How Many Miles Would I Get At Roehl?

Topic 22195 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Nate M.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi everyone! I'm interested in a trucking career and I'm looking at Roehl's Get your CDL program. I know that Roehl has a good training program and I know their starting per mile rate is good but I have heard horror stories about new drivers getting very few miles (one person said they were only making $100 per week). I was hoping I could get this straight from the horse's mouth so to speak, so any current or former Roehl employees who can speak to this, or any recent graduates of the training program who are driving solo, that you'll be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
How many miles would I get at Roehl?

Nate, welcome to Trucking Truth!

It's pretty obvious you have been poking around on the internet for answers and have come up feeling a little nervous about making a final decision on how and where to get your new trucking career started. Welcome to our world!

While we can't possibly answer your question with a specific answer, we can point you in the right direction so that you won't have to fear things like being mistreated in an industry that makes it's money by keeping it's drivers busy. Trucking is a performance based business that rewards those who understand how to get things done. You are going to find a lot of cry-babies on the internet who got what they deserved from the trucking industry. The problem is that you will only hear their side of the story. In a performance based business, though it may sound odd to you at this point in your research, the employees get what they deserve. In other words they get rewarded for their performance. Therefore it is important that we not focus on the company that we are going to work for, but on the work ethic we are going to put forth as we pursue this career.

Would it surprise you if I told you that we have some very happy, prosperous, and successful drivers in our forum who work for Swift? I thought it might, and the reason I even bring that up as an example is to point out to you the bias that you may have picked up from your reading online. Seriously, we have drivers in here who are making great money and are treated very well at Swift, and all the other major carriers. Truck drivers who do well at this job are doing well because they put forth a lot of effort, thus making sure they are getting what they deserve. I can't stress this enough. If you perform like a safe efficient professional, you will always have plenty to do, and be turning those big miles. In this business professionals are treated like professionals.

Take a look at these two articles and see if they help you understand the concepts I am trying to share with you.

Do I Have What It Takes To Make It In Trucking?

What It Takes To Be A Top Tier Driver

We also would highly recommend the following reading materials:

Again, I welcome you to our forum, and I hope we will hear some more from you. Feel free to join in on our discussions, and air out any questions that you have. We shoot straight, and we know how this whole career works. We are all drivers who deal with these issues on a daily basis. We don't sugar coat anything, and we always tell you the truth. Welcome aboard!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

JT's Comment
member avatar

Hi Nate and welcome aboard. I am new here myself and considering Roehl as well. Let me tell you, you will get what you are looking for here. Stay away from those review sites, employee review sites and so on because your brain will get so wrapped around the axle you won't know what direction to turn. Like Old School said this profession, as is the case with most any job, you get out of it what you put in to it. Unfortunately we have a society now that expects a paycheck just because they showed up for work. Check out the materials on here. You will get a wealth of really good information.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Welcome Nate, I am a graduate of Roehl’s school. I went through in 2013 in Marshfield. I did a diary on it back then and I know there are some more recent ones. Your right their school is top notch. I understand they have more locations these days also. They have 3 divisions, dry van , reefer , and flatbed/curtainside. As Old School said this isca performance based business. Your DM will keep you as busy as they believe you can handle. At first it will be an easier pace and as you gain experience and can handle it they will keep uping the miles. I don’t know where you live if all divisions would be available to you. When I was there the DM’s actually got a commission based on their drivers miles, so they want to keep you moving as much as possible. They have several hometime options and depending on how long you stay out will dictate how far away from your home. The longer you stay out the easier the scheduling is and the availabilty of loads. Just an estimate your probably looking at around 2200-2500 a week. I was doing 3400 a week but I was on a dedicated from south georgia to canada and back. They no longer have that contract. 3400 a week in a 64 moh goverened truck is getting it done.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Nate...I run for Roehl on a dedicated account. I just got home for my weekly reset.

Like others have said. If you’re a producer, you will get the miles. I’ve run 3000, 2900, 3100, 1600, 2600 miles. Mind you, I run 5-1/2 days then go home. The 1600 is an anomaly as I was on a short week. They had asked me to take a load to Jacksonville, In return I couldn’t get home for my weekly reset...so they gave me a 3-1/2 day reset the following week. Anyhow....

I highly recommend Roehl and their excellent Get your CDL program. Many of the specifics have changed since I got mine in 2014 (i never was paid during training). There is another graduate on here Neal ...he’s more recent. Hopefully he’ll see this and chime in.

Good luck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Joseph D.'s Comment
member avatar

Roehl was my first trucking job. I was on a dedicated account did 2500-3000 miles a week. Midwest region. Home weekly. Great company best of luck. Remember, you get out what you put in. Work hard, be safe.

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

I worked at Roehl for 2 and a half years. I would still be there if the wife didn't want me home more lol. I was averaging 2500-3000 miles a week. As long as your on time they will run you as hard as you want to run.

Nate M.'s Comment
member avatar

Well I went ahead and finished up my application to Roehl today, so I'm hoping I hear something soon. I'm told they are usually pretty quick?

PJ's Comment
member avatar

They are, call the recruitning line and ask for Kim Calhoun. She is awesome

Nate M.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, Roehl declined my application. Are there any other companies that not only provide your CDL training, but also pay you while you're in training like Roehl does?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Roehl Transport Truck Driver Salary
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More