Why Do You Want To Become A Truck Driver???

Topic 23877 | Page 1

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Mike D.'s Comment
member avatar

After submitting my application to various sponsored CDL companies, I noticed that the question of "Why do you want to become a driver" came up often? Like there is some magical password or something? Caught off guard of course I really had no true answer. But seeing now, I realize that being a dedicated true professional driver seeking Top Tier status would be awesome!!!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Michael B.'s Comment
member avatar

I never encountered that question but would have answered honestly and quickly. You pay good money and provide me with a free house on wheels (I have chosen to get rid of my house and live in the truck). Lol...but not lol...

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

That was an easy question for me.....I wanted the adventure. I was also thrilled that the money was really good, but for me it was all about the adventure.

I'm always surprised at how few people seem to see trucking as a grand adventure. Every so often someone will mention that they've always dreamed of driving a truck since they were a little kid, but it's not very often. I hear people complain and nitpick over dumb things like the cleanliness of the hotel during training or that their trainer talks on the phone too much. I'm always scratching my head over the way people seem to miss the excitement of it all.

Mike D.'s Comment
member avatar

but for me it was all about the adventure.

Roger that!

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

After submitting my application to various sponsored CDL companies, I noticed that the question of "Why do you want to become a driver" came up often? Like there is some magical password or something? Caught off guard of course I really had no true answer. But seeing now, I realize that being a dedicated true professional driver seeking Top Tier status would be awesome!!!

I was caught off guard by that as well. I have so many answers to that, I couldn't pick one on the spot. After thinking about it, the best one is that I want to be paid for what I do, not what someone thinks I do. In other words, pay for performance.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

JoAnne EC's Comment
member avatar

I, personally, am ready for a complete change of career and think that trucking will be just the right amount of challenge to keep me on my toes and the right amount of adventure. I want to learn new things (continuously!), see new places and enjoy the beauty of the open road. I'm looking forward to the camaraderie too!

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I ask that very question of my trainees, actually. Their response will generally tell me whether I'm going to spend my valuable time training them or try to get them assigned to someone else.

Why? Training takes time and commitment. I generally make less money when I'm training a new driver. They're slow and generally inefficient. I typically earn more running solo without the headache of someone who isn't 100% committed.

But hey, someone who's committed to actually learning the job? They're a real pleasure to have as a guest on my truck.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Joe G.'s Comment
member avatar

I hear people complain and nitpick over dumb things like the cleanliness of the hotel during training or that their trainer talks on the phone too much. I'm always scratching my head over the way people seem to miss the excitement of it all.

One would have to be super dedicated to put up with a dirty hotel room...

Luke O.'s Comment
member avatar

I know this was a rhetorical question, but I personally have a variety of reasons running from the generic to the personal...

1. My financial situation at home has gone to utter ****. The jobs where Im from pay about 300$ a week on average, even skilled trades. On top of that, my car had been falling apart the last 6 months and finally broke down about a month ago. Its gotten to the point I couldn't support my family anymore locally. 2. I am not interested in your generic jobs and never have been. I dont find the idea of working in a windowless factory day in and day out doing the same routine day in and day out very appealing. Even the jobs that do pay good money that are like that, that's just not what I want to do with my life. 3. Up until about 7 years ago, I was always traveling and on the road. Some of it for work, some of it for pleasure. The last 7 years though, I got married, settled down, and focused on my future. However, on top of the financial difficulties Ive had, I also am fairly miserable most days living in the city and trying to live a city-based life. I grew up in a rural area, where You weren't bothered by heavy traffic, lots of noise, and huge crowds of people. Which is why Ive always been happiest when Im on the move driving down interstates and countryside highways and what not. I love my family dearly, but Im ****ing miserable living in the city and working a job in the city. 4. My grandpa used to be otr , my uncle was a train conductor, my cousin is a train conductor, and my other grandparents were forest fire watchers that lived in a shack up on a cliff in the mountains for 2 decades...I think the desire and wanderlust are in my blood. I was born to travel. 5. Lastly, I generally dislike people. I crave solitude. Just in general day to day life, I love being alone and having my own personal space where very few can intrude and bug me. If I could choose a time to be born, Id choose to be born back in our primitive hunter and gatherer days when humanity was still in the thousands and I could be the only sole human for hundreds of miles around. So I know I will have no trouble at all adjusting to solitude otr many miles away from home. 6. The adventure and the money, and the pride Im pretty sure I'll have to drive big trucks, while traveling, and making fairly good money, even despite the challenges, thats something I want almost more then anything.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I wanted to get away from co-workers, do my job, and be left alone. My friend told me he only deals with his "boss" dispatcher once a week and that sounded great to me.

I would have to word it in a more professional way. "I am an independent self started who feels trapped by the limitations of working with others. I wish to excel where others fail, and I want to allow dispatch to provide attention to those who are most in need."

Translation: Leave me the hell alone, and I'll do my damn job.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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