Took The Next Step

Topic 21832 | Page 1

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Kevin L.'s Comment
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As many of you know. Ive been working to make a better life for myself and my family by getting back into trucking after a few decades. I gave notice at two jobs the fitst week in January or so. Now im on my way to little rock arkansas for orientation that begins this Sunday at 7 am. This was a huge step for me but a necessary one. I feel confident they will teach me how to operate safely and run a truck profitably among other things. My job is to learn as much as I can and be grateful and respectful to all those that guide me along this path.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
andhe78's Comment
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Good luck. I was in your position three months ago with the same company-while the process may seem long at times (I didn’t get home for two months) it’s worth it the day you get your truck.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Sounds great! Best of luck to ya and I certainly hope you'll keep us updated on your progress.

PackRat's Comment
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Great news to read!good-luck.gif

Kevin L.'s Comment
member avatar

Sorry about the delay in posting at this point it will be mostly from memory but it is still pretty clear.

I got on the bus thursday at 430 pm in scranton pa to go to little rock for orientation. It was a very long bus ride for me. At times just being that cramped up i was having a lot of knee pain. I arrived in little rock at 1245am saturday morning. Upon arrival at the training facility i was given a welcome package wich had a maverick id with a large O on it where othets had their pictures. The papers inside were basically the info i had heard from the recruiter and some basic rules like you have to have your maverick id. Visible at all timrs on the property. Shortly after I woke up they had a van going to walmart so i got on it. I learned fast here that because of the limited vans here trips are limited to one hour round trip. That leaves about 10 mins to actually get your stuff and get checked out. They say orientation is 7 am on sunday but you want to be there just prior to 630 am for breakfast. They gave us training tablets and charging wires. You can access many of their training videos and pdf files. The first day was basically more explaination of rules and policies. They give you a pocket fmcsr we learned about a few things we also started trip planning and had some for homework. Then on monday most of the day was the dot physical and we got our photo ids. The actual physical was not nearly as detailed as i thought it would be. The agility test incuded 3 minutes paced on a raised step. Lifting w weighted box onto an off a table lifting a weighted box to my chin. It also checked and measured the distance betwee my finger reaching behind my back. They also had me do some calf lifts and kneel and squat as well as get into truck and out of truck and raise and lower the hood of the truck. And had to move weights from a box on one side to another box on the other side and back with two hand at all times. They measued how much i could twist foward and backwards right and left at waist and neck basically they check and measure your flexabuility at several joints. They did urine and hair drug testing. They say they take an inch of hair but it seems like about 3 inches worth to me.monday you do not get breakfast either but you get lunch. Do not expect your days to be only 8 hrs they are closer to 🔟 or more tuesday was filled with more videos, lectures and mapping along with a few quizes. Homework is assigned regularly orientation week. It usually was watching videos and trip mapping in your atlas. Also on monday when they give you your photo id they give you a $ 50 mastercard that expires in like a month. Tuesday was more mapping hos logging and videos the and wednesday afternoon we started hands on securement training. Thursday morning i believe we went in morning to the orientation class for one more quiz then lined up for a fist bump with company to welcome us to maverick then we were walked over to administration to meet our recruiter and then took lunch and went to the company store then back to hands on classroom. The hands on securement training was basically we would watch videos or listen to slide show lectures then go to the training bays and try and do what we saw in the videos. Various videos may have quizes and you will digitally sign releases for each. By Friday morning before class we had to move all of our stuff into a closet and we were homeless until probably around 3 Friday afternoon at which time they moved us to a hotel about three-quarters of a mile away. Prior to this we have been staying in the Maverick Motel which is on their compound or campus however you want to see it. The Days Inn where they have a staying now has televisions in each room there is also plenty of places nearby to get something to eat the gas station across the street offers a discount to all Maverick employees at the iron skillet. The pilot Truck Stop has a subway and also offers maverick discount. Flatbed securement will have its final on Tuesday afternoon and then you will spend about a day and a half tarping loads when that is complete you will be sent to a trainer truck or glass training or if you have experience you can test into your own truck. At this point I have just passed my securement final. Tomorrow i will be turning in my training tablet and tarping all day.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey man, welcome aboard officially. I see not much has changed since I got there. Only difference is the tablet. We had giant binders with pictures and notes for all the securements. Be sure to get up early for the second week. If you over sleep you'll be stranded there or have to use the hotel shuttle. That would make you late, which they do not like. I was actually at the terminal last week on Thursday but didn't go in or anything. When you finally get your truck, be sure to go directly to the wash or have it washed at the beacon down the road. They want those trucks cleaned regularly. Also, as you may have noticed, that pilot up the road is a disaster to get in and out of. I always try to fuel up else where so I can avoid that dump at all cost. Good luck and don't forget to ask lots of questions.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Kevin L.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks ct yes i figured out about the transportation issues early on. Far as that giant binder I have seen them but never had to use them. They gave us a folder with like 16 pages in it with securements. I just took my secruements final yesterday so al thats left that I know of is tarping and going out with trainer for me. Im kind of glad I decided to go flatbed over glass after hearing some of Merles stories. The idea he said glass loads are a minimum of 4 hours to load and secure made me think there goes the money. At this point though I am looking forward to getting out with a trainer and getting some miles in and practice. With practice I believe will come efficiency and that brings money. I just hope I get a great trainer that has patience

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes live loading glass takes a while from what I hear, but they also have lots of preload and deadheading. I think you'll be happy with either one. Most trainers here are good at what they do, but with any company there are bound to be a few bad apples. Don't worry too much about tarping there at the facility, you'll get the basics there and your trainer will show you the rest. Once you go solo you'll have to practice and put it all together. I'm still learning myself.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Kevin L.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok today is Wednesday and spent the majority of hands on tarping and folding tarps. Thing is i was a part of a group of 4 people all tarping the same load. Which while it is a great training experience it is nothing like having to do it on my own. This afternoon we met with logistics who told us who our trainers were and what their status is. We also learned where our trainers live and we will likely be meeting them in the next few days. Our trainers ideally would live within 150 miles of us. I live in North Scranton, PA my trainer lives in Wayne, WV way more than 150 miles so when he takes home time i will be in a motel near his place. Im working through a lot of fears of failure as its been so long since I drove tt. I know my personal relationship will be stressed the longer i spend in training. Ive been talking to my gf and have decided I just need to stay out as long as it takes to be safe and confident.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

I was in the same situation with my trainer- had to stay at a hotel when he went home. But I kind of enjoyed it, gave me time to do laundry, unwind, and just enjoy some privacy every weekend. Better than one guy in my class whose trainer stayed out the entire time. Fortunately my wife was pretty cool especially since it was two months before I got home. But we knew we were working towards a better situation. We knew a little sacrifice and time apart would lead to an improved future, and it did. You both have to keep your eye on the prize. It’s worth it. As for the tarping, that is just something that comes with time. I’m still horrible at it, but every load is getting better.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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