Five Month Professional Driver Program??

Topic 23773 | Page 5

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Eggman's Comment
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Began Pretrip today. Not being mechanically inclined, it was head scratching reading it and doing it initially. I have always heard of the alternator- but never knew what it looked like until today.

Since it’s a short week- it looks like we will be doing this for three days.

I’ll keep ya posted.

-Eggman

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Not sure if I sent you this:

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Eggman's Comment
member avatar

Sorry I haven’t posted In a couple days. Tho not much to say , I had a few highlights of the tandem days.

Studied pre trip on equipment we won’t be tested on, and we will have to learn pretrip on another truck, of a separate brand and motor.

(We’re in the process of transitioning trucks -old to new-, a down fall of a 5 month program.)

Bright side? This way will allow me to recognize parts rather than patterns. (I am not mechanically Inclined. )

I got to drive a bobtail KW. Learning how to double clutch. Circled the yard with a team, restricted to 15mph (Tho the instructor’s 15 whas our 10. “Mission first, Saftey always!” He’d bellow).

I’ll tell ya. I’ve never learned how to drive a clutch. I literally Killed the engine first clutch attempt. I progressively got better through the rounds, and something kept nagging at me.

*Even tho I’ve studied it- that means nothing without application.

Continuing:

I finally got my permit! (Yay!)

I procrastinated on my HAZMAT Final and had to sit my practice time out to answer each question and provide the page number in the cdl handguide, even tho I passed the hazmat with a 92 for the permit. This basically reduced my practice time to 2 hours. (Moral of the story? Don’t procrastinate kids- or you’ll have to play catch-up.)

Over all- not a bad couple days. I’ve been reconsidering my rookie year company. Should I really do dry van/reefer my first year, or could I accomplish the necessary experience safely in a flat bed? Because specializing in a load helps narrow down prospect companies (Whicn they all typically carry dry van. A smaller selection helps prevent being overwhelmed by all the possible choices available to start my first year).

With that being said- next week starts Mode 2.

Happy Thanksgiving! -Eggman

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Double Clutch:

To engage and then disengage the clutch twice for every gear change.

When double clutching you will push in the clutch, take the gearshift out of gear, release the clutch, press the clutch in again, shift the gearshift into the next gear, then release the clutch.

This is done on standard transmissions which do not have synchronizers in them, like those found in almost all Class A trucks.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

*Even tho I’ve studied it- that means nothing without application.

This is exactly what we were saying in the beginning. After 5 mos of studying, you still won't learn it without the application. So once you go to a company, you will still have a year of learning ahead of you.

and your statement of "they all typically carry dry van" is incorrect. I can have dry loads by turning off my reefer , but my company does not have a dry van division.

IMO you are limiting yourself if you choose a company with only one division if you are not sure if you want flatbed or not. Its a better idea to pick a larger company with a few divisions so if you lose interest in flatbed or find it difficult, you can switch divisions within the company. There are so many benefits to this, including building your reputation and showing future employers you have a strong commitment. Also, your first company will be more forgiving when iy comes to accidents.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Eggman...I agree with “Young Rainy”. (slight smirk)

My work on the Walmart Account includes both reefer and dry; at times one each during a single shift.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Eggman...I agree with “Young Rainy”. (slight smirk)

My work on the Walmart Account includes both reefer and dry; at times one each during a single shift.

rofl-3.gifthank-you-2.gif

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I'd be ready to gouge my eyes out if I had to study for a written test for 4 weeks. That's insane.

Eggman's Comment
member avatar

Hola,

I’ve been in Mod2 for the past two weeks. The six hour days are split, three hours classroom and three hours application. We did bob tail straight backing for a week, then did straight backing with a trailer this entire week. Next week is driver side off set. The classroom portion has been a joke, to say the least. Lots of “down time” for one reason or another. We are not allowed to pretrip when we are out on the field because that time is “scheduled for maneuvers only” but they have been failing to let us pre trip during classroom time on a truck. Sure- we did in cab with a picture projected on the screen, some practice is better than none.

Fortunately, since I’m on the afternoon scheadule, I only have one other student training with me and we challenge each other on the pre trips every 30 mins. One time he challenged me to do the in cab backwards. Gotta have fun, right?

I also have some updates on my MVR , aparantly Washington State issued two people (myself and another bloke) the same ID number- and we have been sharing records for a few years now. They are “investigating” further and trying to take off the items that will prevent me from getting hired and some companies (Maverick already told me they wouldn’t even bring me to orientation till I fixed it). It’s been tedious as I’ve been trying to get this fixed for two months now. Thankfully, I still have a few months left of school to sort that jazz out so I’m not just sitting around with a CDL I can’t use.

All in all, it’s a slow, snail paced process. I take it for what it is, and enjoy my home time while I can. I enjoy being able to focus on maneuvers a bit longer.

I’m excited to start my career next spring.

Hope everyone is staying warm. -Eggman

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

MVR:

Motor Vehicle Record

An MVR is a report of your driving history, as reported from your state Department of Motor Vehicles. Information on this report may include Drivers License information, point history, violations, convictions, and license status on your driving record.

Jamie T's Comment
member avatar

The 6 month schooling sounds a bit long stretched for a license that typically takes 5 weeks of training and studying to receive. But I'm sure it has its benefits, and if the scheduling and class structure works for you keep at it. I'll keep reading your updates as I've never heard of a CDL school like this. I'm starting with Schneider myself next week they seem pretty promising as a starter company.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Eggman's Comment
member avatar

I'm starting with Schneider myself next week they seem pretty promising as a starter company.

Schneider is probably where I’m gonna start once I have my CDL- as I can transfer into the tanker division once I have some experience without switching companies.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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