Automatic Transmission Out Of Cdl School Help!

Topic 14672 | Page 1

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Anthony V.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey everyone so I have a question or maybe a problem I just recived my Cdl though Knight's Squire Training and tested out on a manual transmission however my trainer has an automatic transmission and from what I hear when I am assigned my own truck I'll have an automatic as well. I was kind of hoping I'll have more time to learn on a manual so whenever I leave knight or think about going local I won't be limited in options by just knowing how to drive auto.

I talked to my recruiter they can't really do anything about it since Knight is switching their fleet to all autos by the end of the year . Would it be best to stay put and get my experience with knight but strictly automatic transmission. Or jump ship to another company that will allow me to train and get my experience on a manual.?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Congratulations, Tony! I believe you may be one of the first to worry about transitioning to automatic from manual! (Usually it's the other way around.)

First, why are you already looking to leave a fine company like Knight? They were actually my first choice. You should consider your career choices as more permanent than stepping stone.

Sure, if things don't work out ... But look more at the "hire to retire" point of view.

AS for "forgetting" how to work a manual tranny, no fears. I learned manual 30 years ago, drove for six months then moved on*. I got back into a truck last January a year ago. You know what? The shifter worked exactly as it did so long ago - no problems with double clutching up or down.

* No contradictions with my career advice. I was in college when I learned to drive a truck for a summer job.

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Double Clutching:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Anthony V.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Errol thank you for the fast response I don't wanna leave knight I think they are great for what they offer. It's just I would want at least a few more weeks learning a manual transmission what I learned in Cdl school was very little was only enough to pass the Cdl test. I just want some more time so I'll feel comfortable whenever I get back behind a manual transmission. My only fear is what if I stay with knight get my experience in a automatic and a year later I go local and they drive strictly manual transmission. And I fail a rode test cause I wasn't shifting right or something along Those lines I just wanna make sure I am proficient or at least comfortable in a manual before I drive automatics .

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Anthony, I agree with Erroll. You'll pick up shifting easy enough if you go back to a manual. The other part of this equation is that nearly every national fleet is switching over to these new automated gear boxes.

I'm a Knight driver, and I definitely recommend you put in at least one year at your first driving job.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Hey Errol thank you for the fast response I don't wanna leave knight I think they are great for what they offer. It's just I would want at least a few more weeks learning a manual transmission what I learned in Cdl school was very little was only enough to pass the Cdl test. I just want some more time so I'll feel comfortable whenever I get back behind a manual transmission. My only fear is what if I stay with knight get my experience in a automatic and a year later I go local and they drive strictly manual transmission. And I fail a rode test cause I wasn't shifting right or something along Those lines I just wanna make sure I am proficient or at least comfortable in a manual before I drive automatics .

I am in an auto and never had experience either besides the cdl test. I say don't worry so much about it, if we could learn it as fast as we did to pass a test, we can relearn it for a job if necessary. Also you never know you may end up liking otr and bam that worry is gone. Either way focus on fulfilling your contract with Knight.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Tony cares for his future:

what I learned in Cdl school was very little was only enough to pass the Cdl test.

This is all any school will do: get you past the test. That's why all companies put all "recent grads" on a truck with a trainer for a few weeks.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Anthony V.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you very much to every one who took the time to respond . I'm gonna stay with knight and finish out my training in the automatic I talked to my trainer and he's gonna let me do some local runs in a manual before I test out for my own truck so everything is going good now thank you once again for the great advice 😀

Lemmy_Lives's Comment
member avatar

Anthony, I am feeling exactly the same as you. I was trained in a 10-speed manual, and tested in one as well. I definitely didn't feel totally at ease but I apparently mastered it enough to pass the test. Today at orientation I learned I'll be driving with a mentor in an automatic, getting a road evaluation in one and getting one myself once I get my own truck. I have no problem with automatics (I feel the positives outweigh any negatives regarding them), but I feel I'll be a few steps behind the people who are out there sharpening their skills in manuals. I realize the industry is heading that way, but it seems like I'll be shorting myself in the long run regardless.

Matt M.'s Comment
member avatar

I can understand y'all wanting to get in more time with a manual but I don't think it's that big of a deal.

Sure, if five years down the road you head to a manual company (if there's any left, ha) you will probably be shifting pretty ugly at first but it'll come to you quickly.

You will be experienced and already comfortable with driving a truck, so instead of focusing on five million things at once like a rookie you will only need to focus on the stick. After a day or two you'll be fine.

Certainly not worth jumping ship over.

David H.'s Comment
member avatar

I had the same concern plus wanted the "fun" of driving a manual and feeling like a "real" trucker, but know that compared to an automatic all of that would get old fast.

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