DAC Report? Need Help, Please!

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Splitter's Comment
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Like I stated above its the law that you document each and every employer whether its a week or a day, your SS# is linked to them unless you are on 1099, then at the end of the year the IRS will find out, and then your SS# is linked. There are companies that will find out and there are ones that won’t. Honesty is the best policy and when it comes to being 100% truthful on basically a document that is going to be submitted to the FMCSA most likely. I would err on the side of caution and list em, but with an explanation.

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Ok, I need a little clarification on this:

I’m a rookie, and went to a particular company’s orientation. They gave me a physical, and I pee’ed in their cup. I signed their forms (stuff like I wouldn’t abandon their truck, steal a load, etc). Before orientation was over they said they couldn’t offer employment because my state CDL (no corrective lenses req’d) didn’t match my DOT medical (corrective lenses required). I was there 4 days and did 2 backing drills/assessments. Did I work for them or not? Do I have to list them of any future application? I don’t want to appear dishonest going forward.

Thomas, in my case, I wasn’t a full employee until I passed my CDL exams. I’m thinking this is the same for your scenario. But if you really want your CDL then fix that discrepancy with your papers & keep it moving. Good luck!👍

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Thomas S.'s Comment
member avatar

G-Town & Wiggle, Thanks for the quick response. You both sorta answered my question, but not quite: I’ll be more clear.

Once my licensing issue is resolved, I don’t plan to return to that particular company, but another company (with what seems to be better/more training, training pay, & closer to home).

So do I list company A on the application to company B?

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Yes, list it with an explanation of why you left.

Thomas, let me just mention a few things.

Close to home really should not be part of your decision - I've never had my trucking company's headquarters or terminal anywhere close to me. It's usually three or four states away and about 1,000 miles away. The only geographical criteria you should concern yourself with is the company's stated hiring area. That is what determines their ability to get you home for home time.

What makes you think you can determine that one company's training is going to be better than another's?

I would sure like to know what it is that influenced you to not return to that original company after rectifying the situation with your documents. If it has anything to do with things you heard from other new hires like yourself while at the orientation, then I think you're making a huge mistake. If what you told us was the only issue you had, then that company should be more than willing to bring you back on board. If there's more to the story, we need to know what it is if we are really going to be able to help.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Thomas S.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes, list it with an explanation of why you left.

Thomas, let me just mention a few things.

Close to home really should not be part of your decision - I've never had my trucking company's headquarters or terminal anywhere close to me. It's usually three or four states away and about 1,000 miles away. The only geographical criteria you should concern yourself with is the company's stated hiring area. That is what determines their ability to get you home for home time.

What makes you think you can determine that one company's training is going to be better than another's?

I would sure like to know what it is that influenced you to not return to that original company after rectifying the situation with your documents. If it has anything to do with things you heard from other new hires like yourself while at the orientation, then I think you're making a huge mistake. If what you told us was the only issue you had, then that company should be more than willing to bring you back on board. If there's more to the story, we need to know what it is if we are really going to be able to help.

Old School, several things influenced my decision. The “closer to home” criteria is indeed about home time. The two companies I’m applying to have terminals (and offer orientation) less than a 2 hour drive of where I live. I see their trucks on the highways I travel, regularly. One hauls regionally and promises home every weekend. Being 90 minutes away, that sounds like a promise they could keep. Company A’s home terminal is 8 hours away. I’ve never seen one of their truck on the road.

I want to do flatbed. Company A offered 3 days orientation, 2 days securement training, then 2-4 weeks with a trainer. Company B offers 1 week orientation, 1 week securement training, then 6 weeks with a trainer. Company C offers a similar 8 weeks of training. Is the training “better”? I can’t say, but I’d prefer more training rather than less training. Plus, B & C offer better training pay, which, unfortunately, I do have to consider.

I did a lot of research prior to going in. Company A was the lowest rated on Glassdoor and Indeed.com, with significantly more negative reviews than positive, but I did find a few glowing reviews on YouTube. This was also the case when I went to truck stops and talked to drivers. I heard everything from “Who?” to “Don’t waste your time.” I heard from drivers who claimed to have been there but left for whatever reason, but I never encountered an actual driver from Company A. Lastly, while in their orientation, I encountered quite a few recruits who were, (IMO) likely to contribute to the negative image of truck drivers. Will another company be different? I don’t know. But I know I didn’t want to be lumped in with that group.

