Mclane?

Topic 22460 | Page 2

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Rob T.'s Comment
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Good luck gladhand, sounds like an awesome gig

G-Town's Comment
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Good luck with this GH .

Army 's Comment
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Yeah, sounds like a pretty nice gig. Hope your day goes well today.

Gladhand's Comment
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All that is left now is driving test, drug test, finishing my app for gaps in employment, and finally get flown out to Aurora for orientation. If all goes well, I will be in a mclane truck by July.

Now i need to see if I can get into a manual truck to practice again. A little nervous due to me not having any manual experience. Havent drove one since i got my cdl.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Daniel B.'s Comment
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Sorry, not that anyone asked but I don't think that's a good opportunity.

That overnight shift is brutal and you'll have extremely low miles every week multiplied by only .46cpm means you're not going to be making any money. You'll probably have to remain on the night shift on your days off unless you're good at flip-flopping.

.46cpm is really, really low for a shuttle run. If I were you I would wait a little longer and get more experience and try to get another opportunity.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Got a phone interview tomorrow.

From what the recruiter told me I would be driving up to Raton,NM trading trailers and then come back to Albuquerque. 450 miles round trip with pay of .46 a mile. Usually working 4 days with Friday, Saturday, and Sunday off or Monday, Tuesday, Friday off. Beginning at 1700 and ending around 0700.

Dependent on how busy it is we may do 5 days on. Regardless two days off instead of just a 34 sounds great.

Let them know of my preventables and according to the manager interviewing me tomorrow, it shouldnt be a problem. Hope it works out and that I get on with them.

450 miles X .46cpm = $207

450 miles X 4 days = 1800 miles weekly

1800 miles X .46cpm = $828 GROSS weekly

You said shift is 1700 to 0700 which means 14 hour days.

Since this is a local job let's break it down to hourly pay which we never should do on an OTR job. $207 X 14 = $14.78 per hour

It's difficult to turn down a job but this is one I wouldn't even consider especially considering you'll be working 14 hour shifts overnight.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Sorry, not that anyone asked but I don't think that's a good opportunity.

That overnight shift is brutal and you'll have extremely low miles every week multiplied by only .46cpm means you're not going to be making any money. You'll probably have to remain on the night shift on your days off unless you're good at flip-flopping.

.46cpm is really, really low for a shuttle run. If I were you I would wait a little longer and get more experience and try to get another opportunity.

double-quotes-start.png

Got a phone interview tomorrow.

From what the recruiter told me I would be driving up to Raton,NM trading trailers and then come back to Albuquerque. 450 miles round trip with pay of .46 a mile. Usually working 4 days with Friday, Saturday, and Sunday off or Monday, Tuesday, Friday off. Beginning at 1700 and ending around 0700.

Dependent on how busy it is we may do 5 days on. Regardless two days off instead of just a 34 sounds great.

Let them know of my preventables and according to the manager interviewing me tomorrow, it shouldnt be a problem. Hope it works out and that I get on with them.

double-quotes-end.png

450 miles X .46cpm = $207

450 miles X 4 days = 1800 miles weekly

1800 miles X .46cpm = $828 GROSS weekly

You said shift is 1700 to 0700 which means 14 hour days.

Since this is a local job let's break it down to hourly pay which we never should do on an OTR job. $207 X 14 = $14.78 per hour

It's difficult to turn down a job but this is one I wouldn't even consider especially considering you'll be working 14 hour shifts overnight.

Made a typo with the times working. Didnt realize it until now, that would be a crazy long shift for miles that short, messed up the math on my part. If anything it will be a shorter shift, no longer than 10 hrs unless something goes wrong on either side. Probably finishing even earlier because its cpm I wont have to take my sweet time.

If you only knew the hours I work now haha, I do walmart. Its the whole reason I am willing to take a pay cut.

Been working nights for the last 3 months and prefer them, problem with this account i am on, there is no consistent schedule. So i flip flop around a lot. I dont mind the nights as long as it is a consistent schedule.

The flip flopping is taking a toll on me. I just slept all night and gurantee ill have to force myself to sleep all day today because theyll keep me on nights. Thing is they may need me this morning so i couldnt take the gamble and not delay my sleep either. Thanks for your input though, I dont need that much money to survive over here and the more off time is worth it.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

Gladhand

I understand you wanting to leave Walmart. I guess you can get your foot in the door and once you get some experience under your belt, you can start to look elsewhere. I am sure you will make the decision you feel is best, and even if that is a slight pay cut. Sometimes happiness out weight's a little higher pay.

Chris

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Not to stick my nose where it doesn't belong but have you tried a Old Dominion if one is near you? They had me do shuttles last week and it pays the minimum $25 per hour not every location has shuttles however. I run Extra board Linehaul at .57 CPM and I start every night at 9:30 PM it definitely helps me keep a regular sleep schedule.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Not to stick my nose where it doesn't belong but have you tried a Old Dominion if one is near you? They had me do shuttles last week and it pays the minimum $25 per hour not every location has shuttles however. I run Extra board Linehaul at .57 CPM and I start every night at 9:30 PM it definitely helps me keep a regular sleep schedule.

No, you have a right to put in something, i posted this publicly and have no issue with you guys giving advice or mentioning something. On another note I hope to get on with an LTL , old dominion is like 5 miles from my house it is across the street from the swift yard, but with how things are for me right now, Mclane will be a good fit. Its a run on my favorite interstate and I will be the 5th driver to work at this domicile, we don't even have a yard yet, that's how new this is. So the other opportunities may come around as well. Also forgot to mention that 4 days of work is the common thing, but due to lack of drivers I would probably be doing 5 runs instead. I understand it's a pay cut, but I can afford it.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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