Incidents Keeping Me From Working

Topic 23867 | Page 2

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Brenda U.'s Comment
member avatar

Well I'm glad I came across this forum! I was recently involved in an incident at a rest stop. It was about 5 am and the lot was crowded. It was difficult to find a stop so ended up pulling into a spot that was very dark. All I needed to do was use the rest room and be on my way. Long story short, as I pulled out I came to realize too late that there was not enough room for my trailer. I ended up ripping the bumper and headlight out of the truck that was parked next to me. Is this a reportable incident and will that affect my license? I reported it to my company immediately, took lots of pictures.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

Well I'm glad I came across this forum! I was recently involved in an incident at a rest stop. It was about 5 am and the lot was crowded. It was difficult to find a stop so ended up pulling into a spot that was very dark. All I needed to do was use the rest room and be on my way. Long story short, as I pulled out I came to realize too late that there was not enough room for my trailer. I ended up ripping the bumper and headlight out of the truck that was parked next to me. Is this a reportable incident and will that affect my license? I reported it to my company immediately, took lots of pictures.

Brenda, This is what is called a preventable accident. While it won’t affect your CDL directly, it will most likely be listed on your DAC as a preventable accident. While it’s not a positive on your driving record, it’s certainly not the kiss of death. If you show a pattern of these, then of course, a company can use it as a reason to decline your application.

Hope this answers your question. Keep an eye on your wagon driver. Stay safe!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Brenda as Tim stated, it’s definitely a preventable and it definitely goes on your driving record. And definitely not the end of the world.

However of vital importance is critical self-evaluattion; what you can do differently to prevent this same type of accident from occurring in the future?

Mistakes are all part of the learning process and actually a valuable tool, if viewed as such. Learn from this, not dwelling on the consequences so much, but focused on improvement.

Good luck!

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi, you did better than i did on your first accident, i knocked an axle off my trailer! and 3 years later im stilll truckin along. So no, its not the kiss of death. Companies expect new drivers to make mistakes and learn from them.

what scared me was the possibility of it increasing my personal car insurance. i already paid a ton for a mustang gt in nj....but CMV accidents such as this wont affect your car insurance, yay!

Rest areas at night suck for new drivers.

For future reference remember FAT

F Fatality

A Ambulance

T Tow

If there is a death, injury, or either vehicle is towed, it is an accident. smaller things like scrapes or dents are incidents. each company can weigh things differently though. if you report a scrape to one company they might not care and it is no big deal. They may even remove it if you ask nicely and are planning to leave that company. Another company may be more strict and not remove it.

So breathe, calm, analyze it learn from it, then let it go. rehashing it can distract you and cause you to have another accident. THAT would be bad.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Brenda U.'s Comment
member avatar

Thank you!

double-quotes-start.png

Well I'm glad I came across this forum! I was recently involved in an incident at a rest stop. It was about 5 am and the lot was crowded. It was difficult to find a stop so ended up pulling into a spot that was very dark. All I needed to do was use the rest room and be on my way. Long story short, as I pulled out I came to realize too late that there was not enough room for my trailer. I ended up ripping the bumper and headlight out of the truck that was parked next to me. Is this a reportable incident and will that affect my license? I reported it to my company immediately, took lots of pictures.

double-quotes-end.png

Brenda, This is what is called a preventable accident. While it won’t affect your CDL directly, it will most likely be listed on your DAC as a preventable accident. While it’s not a positive on your driving record, it’s certainly not the kiss of death. If you show a pattern of these, then of course, a company can use it as a reason to decline your application.

Hope this answers your question. Keep an eye on your wagon driver. Stay safe!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Beth B.'s Comment
member avatar

Hope everybody had a Happy Thanksgiving...….sorry to have been away and not replied until now. So, two of my incidents were turning and two were backing up, and yes I do get out and look. I was good until I got out on my own with out my trainer. I thought I had swung out wide enough, and even though I kept looking I still hit something. Maybe I just underestimated my ability to get by the truck on the left. totally missed the illegally parked truck. Still looking for help. Thanks

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Beth B.

I don't know where you live and there are many companies that will hire, with accidents. And you may need more training. But if your on the east coast (time zone), you won't see this until tomorrow. Anyway, when you are making those right turns, I would rather get a ticket for going out into traffic than to hit something. You have to remember how long your trailer is, 53 feet, it doesn't take the long way around a corner. I'm not trying to beat you up here just a friendly reminder. Even if have to work locally at some mom-n-pop shop for a while to get you back to work. Even try construction companies, cement companies, farm to store companies. There is always a way.

Did your trainer feel it was time for you go solo? Then is when you should have told him/her, that you didn't feel comfortable yet. Even if he said then get another trainer, that would have been ok also. You made the decision to become a truck driver, you have to own that. Now all of here have made mistakes in our lives. No one is perfect, but we have to own up to our mistakes and try to learn by them. I don't remember how long ago these accidents were, but time will make these less a problem especially if you are working. You can do this, DON'T GIVE UP!

I didn't mean for this to be this long, but I also wanted you think of your options. Because they are out there. So go to the list of employing companies that are in the company reviews and call every recruiter that you can that is in your hiring area. They don't have to be a mega carrier. You may have to go back through some type of training. Be Patient, and it will come.

Raptor

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

It sounds like you've had 4 preventables in a very short time. I'd believe, if I were you, I'd ask for more training, provided they didn't fire you already.

Personal responsibility is a big deal and you can't blame not having a trainer with you. You say you get out and look, so it appears you didn't pay attention or learn from your mistakes. I'm not sure which companies might help you, but I'd just talk to as many as possible. You'll get a lot of "no's" but all you need is one "yes".

I sincerely wish I knew how to help you, other than getting more training. Driving isn't so much about learning to drive a truck, but more about learning how to drag around a 53' trailer without hitting anything.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Beth says:

So, two of my incidents were turning and two were backing up, and yes I do get out and look.

Yes, Getting Out And Looking is the right thing to do. Add to that your understanding on how the trailer moves, bends and turns as you push it backing and pull it forward.

The key to getting this understanding is in watching in your mirrors. Not just to make sure you don't crunch something, but to see how a 53 foot trailer bends in relation to your tractor. Learn that during daylight so at night your thinking will be better informed.

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