CR ENGLAND 16cpm

Topic 23040 | Page 2

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Simon D. (Grandpa)'s Comment
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Each driver is doing 3000/week, 6000 total? That's half of $960 or $480.

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That's $960/2 or $480 a week for 70 hours of driving a week. That's $6.85 an hour.

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Phillip, can you live on $960 dollars per week?

If you and your co-driver are getting it done like you should, that's what your gross pay would be. If a team runs 6,000 miles a week at that rate, each driver makes $960 dollars.

Now the question becomes, "Can I get out there and be that productive?" You're asking all the wrong questions.

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You may need to check your math......

6000 miles x 0.16c per mile = $960.00 not $480.00.

Just sayin' .....

😜lol

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No.... The truck gets paid 32c per mile (Your figures from your original post)....

6000 miles @ .32 = $1920.

$1920 divided by 2 = $960 per driver.

And don't forget the added pay for stops, layover, detention, etc., etc.

Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

I'm kind of thinking you have the wrong attitude here. Sure we all want to make a lot of money. But what's going to happen those first few months when so many things go wrong. You didn't understand the instructions that either your dispatcher , the security guard, or the shipping clerk gave you. It's your first time in a strange facility and you screw everything up. You can't get backed up correctly, you put it in the dock unhook your trailer and you didn't understand the instructions you were supposed to open the doors because at this facility they don't open them from the inside? Trust me you don't think about your cpm , or you're sitting for hours waiting to get loaded or unloaded not making a dime. You might get detention pay or breakdown pay but that isn't s***. The way you make money is to turn miles. You might want to think about doing this as a career. It really isn't exactly what many think it will be that's why there's such a high turnover.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

You can be ****ed off all you want. You gave up. and you arent calculating the team pay correctly and came here to moan instead of possibly thinking you were wrong.

EACH driver gets paid for 6000 miles, not 3000 miles.

So .32 x 6000 miles = $1920 then divide by 2 drivers = $960 each

OR

.16 x 6000 miles = $960 each driver

so can you live on $1000 per week?

Philip N.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you for all your feed back. I totally agree the bad attitude has got to go. I was so excited and positive at Trainco. I'd struggle but keep on trying. I think I was afraid I would fail the test and end up paying for the school. There was almost no chance that, on the very last day in the last few hours that I was going to get parallel parking and alley docking down well enough to pass. I hadn't even learned alley docking at the point. Prime is not .12cpm or $700.

Is that training pay??? Primes in team training is 14cpm or $700 whichever is greater.

and to answer your question... many people in the south can live on that, or certain areas of the country. they have a national fleet who does. especially if you live on the truck. Many CRE drivers are second chancers with background issues who were given a chance other companies wouldn't offer. They appreciate the investment, despite the fact that they are an insurance high risk.

However, i seriously think you need to do some deep thinking. Get rid of all the negativity. the " i cant drive a manual, i need an automatic, i cant back.. i had to leave the one school and now im going to bash a company that others enjoy after one email" crappy attitude.

if a company is not for you, then move on to researching another. But please, the bad attitude has to go.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

Back to the original question... rofl-3.gif

PlanB's Comment
member avatar

Are you seriously telling Rainy, a trainer at Prime, that she is wrong about what the students on her truck get paid?

rofl-3.gif

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Phillip, the fear is understandable and normal. so normal i wrote an article about it. you are not the first one who couldnt back or had clutch issues. No one can back. Splitter came on my truck with knee problems too. And for a week told me about how hard having 60 pounds of torque pushing back on you is. Yeah, 3 years i been doing it so i know. But sometimes people put too much pressure on themselves to be perfect. Is that the problem? they do not expect perfection on the test.

Did they explain the backing point system to you? Heck, you can hit like 4 or 5 cones and pass at 2 pts per cone and a couple extra pull ups. Dont be afraid to use those points.

Failed the CDL Exam? Dont Sweat It

One of the biggest parts of trucking is to get past the fears and negativity and get things done. I was terrified too. Failed the backing once and the road test twice. My determination to get help and to calm myself to figure it out pushed me through. Now that is a distant memory. But once solo, things go terribly wrong out here. You cant just walk away and choose another customer or another company cause you cant back into a door or truck stop spot.

You said the Schneider truck was sweet, so.what happened? There was no way to ask for additional time or ask another instructor to explain? Did they really only let you test once with no extra practice? is there no way to go back and complete the program?

There are plenty of great companies out there who will train you, The problem is that if you bounce from school to school, companies see you as a quitter plus it takes you so much longer to get solo. An example, Splitter came to Prime March 5thish. He got on my truck March 30th for team training and upgraded to solo May 28th. Another forum member went to Prime orientation at the same time, lied about a drug test and got sent home. Then that driver went to not one but TWO other companies and just finally upgraded to solo this week. She lost 2 whole months of solo pay plus ruined her reputation for future employers. Companies look back at your CDL employment for 10 years, so going from company to company can impact your future in a negative way.

As for Prime it is FOURTEEN cpm or $700 gross per week whichever is greater plus fuel bonuses, they might even get detention now too, im not sure about that. so it is quite possible to make over $1000 per week in team training depending on how hard you can run and if the truck needs repairs or the trainer takes home time.

.14 cpm x 5000 miles = $700

.14 x 6000 miles = $840

Honestly, i dont like to run trainees that hard because it is already exhausting and stressful. plus I like living, tired trainees equal death, so i slow us down after a bad couple days i might take a couple days off in the terminal. So on my truck, $700 plus bonuses is more normal than Turtles trainer who ran them harder,, so turtle made more.

But again.. back to the CRE thing. Do you now understand how the team pay works? And truthfully, CRE is one of the lower paying companies. So you will find higher pay elsewhere. There are reasons for that though. CRE will accept higher risk drivers others wont. Those with background issues, includng those who bounce from company to company. They are seen as a second chance employer. many appreciate their offer of a second chance. For that reason, i took it offensive the way you started the thread. especially since your understanding of team pay was incorrect.

and Yes, im being hard on you. That is what trainers do. We are tough so when you go it alone you can get through it. Splitter stopped talking to me the last day. Once solo he posted on here finally understanding that im tough for a reason. and we still talk almost every day.

check out his thread

Descending in an Automatic

good luck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

However, if you come to Prime with a CDL , you get $600 gross for the first 6 weeks then $700. Plus bonuses and tuition reimbursement.

You also need to team train for 40k miles if you come in with a CDL rather than the 30k miles if you do their PSD CDL program.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
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