Looking For A Change

Topic 20078 | Page 1

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Christopher M.'s Comment
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Okay so to get started I have about a year of driving experience a little short of that maybe. I played football all in highschool and messed up my knee pretty badly I can and have driven a 10 speed that's not the issue its that at the end of the day m knee is killing me especially if I get caught in traffic. Also my company is driver unload so that doesn't help at all. My question is are there any companies where I could be guaranteed an automatic truck that would have me home every 2 to 3 weeks and be no touch freight. I have talked to a few companies and the few I have talked to wont say they can guarantee me one except for us xpress. I have my tanker endorsement as well any help would be appreciated.

Minnis B.'s Comment
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Pretty sure Maverick is 100% automatics. They have a few different divisions as well if you don't feel you could sling tarps on a flatbed.

Susan D. 's Comment
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Christopher, check out West Side Transport, specifcally Network Fleet (what they call their OTR). Home every 2 weeks but can stay out longer if you want. All trucks except training trucks are autoshifts and it's all no touch freight except a multi-stop Toyota forklift load where we have to remove the wood bracing that holds the forklifts in place in the trailer. those loads are literally the only time we assist by removing the bracing and you might not get one of those for months. I used to do them all the time but hadn't been dispatched on one in 7 months or so and had a 4 stop one late last week.

As long as you have a minimum of 6 months verifiable exp they don't require you to go with a trainer, so your good there.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
OldRookie's Comment
member avatar

Check out my company, Millis. You will have no problem getting an automatic KW, T680. We are 100% no touch, dry van freight and getting home every 2-3 weeks will not be a problem with our home time gaurantee. You get 1.5 days home for every week out. If they are late getting you home, you earn an extra 5 CPM until you are home, but you will very likely never be late getting home if you request your time off properly.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Christopher M.'s Comment
member avatar

Check out my company, Millis. You will have no problem getting an automatic KW, T680. We are 100% no touch, dry van freight and getting home every 2-3 weeks will not be a problem with our home time gaurantee. You get 1.5 days home for every week out. If they are late getting you home, you earn an extra 5 CPM until you are home, but you will very likely never be late getting home if you request your time off properly.

What lanes do you normally run with millis

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Consider; large companies (like Schneider and others) that won't guarantee an automatic usually have no-touch freight. That should get you considerable relief ****il you get an automatic) AND they're transitioning to automatic, so you could probably be in one within 12-18 months. Schneider put me in a brand new one in 9 months. I ran my butt off for the from the beginning. I think that helped. But I never unloaded a trailer in two years. Plus I was usually home every 2-3 weeks.

Good luck!

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

So long as you have more 6+ months of experience, CalArk will look at your application. We are a 100% automatic fleet, no-touch freight and I would say 60%+ drop and hook. If you have less than a year of experience, they'll have you go with a trainer for 40 hours. It's more assessing your abilities and brushing up on anything you may be iffy on.

Depending on where you live, you have the option to go home once per week for a reset. We run primarily Midwest lanes, some Northeast, some Southeast, and a tiny bit of the LA area. But I've only been to California twice in 8 months. I've heard that there are a few Northwest runs, but I've never seen one.

All our trucks are governed at 70 with the exception of the lightweight Prostars. Those are governed at 75 with and extra .02 cpm bonus.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
OldRookie's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Check out my company, Millis. You will have no problem getting an automatic KW, T680. We are 100% no touch, dry van freight and getting home every 2-3 weeks will not be a problem with our home time gaurantee. You get 1.5 days home for every week out. If they are late getting you home, you earn an extra 5 CPM until you are home, but you will very likely never be late getting home if you request your time off properly.

double-quotes-end.png

What lanes do you normally run with millis

I'm OTR , solo for a little over one year. We have about 800 trucks, all KW. Millis is privately held, family owned and run since the 30s.

We typically don't go west of Minnesota/Texas, although I have run to Colorado. We also seldom go to the Northeast, although I have been to Long Island and Union New Jersey. You get paid extra for New York and I think you can refuse it if you want. We also don't do much Florida, although I have run to Orlando. Other than those areas, we run pretty much all over the Midwest, South and Mid-Atlantic.

We haul a lot of adult beverages... from breweries to distributors, distributors to breweries, breweries to breweries, distributors to distributors, etc. In addition, we haul a lot of things relating to the production of said, e.g. glass, paper, etc. We also haul many other things, not relating to beverages, but you will notice our terminals are all close to a large brewery.

There is info on this site about Millis and the Millis web site has a lot of what you may want to know. Also, you can just call recruiting and they will answer your questions.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

CFI can make sure you only have an autoshift. They are in the process of switching the whole fleet to KW-680 autoshifts. We run the whole 48. However, they have some regional and local driving positions. We have a terminal in West Memphis AK. I don't know how far that is from you. However, location doesn't matter for most positions. You get one day hometime for every seven days out. You also earn PTO time. Home time is guaranteed. I believe you have to give at least 8 days notice. If they know you want to be home more often, they will probably keep you running around that area. That is just what I have heard. If all you have is six months expierence, they may send you with a trainer for a bit. Fresh out of training I was with my trainer for about three weeks. I drove about 8000 miles during that time. You can see all the info about pay and bonuses on their website. This is a link to their pay and bonus page. We have a good amount of drop hooks. You are required to sweep out your trailer, if you have an empty. Today, I had to lay some mats and cardboard on the trailer floor and nail the bracing in. That's the most physical labor I have done here. If you find any nails or bracing left after a delivery, you would have to remove them. You are supplied with a nice crowbar for that. I have yet to had to do that. Most of my day is spent driving. Good luck to you.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

I like how this thread has turned into sales pitches for the companies people are currently driving for. That's encouraging, and I sincerely mean that.

I'm a little confused by your mention of "no touch freight" and having a tänker endorsement. Most tanker jobs require some physical work, including handling hoses to connect for loading and unloading, and for some, climbing up to the top of the tank to vent it. What do you mean by "no touch?" Anything less than flatbed, or literally 99% drop and hook box work? (I will say that a buddy of mine just started a sweet job hauling drop and hook hazmat tankers for a subcontractor of Quality Carriers, but those jobs are few and far between.)

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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