Waiting List For Maverick’s CDL Sponsorship

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Jason R. (Ruck)'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Han Solo! I have wanted to drive truck all my life, well since I was a kid. I could say I wish I had done it when I was younger but I would not trade that for my daughter for that. And I would not have her if I had not taken the path that I did. I have over 20 years in emergency services (fire and ems) and like you it isn’t that I don’t love what I do now, it’s just that I have seen enough, dealt with enough of other people’s tragedy and I am fortunate enough that I can lock in my retirement at the 20 year mark at my company. I also want to be able to give my family a better life financially.

I will try to keep a good joirnal of my experiance at school and then once I get out there on my own I will try to be one of those youtubing truckers. I will try to keep focused on providing educational content though. I have learned a lot from some of those videos (Dale Clay, Craig Ryan, CDL College) and I want to pay it forward.

Stay safe out there! Ruck

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jason R. (Ruck)'s Comment
member avatar

I will try to keep a good joirnal of my experiance at school and then once I get out there on my own I will try to be one of those youtubing truckers. I will try to keep focused on providing educational content though. I have learned a lot from some of those videos (Dale Clay, Craig Ryan, CDL College) and I want to pay it forward.

Stay safe out there! Ruck

Also, I wanted to make sure that this is known to anyone wanting to get there CDL..... This site, Trucking Truth has been such a great resource!!! And I HIGHLY recommend the “High Road CDL Training Program”, it has been wonderful! I have finished all of the sections I need for my CDL + endorsements and am going through it a second time! AWESOME TRAINING MATERIAL!!!!!! And the Pre-Trip guide is amazing as well!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brazen's Comment
member avatar

Another future Maverick student here. I finished the online app yesterday and will be calling the recruiter as directed tomorrow morning. Looks like I'll be waiting a couple months too. Wish I could start tomorrow. I'm looking to get into the reefer game, midwest otr or regional.

Enjoying the cdl training threads, keep it up and best of luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

I'm looking to get into the reefer game, midwest otr or regional.

You should have watched a few more YouTube videos-one of the company’s quirks is they never use the term “reefer” when talking about the refrigerated division. It’s always tcd (temperature controlled division.)

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm currently enrolled in Diesel Driving School in Sun Prairie, WI. Two weeks through the three week program and I'm extremely impressed with the school. My instructor (Jim) is the same age as me (66) and has been an instructor there for over 30 years! He really knows his stuff and how to teach it. Every time I have difficulty, Jim finds a way to explain it or demonstrate it so I can understand what to do and how to do it. At this point in the course, I appreciate that the school teaches what is essential to pass the CDL pre trip and driving exam, which will be next week. Teaching us to be "truck drivers" is secondary to the CDL test skills. Being a real "truck driver" will come after I get my CDL and hire on with a company and go through their training program and then go solo. When I've completed 1 year with the same company, then and only then I might consider myself a "truck driver". All of this I have learned right here on Trucking Truth. Good luck Jason. And before you accept a job, consult with as many unbiased people as possible. I've been able to do this because I'm going to an independent school without ties to any one company. All the company recruiting presentations are interesting, but we all need objective advice before make the big decision.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
before you accept a job, consult with as many unbiased people as possible. I've been able to do this because I'm going to an independent school without ties to any one company.

Just a word of caution on that advice. In the last six years I don't think I've found any unbiased truck drivers. Think about what you're saying. You are biased toward "independent" schools. You think you're getting objective advice due to the fact that they don't have "ties to any one company."

Both Brett and I attended private schools, yet we constantly tout the virtues of the Paid CDL Training Programs.

To be honest, selecting which trucking company to start your career with should not be the lengthy agonizing process most people go through. There is a limited number of companies who can hire inexperienced drivers. All of the major carriers are basically going to treat you like a professional as long as you conduct yourself as a professional. The reasons behind all the internet trash talk have nothing to do with the corporate culture of these companies, but rather the completely misunderstood nature of what it takes to break into this career. Failures abound and misplaced accusations start flying. Then the rest of us, who have no understanding of how all this works, let ourselves believe this foolishness.

