Hello, Y'all~! 5'year Lurker..finally Saying HIYA W/ A Conundrum.

Topic 23407 | Page 1

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Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
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Hiya peeps; never thought I'd take this quantum leap since Brett reset my PW or somehow fixed me up here, a year ago, haha! I've spoken to a few of you on this forum via other means; been 'lurking' for at least 5 years.

Here's my story. Husband had to 'recertify' or something in 2003; Roadmasters.... yup~ even though he'd had his CDL , he never took the buck sixty class... (old renegade, I guess....) Well, he trained me.... and I tested out, ...... in his Boss'man's PeterCar ... in 2012.... (we were pulling tanks for his boss for years....actually bought one of the older gals, just for a project for the kids.. no authority, no O/O's here.. nope.)

He drove for USX, Transport America, FedEx/LineHaul (<

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
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WELL Brett.. idk what happened to the rest of the post, because I sure previewed it...twice~! haha~! Was at 2800 characters.... idk.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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WELL Brett.. idk what happened to the rest of the post, because I sure previewed it...twice~! haha~! Was at 2800 characters.... idk.

It might have had something to do with the different characters you used. I don't think the filter liked some of that stuff and thought you were trying to pull some funny stuff and erased it.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Big Scott's Comment
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So, what is your question?

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

WELL Brett.. idk what happened to the rest of the post, because I sure previewed it...twice~! haha~! Was at 2800 characters.... idk.

double-quotes-end.png

It might have had something to do with the different characters you used. I don't think the filter liked some of that stuff and thought you were trying to pull some funny stuff and erased it.

Ahhh that explains it (sorta, LoL..) I do tend to use 'characters' when I type. I'll try to be more careful.

Big Scott, my question is this: I've had my CDL for awhile driving with my husband, but never on my own. Got it the non traditional route, via him and his boss's equipment, never took that buck'sixty class. Hubby took his in '03, but had actually been driving dumps and such, prior. He put in his six or so years OTR with the companies I listed, then went to hauling asphalt for this guy that got me into driving w/ the hubby.

He is now hauling Intrastate (home daily, off weekends) for a company that pulls boxes in boxes. Sure, I could ride along with him, but cannot drive, as they don't consider my 'experience' as such.

Would I fare better to just go to the community college and take the class to get that coveted certificate? Or wait until my son gets his driver's license and go to an OTR training school? I'd rather not waste people's time; including my own.

I'm prepared to 'study' more as I'll probably need a refresher there; I remember most of the important rules, but in no way have memorized it all.

Just wondering your thoughts, guys.

Also, question for G Town : WMPF is running ads here in Ohio, looking for drivers with 30 months experience or more (hubby qualifies) which is 5 days on, two off... is that 5 days OTR, do you know?

Thanks guys, stay safe !!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Intrastate:

The act of purchasers and sellers transacting business while keeping all transactions in a single state, without crossing state lines to do so.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

You want to go to school at the point in which you are ready to get started with your driving job. A stale certificate is pretty much worthless. One good year of OTR driving will work wonders for your budding truck driving career.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

You want to go to school at the point in which you are ready to get started with your driving job. A stale certificate is pretty much worthless. One good year of OTR driving will work wonders for your budding truck driving career.

Thanks, O/S .... didn't think about the certificate getting stale. Good point. Probably going to have to go the long route, after all. Appreciate the reply.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Anne, my sister-in-law was in a similar situation - drove with her hubby for almost 17 years. (Illegally) learned how to drive a big rig, including all those backing maneuvers.

She decided to go legitimate and took the 160 hour course, financed through her husband's company. Aced the test after the four weeks of school.

An answer to the G-Town question: 5 on/2 off sounds like a regional assignment. But sometimes that "2 off" may be a way to describe a regular 34-hour break then back behind the wheel.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott's Comment
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Sounds like you have a child at home that needs caring for. If he is 16, then during the next 2 years is a great amount of time to study and prepare for school. That's my $0.02.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
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Anne, my sister-in-law was in a similar situation - drove with her hubby for almost 17 years. (Illegally) learned how to drive a big rig, including all those backing maneuvers.

She decided to go legitimate and took the 160 hour course, financed through her husband's company. Aced the test after the four weeks of school.

An answer to the G-Town question: 5 on/2 off sounds like a regional assignment. But sometimes that "2 off" may be a way to describe a regular 34-hour break then back behind the wheel.

Errol .. thanks so much for the reply; you are a much respected GURU on this site.. to say the least. My husband's new company does not take, nor finance, newbies. I actually got a pal in with 3 months OTR , hired on to hubby's place. They are looking THAT hard, but nope; not me. No experience in their 'office' minds.

Long story short, asphalt 6122 and 3257 doesn't move in the winter months. The gent that he drove for (gawsh we shall miss those Pete's) ended up opting to sell the fleet (of five) in the divorce. 359's and 357's. Tried to post a pic of the '84 we 'bought' for a project for the son. For safety sake, the tractors were great and REALLY well maintained; just older gals. Needed the muscle, he said. After three years of hubby pulling United Precast in the winter, we realized flatbedding is SO not for us. Almost ended up like Persian, one time. One time is too many. Story for another day, when I can figure out how to post pictures. Bad day in Cleveland, going to the subway (yes they have those..) the load hopped, I was B'seat, over a bridge, upcoming a school zone.... he pulled over and I ratcheted and chained that 'tripod' of some bridge beams, like my life depended upon it. It kinda did. TOTAL respect for O/S and all you flatbedders (can't remember all the names) out here. We didn't leave right; we almost didn't end right.

That's amazing that your sister in law's company did that. Maybe I wasn't totally legal; not sure. Super Solo turned teams, tbh. His new company, pulling boxes in boxes doesn't offer that as of yet, but then again, maybe if we put it out there; they'd rethink their non'thoughts.

Does SWIFT have a 'refresher' type of thing for an older gal like me? I can drive better in reverse than forward, haha..... just kidding.

Thanks AGAIN for your reply.

Anne

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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