SWIFT Drop And Hook?

Topic 22765 | Page 1

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Philip N.'s Comment
member avatar

I am going to the SWIFT Academy in July. My recruiter is telling me that the loads are 99.9% drop and hook. Is he telling me the truth? I friend who drove for them says that bull.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Not gonna happen...

Unless you are on a shuttle assignment, or a Dedicated Account, virtually impossible to predict a percentage of drop and hook vs. live load/unload. 99.9% is totally unrealistic for any TL OTR job.

The correct answer is it depends on the freight in their system, where it is and your availability if in general proximity of it. It will vary greatly from week to week, month to month, etc,

Don't expect anything much better than 50% to 60% drop and hook. And frankly not something I'd be concerned with at this stage of your journey.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Bolt's Comment
member avatar

I am going to the SWIFT Academy in July. My recruiter is telling me that the loads are 99.9% drop and hook. Is he telling me the truth? I friend who drove for them says that bull.

Which academy are you going to? I will be in Memphis in July.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Philip N.'s Comment
member avatar

Got the recruiter to put out in writing:

OTR is no driver unload. Local and regional dedicates routes have some driver unload.

Sources are telling me 99.9% drop and hook is not going to happen. One person says 50-60 percent. This is very important to me because I cannot load and unload a trailer.

Phil

Not gonna happen...

Unless you are on a shuttle assignment, or a Dedicated Account, virtually impossible to predict a percentage of drop and hook vs. live load/unload. 99.9% is totally unrealistic for any TL OTR job.

The correct answer is it depends on the freight in their system, where it is and your availability if in general proximity of it. It will vary greatly from week to week, month to month, etc,

Don't expect anything much better than 50% to 60% drop and hook. And frankly not something I'd be concerned with at this stage of your journey.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Just to be clear,a live unload or load doesn't usually require the Swift driver to physically unload or load the trailer. What you asked is different.

99% of the time you won't be touching any freight, that's not the same as drop and hook.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Chris M's Comment
member avatar

Yeah I'm thinking there may be some confusion. "Drop and hook" is different from "No touch freight" which I think was probably where the 99.9% figure came from.

Drop and hook means you get to a customer, (shipper or receiver, doesn't matter) you drop the trailer you have in their yard, grab another trailer and leave. That will work out to higher than 50% I would say, but definitely not 99%. There will be some weeks where you may do 4 drop and hooks with no live loads/unloads, and the next week may be the complete opposite. But you won't be having to unload anything by hand.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Big T's Comment
member avatar

I am crossing my year mark of being solo. I have touched freight one time and that was not required. DM said it was ok and it was only three pallets at a customer. All I did was pull them off the truck and set it on the dock.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I think you've gotten the clarified message. Swift will get you lots of drop/ hook, with a bunch of live load/ unload. But the chances of having to move boxes are slim to none.

Most of Swift freight is labeled shipper load and count, meaning that the trailer is sealed when you get it and you aren't responsible for those two things.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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