Why Aren't Shippers...

Topic 16811 | Page 1

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Isaac H.'s Comment
member avatar

Why aren't shippers at least somewhat responsible for the weight of the trailer? Having the shipper put the weight as 30,000 and then scaling myself and finding out I'm close to 80k is really getting old.

Had a load yesterday that the bills said 42k and i weighed myself and was at 79960.

If we can only shift weight by 250pound increments then the trailers should not be loaded past 79750 and that's if your steers have 12000 on them exactly.

I took the load. Maybe shouldn't have. Not sure what i should have done. Go back and tell them to take stuff off the trailer? Thankfully this isn't one of our dedicated shippers. Just an otr trip to get me back after taking home time.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Shippers only document the weight of the cargo, not the total weight. Only a scale can record an accurate total; tractor, trailer and cargo.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

At Swift, if we are overweight, we are to return to the shipper for a re work of the load. Sometimes that requires them to remove product. Gladhand learned an expensive lesson recently. A $1300.00 ticket in Illinois for a bridge law violation. He wasn't OVERWEIGHT but his kingpin to tandem spacing was in violation. I scale anything that I believe may be questionable. An extra 30-60 minutes of my time beats a FINE like he got.

smile.gif

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Agree with Tractor. The lading weight on the bill could an estimate or flat out wrong. No one here really knows why there is such ambiguity in how cargo weight is represented on a bill. Ultimately you are responsible. If you can't scale out legally you have two choices; run with it and risk a ticket or take it back to the shipper and have them rework the load. Have the scale ticket handy.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

Isaac...some drivers will weigh their truck with an empty van to tell them their empty weight. Then your able to add the weight from the shippers document. What I used to do is if it adds up close to 80k...I would scale...if it adds up to somewhere 79k and lower...I knew I'd be safe. I also shipped from a relatively constant shipper. Each load was roughly loaded in the same manner...so I bacame accustomed to where the tandems were set. But...knowing what your truck weighs empty will help you in the future. As others have said...when in doubt...scale it.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

Also keep in mind - that shippers will try to stuff EVERY LAST POUND OF PRODUCT in your box they can. Goes especially for large DC type orders - where you're not the only truckload of that product going to that recipient. The water companies are FAMOUS for trying to stuff an extra pallet of 16 oz bottled water in your box.

I see this a lot down on the port where I've done work as a longshoreman. The union gets a cut of TONNAGE on containers. The BOL for any given container is almost always off, as the shipper tries to beat the shipping company out of $$ on the shipping cost. Gross is supposed to be chalked on the side of the container - at the shipping port, they do it by the declared weight on the BOL (which is how it goes on the shippers computer). The container cranes have scales built-in - so the operator compares the declared weight, to the ACTUAL WEIGHT - and the longshoreman invoice for the ACTUAL TONNAGE MOVED, not the declared. But the INTERMODAL DRIVER that moves that box off the port - may end up getting jammed up for a container that weighs 1,000's of lbs more than declared weight, when he rolls across a scale with it.

Rick

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Tim suggests:

Isaac...some drivers will weigh their truck with an empty van to tell them their empty weight. Then your able to add the weight from the shippers document. What I used to do is if it adds up close to 80k...I would scale...if it adds up to somewhere 79k and lower...I knew I'd be safe. I also shipped from a relatively constant shipper. Each load was roughly loaded in the same manner...so I bacame accustomed to where the tandems were set. But...knowing what your truck weighs empty will help you in the future. As others have said...when in doubt...scale it.

Tim this only works if the BOL weight is accurate. At times it's not. Weighing an empty truck and dry van can provide a "nominal" weight to be used as a guide. Remember reefer trailers are always heavier than a dry van. Weighing an empty each time IMO is not necessary and uses up valuable time (can't really determine if that's what you are suggesting).

I think a fair rule of thumb to consider is weigh any load in excess of 30,000lbs, if for no other reason than balance.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
I think a fair rule of thumb to consider is weigh any load in excess of 30,000lbs, if for no other reason than balance.

Agreed!

smile.gif

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I keep this scale ticket with me. The 45,415 is the BOL listed weight for the cargo. My truck was 80 pounds short of breaking the law, with half a tank of fuel. (If I had a full tank, it would be over the legal limit.)

20161030_122159_zpsuwlcsusw.jpg

I keep this so if some shipper has a load close to 45,000, we talk first, before I pull out from the dock. As the others have said, many shippers want to get as much on your truck as possible. No they won't be scamming you to get you overloaded, so if you can get the load adjusted before you start, do it.

The bottom line for a DOT officer is, who's in the driver seat? And that would be you. That whole truck, on the road, is your responsibility. No explanation needed.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Our policy is to scale every load. If im very light, I dont though. Overweight fines are no joke and i dont want to work for free for a week.

The problem with shippers is, likr Errol said, theyll try to squeeze every bit of what they "think" they can get away with to try to save on freight costs. Another problem is those who have scales.. They often arent accurate.

I do not hesitate to make a shipper offload product or rework the load if they loaded it to heavy to the back. Ill always try to make it legal first though. Depending on the product (never do this with glass or anything bottled in glass lol) is a few really forward hard brakes to help slide the stuff forward a bit. If youve done absolutely everything you can that sometimes works.. Same for too much towards the front..

Our safety dept has us figured out on that so they never say anything about those hard brakes during scaling anymore. If you have any easily damaged product or tall paper rolls--DONT DO THAT!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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