Just Introducing Myself, (pre Cdl Newbie) And Asking For Very Specific Advice...

Topic 23881 | Page 2

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Brett Aquila's Comment
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Thanks for the info, I'm taking a look at it, but how being locked into a contract is better than not being locked in one is beyond me, especially given the risk that if for any reason you get fired, the tuition is due in full. If they prorated it, I wouldnt be saying that, but anyway, I'll def look into that info with an open mind, thanks.

It will all make a lot more sense after you go through those materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
andhe78's Comment
member avatar

Thanks Big T and David. Ive been researching all day, then came across Maverick. I'm 100% going to drive for them and train with them. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=shEWNVbQ4gU. I'll start a CDL Training thread when I do.

Well that was quick, glad to see you put a whole day into making this decision.

So why maverick, what do you think they will offer you that Tmc and Roehl doesn’t?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Why would you pay $500 for an $80 physical?

I agree with the company sponsored training , and I think maverick is a perfectly acceptable choice, but so is Roehl. Personally, TMC's recruiter turned me off, but they are probably fine. There are many other acceptable choices as well.

As long as you are willing to work and aren't a screw up, being fired shouldn't be an issue, considering the shortage of drivers.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Personally, TMC's recruiter turned me off

You should definitely read this:

The Biggest Mistake New Drivers Make When Speaking With Recruiters

As long as you are willing to work and aren't a screw up, being fired shouldn't be an issue, considering the shortage of drivers.

I honestly believe the number one thing that causes more careers to fail right off the bat is that people believe that new drivers are somehow in demand. New drivers are not in demand. Safe, productive, high performing drivers, what we refer to as Top Tier Drivers, are in demand. In order to find those Top Tier drivers, companies will bring in new students off the street and give them a shot to prove they have what it takes to thrive in this industry. Unfortunately, the overwhelming majority of those who take a shot at this career either do not have what it takes or aren't willing to do what it takes to be a top performer. Most careers are very short lived. Many people never even manage to get their CDL , and many more never drive a truck solo a day in their lives.

So to everyone out there that's getting ready to start in this industry - please understand something - you are not in demand. You have no skills, no knowledge, no experience, and are incapable of helping a company service its customers or turn a profit. Why would you be in demand? You see what I'm saying?

You'll be given an opportunity to learn this trade and prove you have what it takes to be part of the team. If you go into this industry with no experience thinking you're somehow in demand and you're a free agent that can play the field looking for a company who is ready to treat you like a king, you're going to wind up on a bus home in no time. Trust me, it literally happens every single day at every major company out there.

Go in there and prove to them you're hard working and serious about becoming a top tier driver and give it everything you have. If you'll do that, everything will work out great. Just don't get confused about who is in demand and who is hoping for an opportunity to show that they are worthy of being part of the team.

They don't hand out participation trophies for poor performers in trucking, and they won't believe you have what it takes until you prove it. If you're cool with that and you're ready for that level of challenge then go for it. Get out there and make it happen. We'll do all we can to help you get there.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

CFI is headquartered in Joplin. You get your CDL and medical. Then they take you in. They pay your transportation, food and housing during school, now three weeks. Then four days orientation you are paid $100.00 cash. Then get paid 26 CPM while out with your trainer for 7500 miles. The contract is for 12 months and is prorated. Every month you work pays of 1/12th of $4000.00. At the end of that year, which goes by fast, you will have paid zero for training and have gone from 35 CPM to 42 CPM with several bump UPS in pay as you go. You can go from first day in Joplin to solo in as little as about 8 weeks. If you are a safe driver you should have no problems.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Brazen's Comment
member avatar

@andhe78 I wouldn't have been able to make that decision in a day if i hadnt already put weeks into becoming familiar with various schools, styles, reviews, and income potentials. Have you looked at Maverick's pay structure, commitment to their drivers, and pay stubs in youtube videos? The proof is there in writing. People are saying more good things about Maverick than any other I've come across, and that counts for a lot in my book. 60 - 65k per year isnt unrealistic for a first year driver off the street, for less than 2500 miles per week.

I actually have zero problem signing a 2 year contract with them, after not preferring contracts at all. THATS how good of an impression theyve left on me.

Matt W.'s Comment
member avatar

So to everyone out there that's getting ready to start in this industry - please understand something - you are not in demand. You have no skills, no knowledge, no experience, and are incapable of helping a company service its customers or turn a profit. Why would you be in demand? You see what I'm saying?

I'm not sure why reading that switched on a light in my head. It seems pretty obvious now. Thanks, Brett.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

Have you looked at Maverick's pay structure, commitment to their drivers, and pay stubs in youtube videos?

Can honestly say I hadn’t watched any YouTube videos about maverick, you’ve really opened my eyes to this awesome company. I have some videos to catch up on, but in what ways have you seen their commitment to the drivers?

I noticed your avatar, have you already been accepted by Maverick? Which division are you going to?

Turtle's Comment
member avatar
@andhe78 I wouldn't have been able to make that decision in a day if i hadnt already put weeks into becoming familiar with various schools, styles, reviews, and income potentials. Have you looked at Maverick's pay structure, commitment to their drivers, and pay stubs in youtube videos?

Well first, andhe78 actually drives for Maverick, so there's that.

Look, Maverick is a fantastic company. I don't think anybody here will knock them. But what we constantly strive to teach here is that the name on the door means nothing to your potential. All the internet research, peer reviews, and YouTube videos won't amount to a hill of beans if you don't do your job, and do it well. If you don't, Maverick will chew you up and spit you out just like any other company.

Again, Maverick is great. You can be very successful there. But don't base your decision off of some pay stub pictures you found on the internet. I'm on pace to make over 70k this year as a solo driver with Prime. With an average December I'll have it. That's a fact. I love them, and they love me. Does that mean my company is the best company to go to for a newbie? Absolutely not. Why? Because I'm the one that made that money. Prime didn't just give it to me. I earned it.

Wherever you go, it's all on you. If the internet teaches you anything, let that be it. Good luck.

Happy Thanksgiving all.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Doh! Andhe78, you replied while I was typing lol

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