2016\2017 Freightliner Vs Kenworth MPG Average, Please Help

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James P.'s Comment
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I am looking at leasing one of the two and a Freightliner owner told me he can average over 10mpg on I-10 or I-20, I am trying to find out the averages for the newest models as that's what I will be getting. Choices are Cascadia Evolution or T680. Thank you for the help

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I am looking at leasing one of the two and a Freightliner owner told me he can average over 10mpg on I-10 or I-20, I am trying to find out the averages for the newest models as that's what I will be getting. Choices are Cascadia Evolution or T680. Thank you for the help

I call BS. My cascadia 2015 does that empty.... and between 8 and 9 full. Worst week I had was 7.74 all through WY.

Most cascadia owners I've talked to think I'm lying about that so I sent them pics hahaha.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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For starters you have to understand that engines get fuel mileage, not trucks. There's no such thing as "fuel mileage in a Freightliner vs Kenworth" or any of the other brands. The aerodynamics of the body style are going to play a role but beyond that it's the combination of the engine, transmission, rear gearing, the types of tires you're using, any other aerodynamic helpers you might be using on the truck or trailer, and driving style.

If you're looking for great fuel mileage setups look at the way the large carriers have their trucks setup. Look at the combinations they're using of engine, transmission, tires, and gearing. Large fleet trucks are setup for maximum fuel mileage most of the time. That's an excellent place to start.

James P.'s Comment
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I am averaging 8.6 in my pro star so I am hoping to get simular. I am hoping also to stay out of the shop because my pro star goes in about once a month lately. I hear freightliners are cheaper to fix but go in the shop quite often while kenworths are expensive to fix but are more reliable and they have a good 750k warrenty on the engine which it will be paid off by then. Any thoughts on the maintenance side between the two. Thanks again

Farmerbob1's Comment
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I have been in a 2015 Freightliner Cascadia, owned by Stevens Transport.

If I am not pressed for time, I run bobtail or empty at 55 to keep my overall MPG up. At 55-60 MPH, I can get 13-14 MPG bobtail and 11 MPG with an empty trailer.

However, when I am loaded, I do NOT try to save fuel, and run the speed limit, or as fast as the machine will let me, which is now 62. I try to maintain 1500-1600 RPM in 7th on grades that I can't stay over 60 MPH. I do roll hills, but do not allow the truck to get over 65 MPH, because safety will give me a hard time about 'excessive' over-speeds.

Including all empty and bobtail miles, I have averaged 7.6 mpg over the last 40,000 miles, and most of my loads are 35-44k in the box, with about a quarter of my miles being in the Ozarks, Appalachian, and various western mountains. I would estimate that about 1/10 of my miles are bobtail or empty trailer.

I do not have any T680 numbers to offer you.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I am averaging 8.6 in my pro star so I am hoping to get simular. I am hoping also to stay out of the shop because my pro star goes in about once a month lately. I hear freightliners are cheaper to fix but go in the shop quite often while kenworths are expensive to fix but are more reliable and they have a good 750k warrenty on the engine which it will be paid off by then. Any thoughts on the maintenance side between the two. Thanks again

I heard that about FL too. I've had my truck 4 mos and no major problems. Been in shop twice for APU which had nothing to do with the truck per se... that is a rigmaster issue. While there they took care if my oil leak and an air tank valve that needed replacing. Engine wise.. it's great.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

For starters you have to understand that engines get fuel mileage, not trucks. There's no such thing as "fuel mileage in a Freightliner vs Kenworth" or any of the other brands. The aerodynamics of the body style are going to play a role but beyond that it's the combination of the engine, transmission, rear gearing, the types of tires you're using, any other aerodynamic helpers you might be using on the truck or trailer, and driving style.

If you're looking for great fuel mileage setups look at the way the large carriers have their trucks setup. Look at the combinations they're using of engine, transmission, tires, and gearing. Large fleet trucks are setup for maximum fuel mileage most of the time. That's an excellent place to start.

Interesting details. Thanks ;)

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

James,

I hear ...

are dangerous words in these parts. You've made two posts, so I'll give you a break. :)

Trucking Truth is based on personal experience and facts.

I've driven a 2016 Freightliner for over six months. The only time it has passed through shop doors is for one B maintenance (50,000 miles).

I'm not saying it's the best semi tractor on the road (it isn't), but I've never even had to add oil so far.

Brett mentioned that companies order their equipment for the best mileage. They also factor in best maintenance. By the numbers you see on the highway, it looks like Freightliners do well in both departments.

Just like Swift, FL is the brand everybody loves to hate.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

I'd have to agree with Errol...I've driven Internationals Prostar with both the Maxforce and Cummins engine in it. I've driven three different trucks. The first was pulling fine...I didn't notice anything wrong with it. It was burning coolant and being a rookie I didn't think anything of it. Maintenance noticed it and had me bring the truck in for repairs. That's when I got the second...no problems...only PM....now the third has only 82g on it...been in twice for PM....no problems. Good luck with your decision!!

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

My T680 is running at 7.4 mpg currently. I set my cruise at 62 loaded or empty. In three months doing this, I have upped the fuel mileage from 6.5 to 7.4.

It is a 2014 with 350k miles on it. It has been in the shop once when the engine fan clutch went out.

Something I have noticed about the KWs (680 and 700) is they seem to go through a lot of DEF. I always have to put in at least a quarter tank at every fuel stop, sometimes more. Anybody know if this is normal?

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