Radios, Forklifts Questions.

Topic 19236 | Page 1

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Jonathan Bailey's Comment
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1. will truckers receive CB training in driving school? by the employer? who chooses the driver's handle? are modern CBs hands-free? Having seen mikes in the hands of truckers in many a Hollywood film, I feel it prudent to keep both hands on the wheel as much as possible.

I have to learn what all those TEN codes mean in talker (flip-flop) lingo.

2. I understand that some drivers, especially locals and regionals, may have to do some truck loading or unloading at some points during their careers. Does the trucking firm or the customer usually provide the Hyster? Will forklift operation training be provided by the driving school or employer? I have had some forklift experience in past jobs but need some brush-up. I have used pallet dollies and hand trucks too but it is so much sweeter and easier on the human spine to drive a forklift. I believe in the "work-smart" philosophy. I don't gather companies like workman's comp claims for back injury.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

1. No one is going to train you on cb operation. Basically you gotta figure it out on your own. As far as handles go you basically pick your own. You can pick up a cb that has Bluetooth connection but realistically it's just not worth it. You won't be using it enough to warrant the extra expense.

2. Local drivers will usually get a hand jack some places will load the truck with a forklift but normally it'll just be picking up a couple pallets with a hand jack n putting them in the trailer.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Jonathan there is no CB training issued by trucking companies. While you are learning this job, I'd suggest limiting talk time to only inquiries on road conditions ahead. You'll hear a lot of chatter, but every once in a while an important message will crackle with a traffic warning. In anticipation of your next question: it's up to the driver to provide, install and maintain the CB equipment.

Most of the freight hauled OTR in dry vans and reefers is no touch. On occasion you might be required to hire local labor to unload called Lumpers. Your employer will provide a mechanism to pay them. Unless you have a job doing local deliveries of food and beverage, you'll never need a pallet jack.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Jonathan Bailey's Comment
member avatar

Jonathan there is no CB training issued by trucking companies. While you are learning this job, I'd suggest limiting talk time to only inquiries on road conditions ahead. You'll hear a lot of chatter, but every once in a while an important message will crackle with a traffic warning. In anticipation of your next question: it's up to the driver to provide, install and maintain the CB equipment.

Most of the freight hauled OTR in dry vans and reefers is no touch. On occasion you might be required to hire local labor to unload called Lumpers. Your employer will provide a mechanism to pay them. Unless you have a job doing local deliveries of food and beverage, you'll never need a pallet jack.

So, G-Town, you have made things a little clearer. CBs are not "standard equipment" in the industry nor are they required. I have watched too many truck movies and have heard too many cowboy truck songs over the years.

I gather that GPS is commonplace in trucks nowadays. How about other hi-tech technologies that give drivers upcoming road conditions and weather advisories?

Do truckers still largely navigate by road map or is in-cab electronics the norm?

Does the company usually pay for the lumper out of THEIR pocket?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Jonathan Bailey's Comment
member avatar

1. No one is going to train you on cb operation. Basically you gotta figure it out on your own. As far as handles go you basically pick your own. You can pick up a cb that has Bluetooth connection but realistically it's just not worth it. You won't be using it enough to warrant the extra expense.

2. Local drivers will usually get a hand jack some places will load the truck with a forklift but normally it'll just be picking up a couple pallets with a hand jack n putting them in the trailer.

JakeBreak, I won't worry about "talkers" (CB radios) for now.

By "hand jack" you mean the "pallet dolly" I was referring to? I think they are sometimes called pallet trucks. I have used those while working at a newspaper mail room as well as driving forklifts there. I see pallet trucks in supermarkets all the time. I am not up to 'heavy lifting' with my back bone all the time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Many company trucks have in-cab electronics housed in a presentation device called a Qualcomm , aka QC. Among other things there is an integrated GPS system. Many drivers purchase their own truckers GPS as a supplement. We recommend not to rely totally on electronics for planning and navigation; a RandMcNally truckers Road Atlas is the best backup and should be used in combination with GPS for trip planning.

You will get what is called a CommData card. A lumper is typically paid with a Comm check cut at a TS using the CommData card.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Vendingdude's Comment
member avatar

I can't recall ever seeing a driver being allowed anywhere near a shipper's or receiver's forklift. Way too much risk/liabilitu. Unloaded many trucks with hand pallet jack, walk behind power jack or even the stand up pallet jacks. Once I was required to unload pallets of sugar at a receiver using a double length power jack; that didn't go so well.

Lumpers are paid cash out of your pocket and you get reimbursed later by your boss, or more commonly a Commchek is used. You will have blanks issued to you previous to delivery, and go through an authorization process to make payment.

CB is on you. Get a basic dependable model installed properly and use it wisely. A few threads here that discuss having one can save your life, save you time and maintain company contracts. It can also be a dangerous distraction and unnecessary crudity. Again, be wise.

Always have a paper trucker atlas and be able to use it. Nav systems are great but not perfect. I would bet most drivers OTR use a Garmin/Rand McNally/TomTom type device and/or Google Maps/Google Earth on phone (satellite images are very helpful). Obviously some companies have GPS integrated into elogs as well (Qualcomm).

Keep on Truckin'!

Elog:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Elogs:

Electronic Onboard Recorder

Electronic Logbook

A device which records the amount of time a vehicle has been driven. If the vehicle is not being driven, the operator will manually input whether or not he/she is on duty or not.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

Once I was required to unload pallets of sugar at a receiver using a double length power jack; that didn't go so well.

Right now I'm wishing I had been a fly on the wall watching! Did you puncture any of the sugar containers?

Vendingdude's Comment
member avatar

Big sacks, probably fifty pounds, stacked on pallets. Hanging off edge occasionally. Double jack difficult to operate in tight quarters at low speed if you don't do it every day. Lots of sugar trails from rubbing bags against each other. I was ****ed that they expected me to do their work and be perfect. Like, should I have the warehouse worker back the truck to the dock, and do I have the right to be mad if they ding the trailer?

LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

I am not allowed to touch freight. I am a driver not a lumper. I am sure my company's policy has more to do with not risking injury more than anything. I did get to help with 2 unloads yesterday. I got to put stickers on the scrap bales. Made the unload time go by quicker. This place is kinda different though. Before you can leave the dock you have to sweep your trailer. Then raise the dock plate, unlock the dock lock, and close the dock door. Beats just sitting in the truck waiting. It increases efficiency. There is not enough room for more than one 18 wheeler at a time.

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