Five Month Professional Driver Program??

Topic 23773 | Page 4

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Eggman's Comment
member avatar

After a long weeked - Tuesday came and gone. We studied doubles/triples as well as tanker from the cdl handbook. Watched a couple videos about roll overs and attaching a dolly. Today was slow- and all the teachers seemed a bit worried as some big wigs came in to evaluate the school to see if they should maintain their accreditation, which I suppose is something that happens every five years. Of my six logged “classroom” hours- maybe 3.5 was used for instruction. Another hour for self study on Trucking truth and cdl study budy. 1.5 hour of sitting around lolly gagging.

Sure is slow paced... It baffles me a bit that we don’t use every minute available, but I am not the professor. What’s even crazier- is there are students who try to leave early and skip class. I just want my monies worth of education.

Tomorrow I take the tanker and double/triple endorsements exams. Then we begin hazmat. I’m truly exited for the hazmat - as I’m fascinated by the idea of hauling hazardous materials.

Until tomorrow- -Eggman

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Baffle:

A partition or separator within a liquid tank, used to inhibit the flow of fluids within the tank. During acceleration, turning, and braking, a large liquid-filled tank may produce unexpected forces on the vehicle due to the inertia of liquids.

Doubles:

Refers to pulling two trailers at the same time, otherwise known as "pups" or "pup trailers" because they're only about 28 feet long. However there are some states that allow doubles that are each 48 feet in length.

Eggman's Comment
member avatar

Took and passed my tanker and double/triples with a 100 on each. Today class was let out early. Went in for about 1.5 hours to watch a video on YouTube about slack adjusters (how to replace). I suppose this was to give us a better understanding of how it works. The video was only 10 min. The rest of the time was self study.

Then I went home after passing the tests at the DOL.

Tomorrow is Hazmat.

See you then. -Eggman

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

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There you go. Your right- what do I know. :) Just wanted to share my experience- but it sounds like it’s not wanted here.

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Hey Eggman,

I'm new to the forum and I want to say I appreciate your comments. I'm just starting a three week CDL program but I understand that your decision was based on your individual circumstances and that was the right decision for you. Don't get discouraged by anyone and keep posting because I want to read your ongoing posts. Good luck with school. Remember, Never give up and Never give in and you may just be alright.

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Bruce did you read the entire thread to gain context and a full understanding of; “why” this became a lively discussion with 3 mods involved?

In the end I believe we arrived at a positive spot, an exchange of ideas and observations; with Eggman knowing that although it’s not the recommended approach, we totally support him in his journey.

G-Town: Yes, I read the whole thing, lid to lid. I understand both points of view. Just wanted to encourage Eggman to keep posting.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Eggman's Comment
member avatar

Hello everyone.

I wanted to give an update of the ending of last week. Thursday we studied Hazmat- then took the test on Friday. I passed with a 92. They gave me a piece of paper stating that I now need to pay 90 bucks for a TSA background check. I asked my school if this is an expense that they would pay (as I’m dropping almost 10k for the class) and come to find out- they don’t. Now gotta save some money for that.

Next week is a short week due to Turkey Day. Three days of pre-trip inspections. I’m Gonna make it a goal to try to have most of it memorized before thanks giving- and hopefully all of it memorized by the time I return to class the following Monday.

I believe I have made a decision on which company I wanna pursue once I have my CDL. I know it’s not recommended- but Schneider has (from what I’ve researched) one of the best tanker training out there for experienced and inexperienced drivers alike. Tanking is a serious interest of mine- and there is a specific job position I’m looking to snag in Washington State once I have at least 15 months of experience.

If anyone has any thoughts on Schneider- or maybe recommends on another company to train me on pulling a tank that could prove to be a better experience- I’m all ears. I do know that it’s recommended for new drivers to start with dry van. What can I say tho- I’m not following that recommendation if a company will allow me to start on a tank.

I want to also note: I finished Brett’s Book last night. It was a great read. I certainly have more concerns now than I did before. I also feel more at ease too. Nothing really surprised me when I was reading it, except maybe the cheating the log books part.

I definitely have some specific questions to ask Doug (my recruiter) and try to get some things in writing.

Anyways, I hope everyone’s weekend is going swell. Until next time- Eggman

Pre-trip Inspection:

A pre-trip inspection is a thorough inspection of the truck completed before driving for the first time each day.

Federal and state laws require that drivers inspect their vehicles. Federal and state inspectors also may inspect your vehicles. If they judge a vehicle to be unsafe, they will put it “out of service” until it is repaired.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar
I’m all ears. I do know that it’s recommended for new drivers to start with dry van. What can I say tho- I’m not following that recommendation if a company will allow me to start on a tank.

