Looking For A Change

Topic 20078 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
I like how this thread has turned into sales pitches for the companies people are currently driving for. That's encouraging, and I sincerely mean that.

I'm also happy to see this. And it's all different companies hauling different types of freight and everything. It really goes to show that you can be happy and successful at any of these major carriers if you're doing your job at the highest level and you stick around long enough to earn a great reputation and learn how your company operates.

smile.gif

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I like how this thread has turned into sales pitches for the companies people are currently driving for. That's encouraging, and I sincerely mean that.

double-quotes-end.png

I'm also happy to see this. And it's all different companies hauling different types of freight and everything. It really goes to show that you can be happy and successful at any of these major carriers if you're doing your job at the highest level and you stick around long enough to earn a great reputation and learn how your company operates.

smile.gif

So many people come into Trucking Truth and say "I've heard XXX Trucking is a really bad company." They don't realize these stories are posted by the losers who quit or got fired.

This is the place where members are actually proud of their company. I won't hesitate to talk up Swift, ChickieMonster endorses CalArk, Old Rookie recommends Millis. There's no shortage of "Primates" here.

So, yes, it's wonderful that we all work for great companies. This just makes it harder for new people to make their choice!

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Christopher M.'s Comment
member avatar

I like how this thread has turned into sales pitches for the companies people are currently driving for. That's encouraging, and I sincerely mean that.

I'm a little confused by your mention of "no touch freight" and having a tänker endorsement. Most tanker jobs require some physical work, including handling hoses to connect for loading and unloading, and for some, climbing up to the top of the tank to vent it. What do you mean by "no touch?" Anything less than flatbed, or literally 99% drop and hook box work? (I will say that a buddy of mine just started a sweet job hauling drop and hook hazmat tankers for a subcontractor of Quality Carriers, but those jobs are few and far between.)

I had to have my tanker endorsement for my first job we healed containers of fluid and I was required to get the tanker endorsement for that and by no touch freight all I mean is no driver unload

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bud A.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I like how this thread has turned into sales pitches for the companies people are currently driving for. That's encouraging, and I sincerely mean that.

I'm a little confused by your mention of "no touch freight" and having a tänker endorsement. Most tanker jobs require some physical work, including handling hoses to connect for loading and unloading, and for some, climbing up to the top of the tank to vent it. What do you mean by "no touch?" Anything less than flatbed, or literally 99% drop and hook box work? (I will say that a buddy of mine just started a sweet job hauling drop and hook hazmat tankers for a subcontractor of Quality Carriers, but those jobs are few and far between.)

double-quotes-end.png

I had to have my tanker endorsement for my first job we healed containers of fluid and I was required to get the tanker endorsement for that and by no touch freight all I mean is no driver unload

Got it, thanks. No driver unload eliminates most tanker jobs, right?

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Christopher M.'s Comment
member avatar

So long as you have more 6+ months of experience, CalArk will look at your application. We are a 100% automatic fleet, no-touch freight and I would say 60%+ drop and hook. If you have less than a year of experience, they'll have you go with a trainer for 40 hours. It's more assessing your abilities and brushing up on anything you may be iffy on.

Depending on where you live, you have the option to go home once per week for a reset. We run primarily Midwest lanes, some Northeast, some Southeast, and a tiny bit of the LA area. But I've only been to California twice in 8 months. I've heard that there are a few Northwest runs, but I've never seen one.

All our trucks are governed at 70 with the exception of the lightweight Prostars. Those are governed at 75 with and extra .02 cpm bonus.

Thank you for recommending calark I just got off the phone with Shelley in recruiting talked to her for about half an hour I liked everything she was telling me. She wasn't trying to sell me on the company. I am convinced it's where I'll be headed very shortly so again thank you

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Shiva's Comment
member avatar

I like how this thread has turned into sales pitches for the companies people are currently driving for. That's encouraging, and I sincerely mean that.

I'm a little confused by your mention of "no touch freight" and having a tänker endorsement. Most tanker jobs require some physical work, including handling hoses to connect for loading and unloading, and for some, climbing up to the top of the tank to vent it. What do you mean by "no touch?" Anything less than flatbed, or literally 99% drop and hook box work? (I will say that a buddy of mine just started a sweet job hauling drop and hook hazmat tankers for a subcontractor of Quality Carriers, but those jobs are few and far between.)

