Swift In Cab Camera

Topic 15613 | Page 10

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Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I would like to expand on something Brett said early on in this thread, a couple of years ago.

"Let me fix this. I always word this wrong. The cameras do indeed record constantly but they do not transmit the video constantly. They do not send video to anyone for monitoring unless there is an event that triggers the camera to do so, like hard braking or an impact of some sort. So yes they're always recording, but no there is not someone on the other end watching it. They only save the recording and send it in for monitoring if an event triggers it."

Brett is absolutely correct, and in addition, the storage media size determines how much is actually recorded. 32 GB of flash memory will hold about 8 hours of HD video. It records in a loop, and any trigger event will mark a segment locked so that it isn't recorded over. Those locked files will take away from the total storage, as well, since they can't be recorded over.

Now, let's talk about remote viewing. Not being a driver, I'm not sure how the cameras transmit. Is it cell, or does it use the Qualcomm connection to transmit? And if it uses the Qualcomm's connection, is that cell or satellite? With a cell connection, transmitting live HD video eats up a LOT of data. Imagine them remotely streaming video from even a handful of trucks constantly, let alone the tens or hundreds of thousands of trucks they have on the road. What do you think that data plan would cost? Satellite is even worse, and probably not possible. Downloading video from a satellite, like Direct TV, is easy, uploading it (from a truck to the satellite) is nearly impossible. Those systems are designed for text messages. Uploading to a satellite requires a large dish, powerful transmitter, and precise positioning.

I don't believe for a second wholesale remote viewing is happening, the cost to do so would greatly exceed the payoff. Unless they had reason to suspect a driver of something, it simply isn't feasible, and even then it isn't going to be for eating a sandwich, or not wearing a seatbelt.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I would like to expand on something Brett said early on in this thread, a couple of years ago.

double-quotes-start.png

"Let me fix this. I always word this wrong. The cameras do indeed record constantly but they do not transmit the video constantly. They do not send video to anyone for monitoring unless there is an event that triggers the camera to do so, like hard braking or an impact of some sort. So yes they're always recording, but no there is not someone on the other end watching it. They only save the recording and send it in for monitoring if an event triggers it."

double-quotes-end.png

Brett is absolutely correct, and in addition, the storage media size determines how much is actually recorded. 32 GB of flash memory will hold about 8 hours of HD video. It records in a loop, and any trigger event will mark a segment locked so that it isn't recorded over. Those locked files will take away from the total storage, as well, since they can't be recorded over.

Now, let's talk about remote viewing. Not being a driver, I'm not sure how the cameras transmit. Is it cell, or does it use the Qualcomm connection to transmit? And if it uses the Qualcomm's connection, is that cell or satellite? With a cell connection, transmitting live HD video eats up a LOT of data. Imagine them remotely streaming video from even a handful of trucks constantly, let alone the tens or hundreds of thousands of trucks they have on the road. What do you think that data plan would cost? Satellite is even worse, and probably not possible. Downloading video from a satellite, like Direct TV, is easy, uploading it (from a truck to the satellite) is nearly impossible. Those systems are designed for text messages. Uploading to a satellite requires a large dish, powerful transmitter, and precise positioning.

I don't believe for a second wholesale remote viewing is happening, the cost to do so would greatly exceed the payoff. Unless they had reason to suspect a driver of something, it simply isn't feasible, and even then it isn't going to be for eating a sandwich, or not wearing a seatbelt.

Grumpy...10 seconds before and 10 seconds after the triggered event is the extent of the upload. The content is sent to an outsourced clearing house to preview before alerting driver management. 99% of the content is not forwarded to driver management.

Qualcomm is not an integral part of the camera system.

The camera can only store 20 total seconds of content, then its erased, written over. Although Swift deactivated the cab interior facing lens, road facing lens still exists and uploads exactly the same way as described.

There is no real time viewing since it’s not a direct feed.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I am happier now, being an owner op and not having to deal with that nonsense.

Yeah, owning a rig and running your own business sounds like way less nonsense than having a dash cam.

rofl-1.gif

You can always tell when someone is a new business owner. They feel large and in charge and have no idea about the troubles that lie ahead. They feel like being the boss will solve all of their problems.

Have fun with that!

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

I was reading this ridiculous feed.

Paul J.

I drove a fuel tanker before, and yes we didn't have driver facing cameras. I wish I had at least road facing ones several times. But they weren't either available or they were too expensive to put in all of our trucks. The point is, as G-town and Brett have said over and over (exhausting thread), you are only an employee on that truck. You don't own it. So either get with the program or keep the pie hole shut!