Eggman, you want to believe you're "all ears." I think you know you're not. You're dropping 10k to get a CDL. We tried like crazy to talk some economic sense into you, all to no avail. We realize you think you're taking the best approach, even though it's based on your own misguided ideas. But how in the world you expect us to believe you're "all ears" is hard to understand.

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You know we don't recommend that rookies start out pulling tankers, but it doesn't really concern you because "it's a serious interest of yours." You're terribly hard for me to understand. You are so patient about your schooling that you're willing to spend an inordinate amount of money and waste five months just to obtain a license that should only take a few short weeks to get. Yet you're so impatient to risk life and limb pulling tankers that you refuse to learn the basics before jumping into one of the more complex and decidedly more dangerous jobs available to professional drivers.

Other than your own declarations, you've never shown any evidence of being "all ears" as far as I can tell. If I was seriously interested in doing something (whether for hobby or sport, or career) that had inherent dangers involved for myself and those around me, I'd prepare myself properly. I'd take the necessary steps that would help me develop the skills needed to participate in the thing I desire. Incremental steps are crucial when training for high risk activities.

Claiming to be all ears, and then just basing all your decisions on personal biases and preferences is a folly that will haunt you one day. Personally I've given up on giving advice to you. I can't think of one thing yet where you acted on anything we've recommended. You seem to have read a few links we suggested, but never heeded the advice in them. What is it you want from us?

I guess it makes no difference to me, it's not like we're your Mom. But I've got to say you're about as frustrating as a headstrong rebellious child.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Here is a thread that got rather heated; culminating with an incredibly relevant reply from Raptor...you really should read it; as well as Brett’s reply, Old School and me...long thread, but worth a read...

Tanker Information

For the record; entry level drivers, should not be under a tank, especially smooth bore which covers the majority of food grade applications. I will emphatically advise you as others: cut your teeth with something more forgiving like dryvan or reefer. Be patient.

Like Old School, I don’t really care what you do, that is until, you are within 300 feet of me. Then I will care a lot.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Eggman's Comment
member avatar

-sigh-

It always feels like I’m getting friction from you guys.

I was already enrolled in this course before you guys “advised” me not to do it.

I chose this five month course because it gives me five months to get my arrangements in order- and also- don’t forget that it’s actually FREE. I get paid 1k a month to attend there as well. This scenario is better for me.

In regards to the tanking aspect- I asked for some insight- to get different opinions and point of views- but it seems we are still hung up on this cdl school decision I made.

I’ve read EVERY link shared. I’ve done tons of research- I am aware of the risks involved.

Here is the mentality it feels you guys are pushing. I’m gonna give you an example- but please don’t take this like I’m comparing apples to oranges, as I’m sure that will come up.

I’ve worked in kitchens for 13 years. 6 of which being in the Army (I’ve got tons of experience driving trucks there, btw). There is something Chefs usually like doing to new hires, especially if they are inexperienced. We toss them in the dish pit. That’s where the totem poll starts. In this case- it’s like-able to dry van. You have to learn the feel of the industry, learn the terminologies, learn how to approach people i.e. servers, customers, management, fellow cooks (disparchers, suppliers, cops, fellow truckers in the trucking world), and learn how to build up your stamina. It takes different levels of experience to handle certain equipment and cook certain foods (like driving certain equipment and certain loads).

I get it.

This is the first time I’ve actually asked for advise I believe- but disregard it. I’ll Continue to post my experiences here- not for you guys who seem to critique my words and dissect my actions, but for myself. I wanna document my experiences somewhere- and I figured Trucking Truth would be a great outlet for this.

If someone reads this and it helps them in some way- then great. If not, then great.

This isn’t intended to get anyone riled up- of offend anyone- or be disrespectful or come off as arrogant. It is, simply, what it is. My documented experiences of the choices I made- discussing my intents for the future. We all know that I am not the only person who is choosing this path.

However- I have taken your concerns to heart. I still have plenty of time to decide what company to pursue. Tons of research to be done- and lots of personal feelings to set aside. I certainly don’t wanna rush things- and kill someone. Until next time-

Eggman

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Eggman's Comment
member avatar

G-Town

Thanks for that thread. I appreciate the advice.

-Eggman

Old School's Comment
member avatar
It always feels like I’m getting friction from you guys.

Eggman, our purpose with this website is to teach people the best way to make a great start in a much misunderstood industry. It's an industry that has a long list of people who tried but failed. Fortunately we've made the short list of those who've not only had success, but continue to enjoy that success.

The sole reason you're getting pushback is that you continue demonstrating an approach that typically will turn out badly. Unfortunately, we feel a responsibility to point out those errors. This protects vulnerable new people coming in here, seeking valuable information on starting a trucking career, from being misled by your ideas.

We love having you share your experiences at school, but have to step in when you start giving questionable advice or speak of starting your career in what we consider to be an approach highly fraught with risk.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Eggman's Comment
member avatar

Thank you for you advice, Old School.

-Eggman

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