Arams Diary!!

Topic 22043 | Page 8

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Aram KURD's Comment
member avatar

Oh and forgot to mention 93% of the loads at total were drop and hook...the only live loads were paper from new Jersey and Pepsi in Pennsylvania. Can't beat that...also no reefer is a plus!!

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Anyways all the negative bull**** aside

My question is when can we stop listening to your BS? You picked a company based on splitting the bonus with your buddy? What a dumb reason.

You're moving all the time "because he's an owner operator?" I've got news for you - we have an entire forum full of company drivers that are moving all the time.

You tell brand new drivers to leave a company right away if they "feel" it's not a good fit and to "trust your gut". How the heck can you "trust your gut" when you're so new to the industry you need a trainer to hold your hand? You've never driven a truck solo a mile in your life but you think you have good instincts for choosing a company? Do you really feel you're qualified to be giving career advice when you're still training for this career yourself?

You didn't leave the company because you trusted your gut. You left the company because you fell for the BS that some terminal rats fed you. They can't figure out how to make their way in this industry so they blamed the company and you believed them. Those aren't good instincts. They're quite the opposite in fact. You should know better than to take career advice from people who haven't figured out how to be successful in their career.

Yeah, we're done with this conversation. It's amazing how many people there are with no knowledge or experience but think they have it all figured out. In fact, they even think they're qualified to start advising others on their career path, recommending that they quit their first company right away if their gut tells them it's the right move. That's utter nonsense.

In reality you're still at zero but in your mind you're already a hero somehow. Well good luck to you with that. You're gonna need it.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Aram you wrote this to the forum about 5-6 weeks ago...your words my friend:

Gotcha, I figured it was a little fishy. Thanks for the tip. Man I'm glad I registered on this forum, you guys have been a great help.

You wrote that...exact words.

So now, after such a short time you have become a self-proclaimed expert, a contrarian calling us ridiculous, negative and full of sh**? Based on what?

Wisdom comes with experience and knowledge; requiring years, not weeks to acquire.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

LOL....I love this forum.....

Aram KURD's Comment
member avatar

I really don't understand what's the problem here? I've landed a great gig, I'm happy, my dispatcher is awesome and so far this week I've got 2500 miles, our payweek ends on Wednesday so I'm about to add another 288 to that. All but one of my loads this week were drop and hook. What's the problem? Why did I make such a big mistake? Where did I make such a big mistake? I'm happy, I'm loving life out here. Total has been extremely good to me, I even got a courtesy call from the owner. He calls every new recruit while they're solo on their first week, which is a great gesture. And Brett, dude relax, the only reason I was saying we kept moving cuz he was an owner op is because the company driver trainers at Total are salary. They can run 500 miles a week and still get 70k per year. I'm a company driver and plan on staying company.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Great Aram!!! im happy for you.

I think what you failed to see is what we saw in your posts. Go back and re read what we saw...which is only what you told us. only you know what is in your head or going on, we only know what you told us. you were gung ho about one company, then what seemed like whiplash, you said you left there because they lied about pay, they made you watch videos, and you did not trust trailers coming across the border. it sounded like a rash decision and future companies can look negatively about that. we were concerned for you.

for us, those all sounded like BS excuses. The pay was "up to $50k" as stated on the site, videos are required by almost every company and are often a DOT or USDA requirement, and the trailers are already inspected by customs with dogs and x rays.

Now had you come one with something that we dont all go through regularly, maybe it would have gotten a different response.

i wish you luck and am glad you have found a home. please give it a full year there and learn to manage that clock. that is how you will make that money honey lol

good-luck.gif

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Aram KURD's Comment
member avatar

Thank you, Rainy! I understand what you mean but honestly some of these guys made it seem like my career was over before it began lol. One guy even said I feel entitled because I have a CDL , smh. I agree i could've and should've done more research before heading to Stevens, but i had just got my CDL everything was fresh in my head, muscle memory, so I wanted to be in a truck quick. In my head I thought I had done enough research. But I swear my decision to leave Stevens was purely for my future and not some chump change referral bonus like these guys claim. The day before I was to meet my trainer I learned about those trailers coming across from Mexico. Sergeant majors (instructor at Steven's) words were "you better inspect that trailer good because a mile down the road you'll go through an xray machine and if there's drugs it's on you" now I don't know about you but I'm not willing to risk anything. I've got too many people depending on me. And I've already explained the bonus pay and videos so I won't go into that again. But most importantly I love it here at Total, I feel right at home. Great small company that's getting me good miles. My trainer calls me daily to check upon me. My dispatcher and terminal manager are on a first name basis with me which makes you feel like you belong. Just yesterday I got dispatched a load that was late and they offered me an extra $100 bucks if i could deliver it that day. I can't say enough good things about them. I plan on staying for a good while.

Great Aram!!! im happy for you.

I think what you failed to see is what we saw in your posts. Go back and re read what we saw...which is only what you told us. only you know what is in your head or going on, we only know what you told us. you were gung ho about one company, then what seemed like whiplash, you said you left there because they lied about pay, they made you watch videos, and you did not trust trailers coming across the border. it sounded like a rash decision and future companies can look negatively about that. we were concerned for you.

for us, those all sounded like BS excuses. The pay was "up to $50k" as stated on the site, videos are required by almost every company and are often a DOT or USDA requirement, and the trailers are already inspected by customs with dogs and x rays.

Now had you come one with something that we dont all go through regularly, maybe it would have gotten a different response.

i wish you luck and am glad you have found a home. please give it a full year there and learn to manage that clock. that is how you will make that money honey lol

good-luck.gif

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Aram you completely missed most of Rainy's points. At least you are consistent.

You really don't understand...and your advice to other newbies to leave a company during orientation on a gut-feel is just plain wrong.

Good luck. You are going to need it.

Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
member avatar

Aram, You started this thread asking for advice or the backing of valuable experienced drivers. They all wished you well, gave some great advice and comments to your questions. You chose to go down a different path and good luck to you but remember if you are that thin skinned because you did not get 100% response to your choice please do not complain here or try and beat up these professionals. Most of us have "been there, done that" and tried to guide you through your decision and reasons for doing it even if it is right or wrong. The choice is yours and yours alone and we all hope you are successful in the decision you made. Just lighten up. Good luck man

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Harry the Navy Pop-pop wrote:

Aram, You started this thread asking for advice or the backing of valuable experienced drivers. They all wished you well, gave some great advice and comments to your questions. You chose to go down a different path and good luck to you but remember if you are that thin skinned because you did not get 100% response to your choice please do not complain here or try and beat up these professionals. Most of us have "been there, done that" and tried to guide you through your decision and reasons for doing it even if it is right or wrong. The choice is yours and yours alone and we all hope you are successful in the decision you made. Just lighten up. Good luck man

All true. Except one additional thing,... Arum's replies became indignant, arrogant, angry and to several of us, disrespectful. You basically flipped-us-off, all of us.

Aram this forum offers you a valuable free service that can at times save a rookie driver from making and quickly recovering from the usual mistakes. If you come in here and act like a collosal asshat (like you did), except to be treated as such or just ignored.

Like Pop-pop suggested, chill out.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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