Appalachian Mountains, Questions And Concerns.

Topic 19158 | Page 1

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ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

Ok so i have been at this now for a whole 5 days, lol, im just wondering how to approach this other than go slow go slow, go slow. And i drive an auto and only have done a couple of 9% grades and one 12%. Im sure those mountains are steeper than that. So im just looking for some newbie advice. Thanks everyone.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bill F.'s Comment
member avatar

Geez, 12%? I just went down 4 miles of 8% in Soddy Daisy, TN with a full box of Nestle's water and that was bad enough. 5th gear max jakes and still had to brake.

Just fall back on your training and go extra slow. Pay no attention to local truckers who may zoom by you. They know the road.

If there is no room for other trucks to pass, turn off your CB (if you have one) that way you won't hear their nasty comments.

You can do it!

murderspolywog's Comment
member avatar

If you have done one Mt you have done them all slow down, take a deep breath and relax. Don't freak your self out, respect the Mt but do not fear it. I had a student put the truck in neutral going down Vail one time because he panicked, because the RPM on the engine was at 1700, engine brakes work the best at higher RPM s so let them climb up some and remember you can always go down to slowly with your hazards on and make it down just fine.

We're did you hit a 12 percent grade at? The most I have seen is 9 on a paved road.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

Somewhere in PA yesterday it wasnt long maybe a mile at most, it was like one of those backroad highways, two lanes of traffic and of course a stop light at the bottom of the hill. And lucky for me i have an automatic, lol, well not really, still trying to figure out how to decent hills with it, yesterday i was in 9th, out of the 12 gears, 2nd level of jakes on and it was holding at 35 quite well, but i only had 30000 lbs on me, tomorrow i will have 45000

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

Well i dont have a cb so no problem there and they really dont teach you that sort of thing, plus im from New Jersey, we dont have hills lime that there, lol. And extra slow is always the first choice if im not sure about things, ive only been doing this solo for 5 days now, lol

Geez, 12%? I just went down 4 miles of 8% in Soddy Daisy, TN with a full box of Nestle's water and that was bad enough. 5th gear max jakes and still had to brake.

Just fall back on your training and go extra slow. Pay no attention to local truckers who may zoom by you. They know the road.

If there is no room for other trucks to pass, turn off your CB (if you have one) that way you won't hear their nasty comments.

You can do it!

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

You haven't mentioned the Jake Brake®. Do you set that before you start down the hill?

In Freightliners at least, the shift paddle/lever pulls back to start the engine brakes. They​ will easily keep your speed down.

Auggie69's Comment
member avatar

Got a question for you OTR guys: I was in my POV going down a mountain in WV south of Charleston. This CRST driver was SMOKING the brakes and kept moving at about 5mph down the mountain.

I'm asking you because my routes and equipment seem to make this easy (plus never loaded down with 80K in the box) but wouldn't it be better to pull of onto the shoulder and let the brakes cool? This guy had to have known he was practically on fire. The whole valley was filled with his brake smoke.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

I run east coast so unfortunately I basically get stuck in the Appalachians every week. I have several rules I follow. Don't get off the interstate if you don't have to in WV, TN east of Nashville, PA, WV, Northwest NC, and WV lol. Also don't run out of hours there in WV if you can help it. The thing with east cost mountains is that they sneak up on you. I don't run west coast so I can't speak on those grades. But over here, the signs are posted literally right before you decend a long grade. Some of those hills on i77 are basically mini grades. My 1st time there I smoked my brakes and had to get to a rest area to cool off. You've done 9 and 12 apparently, so if you can handle those you'll be fine. Just remember, go slow and take your time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

What ever gear you went up the mountain in, go down in one gear lower. Just stay in the right lane, use your flashers and Jakes. Once you get up to your safe speed, apply the brakes for a max of 3 seconds. That should slow you down (with Jake's) to 10 mph under your safe speed.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

Yes I do, sorry just figured that was common sense, lol. I started in the first position and then went to the second position and that worked much better at holding the speed, I havent tried the third position yet, only had the truck for a week now.

You haven't mentioned the Jake Brake®. Do you set that before you start down the hill?

In Freightliners at least, the shift paddle/lever pulls back to start the engine brakes. They​ will easily keep your speed down.

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