Manual??

Topic 23134 | Page 1

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Josh N.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi,

So I've been thinking about getting into the industry to use my GIBill. Anyway the school I want to go to teaches on manual trucks. I actually want to drive a manual truck. The thing I'm finding out is all the mega carriers that hire recent cdl students, majority of them are auto trucks. I just dont know if going to an auto truck will hurt me or not. I'm just worried if I go to one of these companies and only have autos it's going to hurt me in the long run with little or zero manual experience. Am I just over thinking this?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bill F.'s Comment
member avatar

If you train and get your CDL on manual transmissions. Then, go to a company that uses automatics. They will train you to use the automatic effectively. If you then go to a company that uses manuals, and all your experience is on auto's, they will train you to use the manual. Yes, you are overthinking this. You will be provided the training you need to get the job done. If they don't want to provide this training, I would not work for them.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Hello Josh, and welcome aboard!

Look, the auto-shift trucks are here to stay. To be honest with you, I love mine. They are both efficient and effective. I've done all the famous Mountain descents in mine with zero problems.

You may enjoy reading this article about Real Truck Drivers And Automatic Transmissions.

I'd say you're overthinking it. There's always going to be some sticklers who don't want to see things change, but the technology is here, and these transmissions are performing very well. There's considerable misunderstanding about them. They are not anything like automatic transmissions in automobiles. They are still the same basic gear box as a big truck manual transmission. The difference is that they shift themselves. Most of them still allow you to put it into a manual mode so that you are in charge of the shifting.

Robsteeler's Comment
member avatar

Josh, don’t worry about it. The automated manual transmission is pretty amazing. Between manual mode, creep mode for slow maneuvers, hill assist, and the terrain mapping cruise mode, it’s got great technology. You just need to get used to it and you’ll love it. Go ahead and take your test on a manual truck just to leave yourself options, but all the big carriers are going auto.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

Josh

Being in the military, I would encourage you to save your gi bill and go thru company sponsored training.

Paid CDL Training Programs

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Josh N.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks everyone. I guess I a. Over thinking stuff. I was just worried that smaller companies, or local companies would still be running manuals where as the big fleets would be autos, but after more research it sounds like everything will be auto in a few years.. thanks everyone everyone for the replies.

Josh N.'s Comment
member avatar

Why do you say that?

Josh

Being in the military, I would encourage you to save your gi bill and go thru company sponsored training.

Paid CDL Training Programs

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

I say that because you can go to a school sponsored training, mostly free and still have the ability to use ur gi bill later if you want to go back and pick up trade or whatanot....esp now with gi bill for life, it shouldn't expire in 10 years... assuming that will be retroactive.

And, to be honest, I have heard almost no complaints about company sponsored training on here. For a few companies they only require a 10 month commitment after. Need a solid job anyway.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Josh N.'s Comment
member avatar

Fair enough. I dont ever see myself going back to school. In 37 now, 100% service connected. I dont want to sign a contract with a company either. Dont mind using my benefits to pay tot school especially with tuition reimbursement most companies offer. And with the apprenticeship program, voc rehab and Pell Grant's you can make decent money. As far as I know I wont use all my benefits if I do the 2 year apprenticeship, then the yellow ribbon program can kick in and pay for school if I ever decide to go back to school after 2 years on the apprenticeship program. At least that's the way my DAV rep explained it all to me. I plan on retiring at 40 anyway. Driving is just a way to add some decent money to the bank account while using the benefits. I have no debt at the money and like I said 100% service connected. If I cant love off that and the money i have saved in the bank and put into my 401k I'm doing something wrong.

Army 's Comment
member avatar

Ok, sounds like a solid plan.. we look forward to following you with the journey.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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