Game: Most Shocking Aspect Of Trucker Life?

Topic 18741 | Page 2

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

Patrick said:

I never realized how much having a weekend off can hurt pay.

Yeah I think this one got me too.

I also found out the hard way that I actually really dislike being strapped to a chair for 10 hours a day every day, no matter how great the view is.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Now im thankful.and excited when a hotel or truck stop.has cheap laundry.

i get excited to see a family owned restaurant.

the smell of a clean truck de stresses me.

OtrEscapeArtist's Comment
member avatar

I would say this isn't shocking to me, more disappointing.

The lack of commradery or brotherhood. Truckers can be down right nasty to each other.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I would say this isn't shocking to me, more disappointing.

The lack of commradery or brotherhood. Truckers can be down right nasty to each other.

truckers can be downright awesome as well. i expected to be treated badly as a woman. "if you want a mans job, then dont expect help" type of thing. thats not true.

an old crabby guy yelled at me while helping me back. "you obviously havent been driving long or you wouldnt have done that. come on come on, go faster". i started crying out of frustration. he yelled more. so i hugged him and kissed him on the cheek "damn women, had to go and ruin trucking. added kissing and crying to the road."

kill them with kindness. ;)

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Seeing so many husband wife teams or at least passengers.

Chuck S.'s Comment
member avatar

I didn't realize how stupid people get around big trucks... seriously.. I was in complete disbelief...

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Never thought that when your QC or similar device says, "your destination is on the left." It might actually be on the right or around the corner.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Shocking? I can't think of anything that really shocked me, but a lot of things surprised me. I started on TT long before I pulled the trigger and started the whole process in earnest. So I was well prepared to know what to expect because of all the great advice and insight that is available here.

That being said, I was, and still am, surprised at how complicated the entire process of being a driver is. And I say that from a beginner's perspective because I'm sure the process seems less complicated as one gains experience. But there is a heck of a lot to learn in a relatively short period of time. I still get messages from my company about things I forgot to do from my tablet or MCP. I still do rookie things at shipping and receiving offices that make me feel stupid. I still get in the wrong lane or forget to turn off my signal. The good news? These things are happening less frequently as time marches on.

And that, my fellow rookies, is why it is preached over and over again here to stay the course for at least a year before making any major move.

Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

Bruce you aren't the only one that still makes dumb mistakes. I will get through crap I can't even imagine I was able to do whether it be driving through a ice storm, an Incredibly difficult backing Etc... And then I will get to a shipper or consignee and do something really stupid when it comes to dealing with paperwork, the Qualcomm... Just yesterday I had to pull into a receiver, leave the doors shut... it was kind of a tight backing but I put it right in. So proud of myself. The red light went on and I'm thinking I'm going to get out of here in no time. 5 minutes later one of the guys came out and asked me for my padlock key... I was so embarrassed period.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Cerberus 's Comment
member avatar

Honestly as someone who had just started driving last year my biggest shock was the weather, and how fast it can change on you. I knew that as a driver you had to adapt fast to many situations and boy does that happen alot. You can have several days where nothing happens and can lull you into a sense of false safety and then bam!!! Curveball! This job has taught me to be on my toes 24/7 and thats saying something since i was a correctional officer for a few years and i feel like im on my toes now driving a truck more than i ever was around convicted murderers and rapists.

Page 2 of 2 Previous Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More