I Am So Disappointed That None Of The Good Trucking Companies Hire CDL Trainees In WV.

Topic 16853 | Page 1

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Dan E.'s Comment
member avatar

That is West Viginia. And the handful that do accept trainees require team driving during company training which is a deal breaker for me. I want to do this job but I want my trainer in the seat next to me. I don't want try to sleep while some stranger drives, and I don't want to drive while someone who should be training me sleeps. I guess that is the price of company paid CDL training.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

That is how ALL TRAINING IS DONE by training companies...

The "first phase" of training, has the trainer in the passenger seat observing and instructing. This usually goes for 10,000 miles and then you go test and get your CDL.

Phase 2 of training, you run as a team - typically for 30,000 miles give or take.

So you DO get your training with the trainer observing/instructing - then you run like you would be running OTR , albeit as a team.

Look at it this way - how do you think the TRAINER FEELS (probably having a few years under his belt) trying to sleep with a ONE MONTH ROOKIE at the wheel?

This has NOTHING TO DO with "West Virginia" - and EVERYTHING TO DO with how training is done by EVERYONE IN THE INDUSTRY. So you're not being "singled out", for coming from there.

Prime is considered the "model" for how most other companies do training. And that's how THEY do it. Some other companies, may have slightly shorter (or longer) durations of training phases.

Best of luck...

Rick

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Dan, I'm happy to say you're simply being a Nervous Nellie. Don't worry yourself so much.

Listen, you have to remember that if you get in a wreck while you're driving, so does your trainer! Do you think most trainers are going to go to sleep while someone they don't trust is driving? Of course not.

There will be a lot of wide open, relaxing drive time on the Interstate. You don't need someone sitting there every second for hours and hours at a time just to watch you steer in a straight line on a sunny day in the middle of nowhere.

If you start out with one of the major companies they're going to have a solid training system, though each company does it a little differently. The biggest difference in the quality of your training will actually come from the individual trainer you get. Regardless of the company you choose there will be trainers at both ends of the spectrum and everywhere in between, from a real dream to a real nightmare. As long as you get a decent trainer it won't matter what company you start out at. You'll be trained just fine. And any company will let you switch trainers if you get one you don't get along with.

To be honest, you're worrying about finding a major company that's good enough at what they do to meet your standards. Trust me, these companies are all good enough at what they do to train you properly. You just have to pick a company that suits you well when it comes to types of freight, running areas, home time, and equipment.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, Dan, team driving with a trainer is how you will get prepared for all those solo miles in your future. My trainer (in about for weeks of team driving) mentioned a few of his students that he was almost afraid to go to sleep while they drove. So I feel the sooner your trainer feels confident in your driving the better a driver you are.

Also, 99% of your driving will be on interstates that are on level ground (no serious hills). What's there to train for? The real training will happen at shippers and receivers, you can bet on that.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Just to put it out there. Majority, if not all, of companies that take students straight out of school will pay tuition reimbursement. Yes, you will have to secure funding for the school initially. Whether that be grants, loans, etc... A good accredited school will be able to help you secure funding. It is another option.

Also check with the local schools. More than a few a partnered with companies. The same companies that offer in house CDL training. But, will take the school as your initial CDL training. You still sign a contract with them as if you were going to their full CDL school. But you will go to the local school for your CDL then go to the company to do all your finishing training.

Remember there is always more than 1 way to skin a cat. You just have to get creative in the skinning process.

Drive Safe Y'all and God Speed.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Steve_HBG's Comment
member avatar

In my humble opinion, the quality of the training Dan E receives is based solely on the quality of the trainer... regardless of whether a Company is considered "good" or "bad."

Good luck to you, Dan E. I hope you find what you seek in this industry.

Dan E.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys for some thoughtful replies. After thinking about it on the flip side from a new perspective. I never put my life in another persons hands which is what I feel I would be doing if I slept in a truck while a stranger was driving. How can they pay you enough to put your lives on he line to train new guys? Seems like that would form a serious bond and I can't imagine how this would work out. I guess I have trust issues.

Dan E.'s Comment
member avatar

I wanted to drive for Maverick, TMC, or Reohl, but you can't get company sponsored CDL training from those guys if you live in WV even though I watch multiple trucks from these companies drive up and down our interstates. I am disappointed that they can drive thru my state but not offer jobs to good candidates because we live here. That is bs IMO.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Thanks guys for some thoughtful replies. After thinking about it on the flip side from a new perspective. I never put my life in another persons hands which is what I feel I would be doing if I slept in a truck while a stranger was driving. How can they pay you enough to put your lives on he line to train new guys? Seems like that would form a serious bond and I can't imagine how this would work out. I guess I have trust issues.

Dan E like it or not, your life as a trucker is in other people's hands all day long,...other drivers.

How would you suggest they train you? At least at Swift there is 50 hours of supervised hand-holding, after that, the next 150 hours of driving is team running.

Dan E.'s Comment
member avatar

Did you need that hand holding? I know I would. Were you ready to do it alone after those hours?

double-quotes-start.png

Thanks guys for some thoughtful replies. After thinking about it on the flip side from a new perspective. I never put my life in another persons hands which is what I feel I would be doing if I slept in a truck while a stranger was driving. How can they pay you enough to put your lives on he line to train new guys? Seems like that would form a serious bond and I can't imagine how this would work out. I guess I have trust issues.

double-quotes-end.png

Dan E like it or not, your life as a trucker is in other people's hands all day long,...other drivers.

How would you suggest they train you? At least at Swift there is 50 hours of supervised hand-holding, after that, the next 150 hours of driving is team running.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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