When a rookie driver starts their trucking career they're not just starting a job. It's more like starting an interview. Everything they do, every attitude they demonstrate, each bit of effort they make, and each level of progress they manage - all of these things are being measured and evaluated. Unfortunately many of them fall short of what's being looked for in that year long interview. Most of those who fall short make this very wrong conclusion, which says all the difficulties they faced were due to their choice of company. They don't understand how much it takes to excel at this, nor do they get how important it is to establish themselves as independent standouts from the many mediocre players in the game.

Everyone of us faces basically the same difficulties during our rookie year, and they are all part of the steep learning curve that divides the successful professionals from the average drivers who never seem to excel at this career. Those difficulties come with the career, not the company. There is a process in place during that first year that will define your future trucking career. Trucking itself is biased. The movers and shakers are treated much better than the average drivers. Those who can figure out how to get more done are given more opportunities to prove themselves further.

The formula for success in trucking has nothing to do with who you work for, but rather how you work for them.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Of course it matters who you work for. Otherwise every new driver could pick a company out of a hat. I agree that the driver's ultimate success depends on their attitude, work ethic, professionalism and a fair amount of good luck. I also have learned in my 66 years of life that there is wisdom in a multude of counselors. At my school there is a man who directs the placement department and schedules various companies who make recruiting presentations. He has no ties to any one company. Every company recruiter touts their company as the greatest place to work in the entire industry. Who do you think will give better advice? I certainly will give serious consideration to my placement director and his wealth of knowledge and experience. My point was that new drivers like myself need to seek advice from a variety of sources. That is the only way to make an informed decision.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

What did you learn from Old School’s reply? Anything?

For the record I agree with him... and he and I collectively have a lot of trucking experience plus almost 60 years each of life experience.

Choosing a company based on how they road train, the corridors they run, the type of freight they have, home time, what areas they hire from, future opportunities beyond the first year and the equipment they run are what I focused on when I was in your position.

I had my mind made up before school opting for a Paid CDL Training Programs with Swift. I’ve been there for almost six years now...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Jason R. (Ruck)'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Bruce K. I have checked out Maverick pretty extensively. I am the type to be overly cautious. I have talked to drivers themselves because I feel that no one knows better than the enployees of how a company treats people. I have heard nothing but good things....well, for the most part. Every company has it’s flaws in someone’s eyes. Mostly it was the miles...but it was the division that they chose that caused the shortage of miles. My particular division is the higher mile (harder work/physically demanding) division. But I accept that and I have never had a position anywhere that wasn’t the most physical demanding for that field (Paramedic and Firefighter). I do appreciate you giving me advise and to tell you the truth, I am kinda getting discouraged. It has been 2 months and I still don’t have a spot in school yet. I KNEW THIS GOING IN and was never lied to about it being a waiting game. My discouragement comes from being totally mentally burnt out from 20 years of seeing other people’s worst day and a lot of times last day of their life. I can’t leave there until I am secured into having a spot at the other company. Didn’t mean to ramble on, just trying to keep myself inspired. Lol. I’m a goober like that. Be safe! Good luck! And feel free to comment, post, update us as much as you want!

Good luck Jason. And before you accept a job, consult with as many unbiased people as possible. I've been able to do this because I'm going to an independent school without ties to any one company. All the company recruiting presentations are interesting, but we all need objective advice before make the big decision.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jason R. (Ruck)'s Comment
member avatar

Old School, G Town, Thank you both. I was going to go to private achool. But I started thinking after I joined this site amd did some reading, if I spend money out of my own pocket to do that, I still am not guaranteed that I will get a job right out of school....Ok, so truck drivers are in high demand (according to the private school couselor...which is a recruiter in their own way), but I didn’t feel that was enough of a guarantee. Then I looked at all of those companies that Brett (and whomever else helped) put reviews of the paid training. That along with the following is how I made my decision.... 1. My schooling can be paid for with a small commitment to that company. 2. That small commitment may be one to two years....you all recommend staying at least one year with your first company anyway. 3. And this is probably the MOST important thing....I AM NOT LOOKING FOR A NEW JOB, I AM LOOKING FOR A NEW CAREER!! So I am not looking for someone to pay for my training just so I can company hop. I want someone who I feel will be the best fit for me.

**Disclaimer** I am not accusing anyone of doing the above stated. I am simply giving MY personal feelings and thoughts/rationale in making my decision.

I will let everyone know when I get a spot in the school. Maverick is in the process of starting theor own CDL Training program and I am excited for this!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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