Failed Drug Test; Bad Background; Kicked Out Of Army

Topic 18087 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
William W.'s Comment
member avatar

Hello,

I want to drive a truck.

I was kicked out of the Army September of 2010 due to my own bad choices. My DD214 (discharge paper) reads: General Under Honorable Conditions; Misconduct (Drug Abuse).

While I was still in the Army, living in Texas, between the years of 2008-09, I was arrested for assault. I plead guilty under the plea deal "Deferred Adjudication". I did a year probation successfully and I wasn't convicted of the misdemeanor. Again, later in the Army, I failed the drug test for marijuana, got kicked out.

Out of the Army, somewhere in the years of 2011-12, I get pulled over and arrested for possession of marijuana. Again, I plead guilty under the plea deal "Deferred Adjudication". I completed a year probation successfully and wasn't convicted of the misdemeanor.

So, to be clear, I have no convictions.

Later, I forget exactly when, I get pulled over for no drivers insurance, given a ticket, sent on my way.

Later, I believe around May of 2013, leaving Texas, moving to California, I get pulled over for speeding. Quite possibly exceeded 15mph, therefore considered reckless driving. In California I didn't pay fines immediately, so they revoked my license. Finally paid my fines and got my license restored August of 2014.

I regret the many choices I've made. I was a foolish idiot through and through.

Now, in California, I've held down jobs, quit the drugs, quit smoking weed, clean over 3 years now. I plan to keep it that way. Been driving good, no tickets. I just don't want to be a "rebel" anymore. I want to do right, be clean. I also want what is good, though I don't deserve what is good because of my past choices.

I've reached out to two different company-sponsored schools, seeking to receive my CDL's and training. The first company/school, upon hearing I had a possible reckless driving on my record wouldn't accept me. Understandable. The second company/school I'm still waiting to hear back from. They're looking into my Texas background. Given my background, when I hear back from them, I highly doubt it's going to be a go.

I'll contract with any school for a year or more. Not so much worried about the pay as much as getting my foot in the door; getting the experience to become a pro. I'm starting to think my chances of becoming a trucker are now slim to none...closer to none. At the same time I don't want to give up.

The next step I want to take is getting my background check from Hireright. I want to see what everyone else will see, that way I can tell them all beforehand.

So this is where I'm at. Please, any thoughts/advice would be greatly appreciated. Do I stand a chance of getting in, at all???

Thank you for your time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

I recommend that you contact Carolina Cargo. They are a well known "2nd Chance" Company. Just be very upfront with them about your past and that you have an honest desire to change your ways. That is one hell of a story, you are going to have a lot to overcome. Best of luck to you.

smile.gifgood-luck.gif

Shiva's Comment
member avatar

BTW, Weed is a drug smile.gif

Hello,

I want to drive a truck.

I was kicked out of the Army September of 2010 due to my own bad choices. My DD214 (discharge paper) reads: General Under Honorable Conditions; Misconduct (Drug Abuse).

While I was still in the Army, living in Texas, between the years of 2008-09, I was arrested for assault. I plead guilty under the plea deal "Deferred Adjudication". I did a year probation successfully and I wasn't convicted of the misdemeanor. Again, later in the Army, I failed the drug test for marijuana, got kicked out.

Out of the Army, somewhere in the years of 2011-12, I get pulled over and arrested for possession of marijuana. Again, I plead guilty under the plea deal "Deferred Adjudication". I completed a year probation successfully and wasn't convicted of the misdemeanor.

So, to be clear, I have no convictions.

Later, I forget exactly when, I get pulled over for no drivers insurance, given a ticket, sent on my way.

Later, I believe around May of 2013, leaving Texas, moving to California, I get pulled over for speeding. Quite possibly exceeded 15mph, therefore considered reckless driving. In California I didn't pay fines immediately, so they revoked my license. Finally paid my fines and got my license restored August of 2014.

I regret the many choices I've made. I was a foolish idiot through and through.

Now, in California, I've held down jobs, quit the drugs, quit smoking weed, clean over 3 years now. I plan to keep it that way. Been driving good, no tickets. I just don't want to be a "rebel" anymore. I want to do right, be clean. I also want what is good, though I don't deserve what is good because of my past choices.

