Frustrations With Werner Enterprises, I'm Finished With Them

Topic 18670 | Page 9

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ad356's Comment
member avatar

Pitkin, Schneider has regional jobs that supposedly get you home every weekend. perhaps someone that knows more then me could chime in on that. i was considering going there at one point. the only thing that concerned me was the length of their training program. i believe its only one week. after the length of time werner left me sitting in a hotel, and the inconsistency of the trainers i really cannot recommend them. some werner trainers are great and some not so much. i actually had a room mate at werner that his trainer wrecked the truck while he was sleeping in the bunk. i dont know if all companies are like that.

given my limited experience and the chewing i have already received i will let someone else comment and lead the rest of the discussion regarding schnieder regional. i fully understand wanting to see your wife and child. no one wants to screw up their relationship with their child or their marriage, heck we are in the same boat.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Ad365 continues to "gnaw at the bone" he has with Werner:

after the length of time werner left me sitting in a hotel I cannot recommend them

BECAUSE IT WAS THE CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY. Rather important that you LEFT THAT OUT...!!!

You are like a broken record and haven't learned anything. MOVE ON and GET OVER IT...we are not here to badmouth any company. Take your bad attitude and complaints to Truckers Report, they love PUPS like you...

Pitkin please heed this advice; "good drivers can be successful for most any company", including Werner...!!!

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
after the length of time werner left me sitting in a hotel, and the inconsistency of the trainers i really cannot recommend them

Wow. So the company was founded in 1956, has one of the largest fleets in the nation with like 8,000+ drivers, is one of the most consistently profitable carriers you'll find anywhere, and is certainly one of the most successful carriers in the history of the industry. But because you had to sit in a hotel room a few extra days and one or two trainers didn't meet your criteria you now feel you're qualified to start giving career advice and recommending that people stay away from a carrier with these credentials?

omg my head is starting to spin.

Listen, why don't you go ahead and worry about your own career right now because it seems like you have a lot on your plate. Let us handle the burden of giving career advice. I think it's better for everyone that way.

Pat M.'s Comment
member avatar

spinning-head-o.gif

Sidney V. (Chris)..Popeye's Comment
member avatar

Hard for me to believe this guy is still going on about his perception of real world trucking. Look, driver, in case you haven't picked up on any of the blunt advice or captured some of the "between the lines" help being offered, it is not really the COMPANY, but the people that make up the company. Reputations, good or bad, are perceived by most of the world by what one says, does, or does not do. Remember it is better to be thought a fool or an idiot than to open ones' mouth and have it confirmed. Your mouth, sir, has been open far too long. Put up or shut. Regardless of which way it goes, stay safe out there and good luck.

spinning-head-o.gif

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Turbo617's Comment
member avatar

At first I thought you was all professional. But definetly behave different over at truckersreport.

No need to mention this site over there, pretty much signifying that these drivers here don't know what they are talking about, especially when you said you agreed with all that was said here. Why flip the script over on truckersreport?

Personally I would've made the thread there like you did, but NOT mention this site. I'd soak in all the advice I can get from both ends and make my decision, because ultimately it would be my decision. ( I'd do the same here. Make a post there and NOT mention what was said over here )

Han Solo Cup's Comment
member avatar

Update for everyone... ad356 left Werner for Rist and was fired within a week and a half. Of course, this isn't his fault, nothing was explained to him, and he would have acted differently had "it" been laid out/explained to him. He has since decided to give up on truck driving altogether.

I don't mention this out of spite. I'm actually immensely grateful when I read posts like this one and then hear experienced truckers chiming in to try and help break down a situation and potentially help the student learn what might be the real issues. I don't think "ad356" will ever accept the true root(s) of his issues. For some people, it's always someone else's fault.

Every day I read updates to the training diaries and peruse the questions from new drivers... I'm very happy I found this site.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

"Well, Surprise, Surprise!" (In my best Gomer Pyle voice)

Ryan R.'s Comment
member avatar

Han Solo Cup,

What was he fired for? I'm not really taking his side... the only thing he said that have any sympathy for is the fact his trainer wasn't letting him practice backing. No one can ever conquer their incompetence if not given the chance to work on it.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Ryan asked:

Han Solo Cup,

What was he fired for? I'm not really taking his side... the only thing he said that have any sympathy for is the fact his trainer wasn't letting him practice backing. No one can ever conquer their incompetence if not given the chance to work on it.

The OP was fired for a policy violation. It's a long read...repetitive theme, etc.

But your point about being given a chance and the time to work on weaknesses is valid. Training is my biggest issue with our industry. In a highly regulated, safety centric business; training is non-standard, inconsistent and relies on the interaction of two complete strangers to reach a positive conclusion. We can debate this all day long, but the basic issue will likely always be there.

I can only suggest my approach to training from a student perspective and how I would have handled the OP's situation.

Like it or not the student is directly responsible for their success, and must take ownership of their part from day 1. No excuses. If not, they are literally at the mercy of their trainer and potentially compromise the outcome. Given the situation the OP was in, he waited too long to voice concern, seemed passive until he got on the forum.

i can only share what I experienced at Swift and cautiously assume most companies have a similar process. Every student reports to the terminal's Driver Development Manager (DDM) responsible for oversight, adherence to curriculum, and mediator if need-be. They match the trainer/mentor with the student. Everyone knows what is expected, it's in writing, documented. The DDM monitors progress and checks in with the student informally and formally. So for instance, Swift requires 40 documented backs. Both student and mentor know this. The Swift student is responsible to notify the DDM if they are not given a chance to learn and practice. It's a two way street...keep quiet and the DDM is none-the-wiser.

Not saying to call the DDM without first attempting to work it out with the mentor. If at an impass let the DDM know help is needed with an issue, like lack of backing attempts. If the situation persists, a new mentor might be assigned to the student. I was fortunate. Both my mentor and DDM were experienced top professionals.

Something clearly broke down in the OP's road trainig process, but had he voiced his concerns before the end, at least he could have attempted to positively affect his outcome. I believe he kept quiet, submitted to the authority of his trainer.

Regardless of the company the training process is many times hit or miss. However the student must take ownership of their success, holding the trainer accountable to company standards and not sit back allowing time to pass. Training is done quick, one chance. Be your own advocate and reduce the risk of failure.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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