So why did I go with A instead of B or C? Because of the few positive reviews I saw, and they were the first to respond when I had additional questions. Somehow Company B wasn’t even on my radar, and Company C was about G or H on my list at that time.

As Paul Harvey used to say: “And now you know the rest of the story.”

And Yes, the recruiter from Company A has called, and said to contact her if I change my mind about returning.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

So your main reasons for choosing this company is:

1) They have a terminal close to you

2) They had good reviews on Glassdoor

3) Their recruiter was the first to respond when you had questions

4) Their training pay is better

If I was going to write an article called "Four Completely Arbitrary Reasons For Choosing A Company" those would be four on my list.

If you would like to know how to choose a company properly you will find tons of information here:

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Thomas, I'm hoping that just maybe the fact we had an idea why you aren't going back speaks volumes to you about the fact that we know what you're up against.

Your impression of the company's recruits means nothing. There are worthless wannabes at any trucking company orientation. It has no meaning or effect on your career. Nor is it any kind of reflection of the quality of the company. By the same reasoning the reviews you find on trucking companies are worthless due to the fact they are written by those same worthless wannabes that didn't impress you in person. If you thought ill of them in person, why would you give their negative reviews any credence or allow their complete misunderstanding of this career influence your decision?

I know you're concerned about training pay, and I understand that. If you were to make a pie chart of a successful trucking career, that slice representing the training time would be smaller than miniscule. It really is a very tiny slice of time. Think big picture. Think long term. Once you get into your career, none of those things you mentioned in your search for a place to start are even relevant to your success as a driver.

Your thoughts about hometime are not accurate either. Proximity to a terminal has nothing to do with it. Freight lanes are what determines how you get home. Flat bed companies haul regionalized freight which keeps you in a region near your home. That is how some of them get their drivers home each weekend.

We think you're focusing on all the wrong things. And that can be a real problem once you get yourself embedded into your career. Here's a few articles on our site that hopefully can help you understand some of this. Take a look at them sometime.

Four Traps New Drivers Fall For

Tough Obstacles New Drivers Face

How To Be A Top Tier Driver

Thomas, I'm a very successful flat bed driver. I can work just about anywhere I choose. I've made a great career for myself at Knight Transportation, a company that most don't even realize has a flat bed division, and the company who is now famous for merging with Swift. If you pay attention to online reviews you'd think it insane to purchase Swift as a part of your strategy for success. All that critical stuff in reviews is really worthless. You have no idea of the caliber of person writing that stuff, and as you've determined yourself, there are some real doozies out here trying to get into trucking.

One last thought for you to consider: I started my flat bed driving career at Western Express. I have no doubt you've seen some reviews on that company. If not, do a brief search. The reviews are so bad they are frightening. I built a great foundation for my trucking career there - I loved every minute working there - they treated me like a king!

Success at trucking honestly depends on the traits and qualities you show under stress. It has nothing to do with the name of the company emblazoned on the doors of your truck.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Thomas I want to add to what Old School wrote,...

I am 5+ year driver with Swift and like Old School have a highly successful driving career as a Dedicated Walmart driver. Did you know Swift delivers to Walmart stores and Sam's Club? I have no reason to look elsewhere, quite happy with Swift and will likely retire there. Surprised? Indeed and GlassDoir never asked for my opinion and frankly I have no time for that. I'd rather focus a fraction of my freetime on here, helping folks like you find the best path to success.

There is very little credibility to most of the trucking company review information found on the internet...reader beware!

Here is the crux of the matter:

Web of Lies and Misinformation

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Thomas, to back up what Old School is saying about freight lanes and hometime i wanted to add something you might not have thought of.

we swap freight and trailers all the time with other drivers. So if you lived in the middle of Kansas and there were no customers there, the company would gibe you a load that had to go through Kansas and have you drive the freight close to home then another driver would pick it up. basically you would be routed through home.

i live in NJ, im dispatched out of our MO terminal. we take our trucks home and i am never late for hometime.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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