Some customers have liquid loaded in totes, barrels or just plain bottled water and won't let you pull there freight without a tanker endorsement.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar
It really goes to show that you can be happy and successful at any of these major carriers if you're doing your job at the highest level and you stick around long enough to earn a great reputation and learn how your company operates.

Brett hit the nail on the head with this one as we say. ^^^THIS^^^ is 100% what I plan to do here at CRST Expedited for as long as I am with them (This will be a MINIMUM of 1 YEAR, however I hope I can stay with them the rest of my career). I hope I get to meet my driver manager tomorrow. I am so excited!

smile.gif

Driver Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar
This is the place where members are actually proud of their company.

Errol, you hit the nail on the head with this one. I have driven for quite a few companies and so far CRST has impressed me the most of them all. In case you are wondering: I have been with: USA Truck, Trans AM (both as company and an L/O), Stevens Transport, Schneider National, JS Helwig and Son, Swift Transportation, Werner Enterprises, and now I am RESTARTING my career through NADTA (North American Driver Training Academy) and CRST. So far, I will ENDORSE CRST above them all, however They ALL have their great points, however If I were to go back to ANY one of them AFTER my new FIRST year is UP with CRST, then out of the above list I would choose in this order: Werner, Swift, then Schneider, and the others WHILE I had some good points, I probably wouldn't end up going back to the others for reasons I don't wish to explain unless a Moderator asks me first. However if you want me to list the good points about the others and all of these, let me know and I will make another reply to this topic doing that.

This is the reason why I REALLY wish I had found this site BEFORE I went into trucking the first time. Those first 7 I drove for in the span of 2.5 yrs. HOWEVER this time I PLAN to do it ALL right with CRST for that ever important first year. However to get the others off of my record, I would have to stay with CRST 10 years. I hope to be able to do that. Brett, you already know about this because I have e-mailed you my resume when I was still living in Davenport.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

So long as you have more 6+ months of experience, CalArk will look at your application. We are a 100% automatic fleet, no-touch freight and I would say 60%+ drop and hook. If you have less than a year of experience, they'll have you go with a trainer for 40 hours. It's more assessing your abilities and brushing up on anything you may be iffy on.

Depending on where you live, you have the option to go home once per week for a reset. We run primarily Midwest lanes, some Northeast, some Southeast, and a tiny bit of the LA area. But I've only been to California twice in 8 months. I've heard that there are a few Northwest runs, but I've never seen one.

All our trucks are governed at 70 with the exception of the lightweight Prostars. Those are governed at 75 with and extra .02 cpm bonus.

double-quotes-end.png

Thank you for recommending calark I just got off the phone with Shelley in recruiting talked to her for about half an hour I liked everything she was telling me. She wasn't trying to sell me on the company. I am convinced it's where I'll be headed very shortly so again thank you

Hey Great! This is awesome to hear! Keep me posted for sure and hopefully I'll see you in Little Rock soon!

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Christopher M.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

So long as you have more 6+ months of experience, CalArk will look at your application. We are a 100% automatic fleet, no-touch freight and I would say 60%+ drop and hook. If you have less than a year of experience, they'll have you go with a trainer for 40 hours. It's more assessing your abilities and brushing up on anything you may be iffy on.

Depending on where you live, you have the option to go home once per week for a reset. We run primarily Midwest lanes, some Northeast, some Southeast, and a tiny bit of the LA area. But I've only been to California twice in 8 months. I've heard that there are a few Northwest runs, but I've never seen one.

All our trucks are governed at 70 with the exception of the lightweight Prostars. Those are governed at 75 with and extra .02 cpm bonus.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Thank you for recommending calark I just got off the phone with Shelley in recruiting talked to her for about half an hour I liked everything she was telling me. She wasn't trying to sell me on the company. I am convinced it's where I'll be headed very shortly so again thank you

double-quotes-end.png

Hey Great! This is awesome to hear! Keep me posted for sure and hopefully I'll see you in Little Rock soon!

Just finished talking to Shelley again and got everything going set up for me to start in 2 weeks I wanted to start sooner but I have a run from east tennessee to Washington Oregon and California this load I'm taking has 21 stops so I'll be out there for a while but as soon as I get home I'll be heading too little Rock to say in excited is an under statement so thank you can't wait to get out there and prove my worth to get good miles

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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