If you are a professional driver, then you should have nothing to fear from a driver facing camera. PERIOD!

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Why is it that the ones who have the smart*** comments never say where they are from? Or their position, (considering a career, in CDL School, Rookie driver, or experienced driver). I don't mind the aliases, some are cool. But to leave out where your from seems like your hiding something.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Why is it that the ones who have the smart*** comments never say where they are from? Or their position, (considering a career, in CDL School, Rookie driver, or experienced driver). I don't mind the aliases, some are cool. But to leave out where your from seems like your hiding something.

There are a lot of people who are convinced they know all that needs to be known and they're right about everything so they're not really interested in furthering the discussion. They don't want to hear any opinions that might change their mind. They don't want to hear anything that make them feel as if they're wrong. They're not interested in learning more or growing as a person. They just want to jump in, tell you what they think, and leave.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the insight here Brett, and thanks again for starting TT. It is a breath of fresh air!

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

The camera isnt seeing anything else, other than what anyone that can see into your windows is all ready seeing. You are driving a rig as big and more expensive than some houses with cargo that could be worth thousands, plus the liability should you make a mistake it could cost the companies millions in settlements. They also protect the driver in case and could prove his or her innocence in a accident.

I highly doubt many people would get their jollies spying on drivers in their sleeper, I know if they spied on me I would have to question his or her sanity!

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I highly doubt many people would get their jollies spying on drivers in their sleeper

I always laugh about that. Like, if you worked for a security agency, imagine getting stuck in the "truckers" division. Talk about punishment! Your job is to view truckers alone in their cab all day long.

shocked.pngwtf.gif

If you're not hot, no one wants to watch you undress. Pretty basic principle.

rofl-3.gif

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I would like to expand on something Brett said early on in this thread, a couple of years ago.

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

"Let me fix this. I always word this wrong. The cameras do indeed record constantly but they do not transmit the video constantly. They do not send video to anyone for monitoring unless there is an event that triggers the camera to do so, like hard braking or an impact of some sort. So yes they're always recording, but no there is not someone on the other end watching it. They only save the recording and send it in for monitoring if an event triggers it."

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Brett is absolutely correct, and in addition, the storage media size determines how much is actually recorded. 32 GB of flash memory will hold about 8 hours of HD video. It records in a loop, and any trigger event will mark a segment locked so that it isn't recorded over. Those locked files will take away from the total storage, as well, since they can't be recorded over.

.......

I don't believe for a second wholesale remote viewing is happening, the cost to do so would greatly exceed the payoff. Unless they had reason to suspect a driver of something, it simply isn't feasible, and even then it isn't going to be for eating a sandwich, or not wearing a seatbelt.

double-quotes-end.png

Grumpy...10 seconds before and 10 seconds after the triggered event is the extent of the upload. The content is sent to an outsourced clearing house to preview before alerting driver management. 99% of the content is not forwarded to driver management.

Qualcomm is not an integral part of the camera system.

The camera can only store 20 total seconds of content, then its erased, written over. Although Swift deactivated the cab interior facing lens, road facing lens still exists and uploads exactly the same way as described.

There is no real time viewing since it’s not a direct feed.

Yep, it would be insanely expensive for the upload capability to be able to remote view, or upload a constant stream, and even to have someone going through that much data, the personnel required would be on the magnitude of the NSA, to be able to monitor remotely or even after the fact if it were sending a live feed. No one would be able to afford a dash cam if that were the case.

Not to mention, you shouldn't be eating a sandwich while driving an 80,000 lb rig, driving without a seatbelt, etc. I can wolf down a sandwich in less than a minute if I really had to, but even taking my time, it would take less than 5 minutes, 10 minutes for a sub. If you are on that tight a schedule, you need to manage your time better.

As far as an intimate conversation with your wife, by law they cannot have audio without informing you, and they would have you sign off, or have a posted sign. Otherwise they are in violation of federal wiretapping laws. No one is risking prison to listen to you.

I won't turn on audio for a customer's cameras unless they permanently attach a sign to every single camera, and I monitor that the signs aren't removed. So far, no one has agreed to that, because they don't want to spend the money, or they wanted to do it on the sly. I would have been liable for setting it up, so it was a no go for me. Now if you are worried about video during that intimate conversation, or changing clothes, close the curtain, hang your hat on it, or whatever. As for me, I could care less, I don't even have full curtains on my house. If you want to look, feel free. You'll probably want to bleach your eyes afterward, but that's your problem.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

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