bashed everybody and everything but themselves. I'm not surfing anywhere else but staying right here with yall! JJ don't you worry I WILL MAKE IT THROUGH BLOOD SWEAT AND TEARS NO MATTER WHAT! I just advise anybody that reads this topic that is new, PLEASE ONLY READ THETRUCKINGTRUTH.COM FORUM and use all the tools Brett has provide us. Listen to all of the drivers here that are experienced! I will post my diary of my time in class,and otr too soon as I find time. Now it's back to studying.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bobby O.'s Comment
member avatar

G-town , I did use to drive but never looked up any of the forums on trucking. You hit the nail on the head, I am rusty that's what has me so tense sometimes.

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

Bobby, I never even bothered to search for another trucking forum once I found TT. When they say "truth" they mean it! Even if it means having a few moderators put a well-placed boot you-know-where. I'm a prime example of this. When I was considering leaving orientation and posted about it, Brett and Old School gave me a dose of truth that I sorely needed. As a result, I stuck it out through orientation and I'm out here solo now and loving it! Well, mostly....

I spent several months on TT reading every piece of information I could find. As a result, I was more than prepared for being turned loose solo. Even though I have a special dispatcher who is specifically for newbies, I NEVER hear from her! She knows that I can properly manage my clock and that I make my appointments on time, if not early. The only time I talk to her is if I have a question about simple business aspects, like do I need to fax my bills because I am getting reefer temp alerts.

Don't stress yourself out by listening to all the negativity. There is SO much of it in this industry, mostly what people bring upon themselves. Instead, find the people who love their jobs and are successful. Those are the ones who have the most valuable advice!

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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