So, What Are The Practical Advantages Of Flatbedding For All It's Hardships?

Topic 23581 | Page 2

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:
Mike D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hey Old School...have you always been flatbed? And just out of curiosity, how much on average percentage wise would you say that you break out the tarps? Thanks in advance.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I have thought about responding to this thread so many times, and then decided not to.

So have I, but I'm sure I would be booted right out. sorry.gif

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Hey Old School...have you always been flatbed? And just out of curiosity, how much on average percentage wise would you say that you break out the tarps?

Yes Mike, I started my trucking career as a flatbed driver. In my previous years of being in business, we hauled or products on our own flat bed trucks. Because of that, I already had some experience with load securement practices, which kind of helped a little.

Okay as far as tarping goes, I've been serving a dedicated flatbed account for SAPA (now called "Hydro") for a little more than four years. They are a major producer of aluminum extrusions. All of our loads have to be tarped, but we also have a good many of our flatbed trailers set up with a "Conestoga" cover. Here's what they look like from inside the cover.

0101867001538789287.jpg

Here's a couple examples of typical "tarped" loads of mine. Remember, on this account we are oftentimes running multi-stop loads, which means you have to learn some tricks to be able to peel the tarps back in certain sections of the load to unload, and then re-secure them and roll on to the next stop. You will burn up way too much time untarping and retarping if you don't develop the skills to hustle and get the most done in an efficient time frame.

0448210001538789697.jpg0381653001538789778.jpg

They make efforts at loading the multi-stop loads on the Conestoga trailers, but they don't always have the trailers they need on their yard at the proper time.

I actually enjoy tarping my loads. I am the oldest driver on this account, and the younger fellows, while not really understanding my motivation or enjoyment of this type work, all give me a great deal of respect. When they don't understand what to do, or hit a snag on a load, they come see the "old guy" for some good solid advice.

I still remember the day I got hired onto this gig, the manager pulled me aside, and expressed his concern about my age. He wanted me to be "extra" careful climbing on loads. He said he didn't want to see me get hurt. They long ago quit worrying about me. In fact last week that same manager called me to ask a few questions about the safety practices at one of the plants. He ended the conversation by explaining why he wanted my opinion on the subject. He told me, "You are the only driver we have who has never gotten hurt on this job, and yet you've been here longer than anyone else. I don't think you've even broken a nail."

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I actually enjoy tarping my loads. I am the oldest driver on this account, and the younger fellows, while not really understanding my motivation or enjoyment of this type work, all give me a great deal of respect. When they don't understand what to do, or hit a snag on a load, they come see the "old guy" for some good solid advice.

I still remember the day I got hired onto this gig, the manager pulled me aside, and expressed his concern about my age. He wanted me to be "extra" careful climbing on loads. He said he didn't want to see me get hurt. They long ago quit worrying about me. In fact last week that same manager called me to ask a few questions about the safety practices at one of the plants. He ended the conversation by explaining why he wanted my opinion on the subject. He told me, "You are the only driver we have who has never gotten hurt on this job, and yet you've been here longer than anyone else. I don't think you've even broken a nail."

Us old guys aren't dead yet, Old School. smile.gif

I hope to meet you one of these days, you are an inspiration.

Brian's Comment
member avatar

I'm convinced old school is just part Android or something haha. I can only hope to be able to be in that good of health and shape at that age. Indeed an inspiration.

millionmiler24 (CRST Amba's Comment
member avatar

I'm convinced old school is just part Android or something haha. I can only hope to be able to be in that good of health and shape at that age. Indeed an inspiration.

No Old School is an inspiration to ALL truck drivers no matter the division. He has quite possibly the best work ethic, the most motivation and the most raw tenacity to get this job done. If I was to ever go flatbed he would be my 1st choice for a trainer or mentor. Old School if we haven’t said it enough, thanks for your service on here and to this industry. You sir are an honest to God Living Legend and I would love to meet you someday and buy you lunch. 😀

thank-you.gifsmile.gifthank-you-2.gif

Joe Mc's Comment
member avatar

One thing not mentioned yet is the various opportunities which arise after getting your foot in the door and gaining experience in open deck work. Specialized and heavy haul divisions are much more intensive from a logistics standpoint, training and skill than other open deck operations and that's also where you will see significant advance in pay. The company I'm with has a specialized / heavy haul division. They hire primarily from within and the waiting list is roughly 8 months before consideration. There's additional training for the various styles of trailers along with familiarization with permit, escort, police escort, policies etc. Those trucks are all 4 axle rigs and company drivers average between 125-150k per year while rarely running over 1800 miles per week. Open deck offers the most options over other aspects in trucking and rewards the hard work in many ways, you just have to go get it. Oh and you'll drive really nice trucks, I know I love mine.

Excuse me, but if I may ask, what trucking company do you work for?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

Joe Mc, I drive for Kivi Brothers out of Duluth Minnesota.

Joe Mc's Comment
member avatar

Robert, thank you for your reply to my question. I didn’t know the pay could be that good in heavy haul, wow...Your reply to the OP really rekindled my interest in heavy/specialty hauling. My plans of starting off with an entry level flatbed job kind of went awry, (long story). I wound up at Knight Transportation driving for their dry van division as my first job, instead. With what you’ve revealed, I’m considering a move to a dedicated flatbed/heavy haul company after I complete my first year at Knight. Thanks again for the good info.

double-quotes-start.png

One thing not mentioned yet is the various opportunities which arise after getting your foot in the door and gaining experience in open deck work. Specialized and heavy haul divisions are much more intensive from a logistics standpoint, training and skill than other open deck operations and that's also where you will see significant advance in pay. The company I'm with has a specialized / heavy haul division. They hire primarily from within and the waiting list is roughly 8 months before consideration. There's additional training for the various styles of trailers along with familiarization with permit, escort, police escort, policies etc. Those trucks are all 4 axle rigs and company drivers average between 125-150k per year while rarely running over 1800 miles per week. Open deck offers the most options over other aspects in trucking and rewards the hard work in many ways, you just have to go get it. Oh and you'll drive really nice trucks, I know I love mine.

Excuse me, but if I may ask, what trucking company do you work for?

double-quotes-end.png

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Joe Mc, where are you located?

Are you aware of Knight's dedicated flat bed opportunities?

Page 2 of 3 Previous Page Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More