How Shady Is The Industry Really? (Multiple Logbooks And Unplugging GPS Trackers?)

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Ryan R.'s Comment
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I know Brett told me that people don't run two log books anymore due to electronic logbooks, but I was just reading reviews on TMC, and I saw someone say the trainers for TMC teach recruits how to run two to three logbooks, and how to unplug their GPS unit so the company can't track their movements?

Is this kind of stuff going on rampantly, or are people making such accusations being dishonest? The reviewer depicts big business as I'm used to encountering it, so I'm prone to believing him. However, I'm attempting to delay my confirmation bias.

Please tell me this isn't true. :P

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Old School's Comment
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Ryan, I already told you that your data is flawed or skewed. Google is not your friend when it comes to researching the trucking career. It is no wonder you are having such issues becoming a truck driver.

Remember that old adage among computer programmers? "Garbage in, garbage out."

That is your biggest problem right now. Most of your "research" is merely gathering up garbage.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Dude u can't run 2 or 3 elogs. 1 is a pain already. Where are are you getting this info?

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Also, why answer how would you "unplug" the gps? It's not exactly in an outlet on the dash or something. How would you get loads if they don't know where you are? They can't get you home on the weekends if you're not showing up on the map. I would also assume you would get in some kind of trouble for something that silly.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Ryan R.'s Comment
member avatar

C T. I know they make GPS jammers for that kind of thing, but I'm unaware of whether there is any truth to unplugging them on a truck or not. It's a long winded review on indeed.com. I would gladly link to it specifically if I could, but indeed doesn't seem to support that. The interesting thing about the review is that it corroborates with certain details said here and elsewhere, while also making some fairly incriminating accusations at the same time.

I'm not defending it. I'm honestly asking if there is any truth to it.

Indeed reviews

Let us begin with the double standard about safety. The company tells you in training that they want 100% compliance with safety and book keeping, yet the trainers that you go out with will teach you about keeping two to three log books, and how to unplug your GPS on the unit to keep the company from tracking your movements. I have left the company twice, and each time when I went back to work for the company, I was given a different trainer who taught me the same thing.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Ryan R.'s Comment
member avatar

C.T.

I just watched a youtube video on installing GPS trackers in big rigs, and it confirms that it's definitely possible in some cases. They were actually installed in cab under the dashboard. (The fact it's possible doesn't mean it's actually happening as reviewed, of course.)

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Ryan you are wasting an incredible amount of your time on this sycophantic relationship you have with bad research. Your becoming a pathetic dog. Give it up man.

Saddle up and ride!

Put your hard hat on and get to work.

You're not learning a damn thing from your living room. You need to get out here and find out whether this career is going to kick you in the cajones or whether you have what it takes.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Awesome! Great way to end your career! Cut the "cord" so to speak and your employer will know, almost immediately.

The telemetry systems (like OmniTRACS) most large carriers utilize have integrated tamper detection firmware and software, local in the truck and remote. It's tight. You will get caught; terminated and depending on the extent of damage inflicted on the equipment, possibly arrested. This incident will be posted to your DAC and make it nearly impossible to ever find a future driving job. These systems are protecting up to a million dollar asset. There is also an aspect of detecting the possibility of theft. Do you really think they'd make it easy to tamper with this stuff ?

Furthermore there is zero benefit in pulling a stunt like this. Zero. The telemetry systems are part of the e-log feed, navigation...among other things.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Saddle up and ride!

Put your hard hat on and get to work.

You're not learning a damn thing from your living room. You need to get out here and find out whether this career is going to kick you in the cajones or whether you have what it takes.

That's funny because I was thinking the same exact thing this morning. This is really beginning to look like nothing more than a smokescreen of excuses from someone who isn't ready to get out there and do it for real.

I think the time for having debates and reading reviews is looooong over with. You're not trying to learn anything new reading reviews on Glassdoor and trivial baloney about cutting into truck computers. You're stalling.

Call the schools and get signed up.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar

That's funny because I was thinking the same exact thing this morning. This is really beginning to look like nothing more than a smokescreen of excuses from someone who isn't ready to get out there and do it for real.

I think the time for having debates and reading reviews is looooong over with. You're not trying to learn anything new reading reviews on Glassdoor and trivial baloney about cutting into truck computers. You're stalling.

Call the schools and get signed up.

^^^^

Seems like almost every post, is looking for reasons to talk yourself out of this career.

Are you IN OR OUT?

Rick

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