Working For Maverick

Topic 23112 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Kevin L.'s Comment
member avatar

First the good news six months ago today I was offered a job at Maverick Transportation. I survived.

It has been a few weeks since I posted on here. To be honest I was not sure If I should even remain a member of this site. I believe in being honest and stating things clearly. I realize I’m not even close to having the level of experience many on here have. I understand that the mega carriers are good at business. I know that I’m still learning a lot of basic things other drivers may take for granted.

HOWEVER, I have noticed on this forum that there are only a very small handful of drivers that work ofor Maverick.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

First, congratulations on your 6 months at Maverick.

I guess I don't understand the point of your post. Are you upset that Maverick may be under-represented here? I know of several forum members who drive for them. Perhaps there are many others who are just like you, only posting every few weeks, or not at all.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I believe in being honest and stating things clearly. I realize I’m not even close to having the level of experience many on here have.

I like to be honest and state things clearly myself. So... here it is...

This whole website is devoted to helping brand new drivers like you!

There's really only a small core group of "experienced" drivers here. They are here to help you Kevin. So, quit keeping yourself in the dark. We are here to help!

Kevin L.'s Comment
member avatar

I was not done with the post but I will continue here. There seems to be very few people on this forum from Maverick. Of the ones I know of they all have multiple years experience in trucking and likely from other companies as well.

When a new person came on here asking about what to expect when they got to North Little Rock and how they could excel in training there I honestly thought that the best person to reply would be by someone who recently lived the experience. Not someone who may have a decade or two experience with other companies that may have entirely different ideas of how to train a person to drive.

I really do not want to press any issues about earnings potential between types of trucking. I can and did express my personal experience and felt like I was called incompetent because I pointed out that I make substantially more since I switched divisions and several people load and unload my truck while We both get paid to get it unloaded me to back up and open doors them to load and secure. It leaves me all that time to drive instead of burning up my clock

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Kevin, you know what your problem is? You have these ideas in your head about how things should work and how things should be done in this industry. When your ideas don't match up with your reality or you're not doing as well as you expected you think the problem is something outside of yourself.

You think you have the wrong teachers.

You think we're not the right mentors.

You think you're hauling the wrong type of freight

You may be thinking you're not working for the right company

What you need to do is realize you're brand new and there are a lot of things you just don't get yet. That's how it goes when you're new to anything that's difficult and complex. It takes time to figure things out. You've only been out there a matter of months. It's going to be quite a while yet before you get up to speed and more things start to make sense.

When you said you could make more money running refrigerated than flatbed we told you that you were simply not keeping things moving quickly enough with flatbed and gave you a ton of examples of people who were getting way more miles and making way more money their rookie year than you were. That should have clued you in to the fact that you simply have to keep learning and keep improving your performance.

This statement says a lot about your thinking:

When a new person came on here asking about what to expect when they got to North Little Rock and how they could excel in training there I honestly thought that the best person to reply would be by someone who recently lived the experience. Not someone who may have a decade or two experience with other companies that may have entirely different ideas of how to train a person to drive.

So you figure that since the experienced drivers didn't tell you what you wanted to hear that maybe we're the wrong guys to teach you, and maybe a student would be a better mentor for you?

Come on, man! Seriously?

Face the facts. You simply have to learn to become more proficient at this. It takes time.

Why aren't you asking us specific questions or giving us any information to go on?

What areas are you struggling with most?

How many miles are you turning each week?

What parts of your job or lifestyle aren't making sense or aren't living up to your expectations?

You come here to complain that you're in the wrong division or you have the wrong company or you have the wrong mentors, and at the same time you're not asking us any specific questions about how you can get better. That tells me you're not taking the right approach to learning. Focus on where you're struggling, ask questions, learn from others, and get better. That's the process. You have to be focused on making yourself better, not making changes to everything around you as if the problem is outside of yourself.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

I know the thread he’s talking about, and it’s probably me he has a problem with, I tend to rub people the wrong way.

Sorry Kevin, I only wanted to point out that I had just a couple more months than you in the same division for the same company with the same starting experience level, and I couldn’t be happier. Not sure why our two experiences have been so different.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Andhe78, there's no need for an apology. You are exactly who Kevin wanted to hear from. Here's what he said...

When a new person came on here asking about what to expect when they got to North Little Rock and how they could excel in training there I honestly thought that the best person to reply would be by someone who recently lived the experience.

This business is clearly and completely misunderstood by the majority of the rookies who try to make a go of it. Kevin's ideas of considering the best help to be that which comes from others who are just as green as himself is a great example of not understanding the dynamics of breaking into this career.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

So anyway, Kevin, you went tcd a while ago and I know you were happy the first couple weeks. Things still going good? What kind of miles are you averaging? Still making more than you did with flatbed? Just asking since it seems every tcd guy I talk to isn’t getting the miles. Hope you are doing better.

Kevin L.'s Comment
member avatar

Yes thank you for asking. I still love being in this division. I drive whatever is left on my 70. I have gotten only one reset since I started. I’m not seeing any shortage of miles. I am still averaging over 300 take home pay more than when when I was in USA flatbed.

However, they just gave a raise to flatbed and had I stayed it may have made a difference. Either way I’m regularly clearing more than the gauranteed gross weekly pay.

My high mileage day here in tcd is 759.6 not bad for one day from a rookie. We all have good days but I didn’t think that many miles in a day but now my goal is to break 800

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

It really makes no difference how many miles you get in a day. How many are you getting in a week, and how many in a month? If you're bumping up against your 70 then you should be cranking out 3,200+ miles per week and around 12,000 miles per month.

The concern is whether or not you're maximizing your logbook time. We've seen a lot of new drivers say they're maxing out their 70 but only turning 2,400 miles per week. Something is very wrong with the way you're recording your time if that's what is happening.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More