I've reached out to two different company-sponsored schools, seeking to receive my CDL's and training. The first company/school, upon hearing I had a possible reckless driving on my record wouldn't accept me. Understandable. The second company/school I'm still waiting to hear back from. They're looking into my Texas background. Given my background, when I hear back from them, I highly doubt it's going to be a go.

I'll contract with any school for a year or more. Not so much worried about the pay as much as getting my foot in the door; getting the experience to become a pro. I'm starting to think my chances of becoming a trucker are now slim to none...closer to none. At the same time I don't want to give up.

The next step I want to take is getting my background check from Hireright. I want to see what everyone else will see, that way I can tell them all beforehand.

So this is where I'm at. Please, any thoughts/advice would be greatly appreciated. Do I stand a chance of getting in, at all???

Thank you for your time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Mr. Jackhole's Comment
member avatar

Not going to sugar coat it. You probably won't get hired for several years if then. Being released from military for drugs isn't something that will go away.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

William W., I hope you don't mind, but I'm going to summarize what you said above just to make it easier to digest. Here are the negative items trucking companies are going to look at:

1. General discharge from Army, September 2010 2. Probation for assault, no conviction, 2009, probation completed 3. Failed drug test, 2010 4. Probation for possession, no conviction, 2012, probation completed 5. Driving without insurance, 2012-2013? 6. Reckless driving (speeding >15 mph), May 2013 7. License revocation, 2013 - August 2014

Now, I'm not trying to discourage you, especially since you're trying to turn your life around. It sounds like you are facing the reality you created by your behavior and are trying to figure out a way to make a better life for yourself. I applaud you for that. I went through something like that when I was much younger, but had the good fortune to never get caught doing some of the bad things I did.

One of the first things to do when you're in that transition from the old life to the new life is to face the facts, which is why I listed them above. I'm not saying you haven't faced the facts; obviously, you have, since you've been so open about them. Rather, what I'm saying is that these are the things that you are going to have to overcome to break into this industry.

Some of these items are going to be high barriers to entry. Some companies will view them as being cured by time, some won't. Truck drivers are entrusted with expensive equipment and valuable cargo. The trucking companies and their insurers want to make sure that the odds are very good that that equipment and cargo will make it from one place to another without incident. Past issues with drugs and driving convictions make those odds go down. The way to make the odds go up is to avoid any more problems for some period of time.

The three driving violations (no insurance, reckless driving, and revocation) are pretty recent in terms of convincing a trucking company to overlook them. The combination of driving violations in such a short span (three in about two years) will also raise eyebrows.

There are companies that will hire you in spite of those items, but generally they'll want some period of time to have elapsed without any violations before they'll look at your application. That period of time varies by company. Some will want to see at least two or three years without violations, some will want to see five or seven or ten years without violations, and some companies will disqualify you for life based on the reckless driving ticket alone.

The same can be said separately for the drug violations and the general discharge. Some trucking companies will say ok, it's been X number of years and you've straightened your life out, we'll give you a shot. Some will say never since you failed a drug test.

Frankly, I think it's going to be tough for you right now to get trained and hired in the trucking industry, but I can't say it will be impossible. Carolina Cargo has already been mentioned as one of those companies known to be more willing to take on people who have marks on their history. There are other OTR companies that might give you a shot as well. There are also probably some local companies in California or elsewhere that will take a chance on you, but most of them won't train you, so you'll have to figure out how to get your CDL first.

I don't want you to be discouraged. Again, I think it is admirable that you want to change the way you live. I would suggest applying to as many places as you can to find out what some different companies will say. There is a place on this site where you can apply to a bunch of companies with one application. That will help you to figure out who might be interested.

Finally, if you try all this and you still get turned down, the other thing to consider is whether you can find a suitable job where the barriers aren't so high. There is more than one path to a better life. It's tough going to turn it around some times, but it is worth it. If you run into dead ends, turn around and look for another route.

Good luck, and let us know how it turns out!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
William W.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks everyone for your comments. I really appreciate the advice, straightforwardness, and encouragement. Yeah, I hope to keep you all informed here, let you know if there's any progress.

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

Here is the link to shotgun your application out.

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

Here is our "starter pack" for getting into this industry.

Good Luck in your endeavors.

Drive Safe and God Speed

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I won't sugar coat this, either. Stop making poor decisions that will have lasting consequences on your life.

-Charles, Retired Military

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More