Praying This Goes Through And Well!

Topic 21566 | Page 1

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Victor C. II's Comment
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I may well be headed to my next trucking company, it is a family owned company and they are good to their employees. I have listened to other employees. My main excitment is all in the fact that, they pay $.46 a mile, $25 a stop after the first one, $50 for back hauls plus the $.46 a mile pay, and if I unload the trailer myself it is $60. As far as I know I will have most weekends off but that is up in the air because I am not sure. Holidays are paid.

Here is the best part yet, I will be trained fully, by the director or an really experienced driver. So I will be staying with the trainer until I get it down well and I am not going to be left in the air. Thanking the.Lord for the chance to interview with these people. Im not going to name the company till I am 100% sure of everything.

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Victor C. II's Comment
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What is neat is that I called and automatically got a interview. Thats a blessing!

Victor C. II's Comment
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Does anyone know much about them?

Daniel B.'s Comment
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Does anyone know much about them?

We don't know, you haven't told us the name of the company.

Victor C. II's Comment
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The name is Wholesome Foods.

G-Town's Comment
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Victor,...I wish you luck.

Ask questions during your interview:

- how long is the training?

- will you have an assigned route, or will it be random?

- how many stops are on a trailer?

- what types of customers do they service; grocery stores, institutional, convenience stores and/or restaurants?

- is the load all one temp, or is the trailer a multi-zone temp?

The reason for the above; depending on the answers, your learning curve is likely effected. I can almost guarantee you'll be facing many close quarter maneuvering puzzles and tight delivery schedules. This will challenge your skill and nerve.

It sounds similar to Rob's job. Not sure if you have read his diary or not, but it spells out what you might expect.

Victor C. II's Comment
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Wow okay I will. Got an question, how long should I wait till I call them back if they say that they would call me yesterday or today? Call them tomorrow?

G-Town's Comment
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Wow okay I will. Got an question, how long should I wait till I call them back if they say that they would call me yesterday or today? Call them tomorrow?

I'd call them late in the day if you haven't heard back.

Han Solo Cup (aka, Pablo)'s Comment
member avatar

If they said they'd call yesterday/today, then I'd wait till around 3 pm today. That's late enough to give them plenty of time but catches them before they're likely gone for the day. You can always fashion a deflection/excuse like "sorry, I left my phone at home and thought I might have missed your call so I just wanted to check in." Good luck.

Old School's Comment
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Victor, I've probably been your biggest cheerleader in this forum. I've patted you on the back when you did well, and I've scolded you when you messed up, but I've always put your best interest at the heart of my comments. I hope you realize that.

We've worked with you a lot. We've given you a lot of great advice. You've struggled a bit with engaging yourself in our methods for success. You've struggled at trucking, and there's nobody that understands that any more than us. We even felt bad for you when you got let go from your first trucking job. We, of all people, know how difficult it is to make a good start at this.

Do you remember saying this to me in the past when I was trying to discourage you from some boneheaded decision you were contemplating?

Old School you are like my favorite moderator among a couple others that have taken me under their wings and when I messed up scolded me and then lifted me up again and have given me new hope for the brighter future!

Well, as The Terminator would say, " I'm baaaack!"

I honestly don't think this is a good opportunity for you. Think back on the issues that got you dismissed from Swift. Do you really think you're prepared for a local food delivery job? Those things are crazy demanding! I honestly wouldn't want that job for myself. I think you're trying to put the final nail in your trucking career coffin. I don't like this idea.

Look at your reason for choosing this job...

it is a family owned company and they are good to their employees.

This is one of the biggest misconceptions we try to teach people about. Victor, you are still a beginner. You have very little experience, and even less success at this. Now you want to take on one of the most demanding truck driving jobs with crazy hours and a lot of tight spots to put your big rig. Duhhh, do you remember what got you in trouble when you were over the road? I do. It was tight spots in a big rig. You hit a few things.

A small family owned company cannot help you pay closer attention to detail, nor can they instill the necessary discipline needed to perform at the highest levels in this job. We always try to get people to start at a large carrier doing over the road , and stick with that for a minimum of one year of safe driving. That is just simply the best way to get yourself trained in this career. It gradually exposes you to all the little nuances and issues that drivers face in this career. I know you are sold on this job because as you put it...

Here is the best part yet, I will be trained fully, by the director or an really experienced driver. So I will be staying with the trainer until I get it down well and I am not going to be left in the air.

I remember you thinking your training from Swift was insufficient. Here's a news flash! Smaller companies cannot afford to keep on training you until you "get it down well." There are thousands of scenarios in this career that you will never encounter in your training - this job is going to require you to "think on your feet," much more so than being over the road with a large carrier.

I don't like this opportunity. Personally, I think you should get an Over The Road job and make that happen safely for at least a year with no accidents. How hard do you think you are going to make it on yourself if you get released from this job because your trailer scraped up against somebody's car parked at a restaurant you were delivering to? Then you'd have two companies that let you go for playing bumper cars out here in a big rig.

The reason I don't like this decision is simply that I think it lacks prudence.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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