Unable To Make The Back?

Topic 23952 | Page 1

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Jamie's Comment
member avatar

I just noticed this thread: Unsafe backing and Leaving truck and load at Terminal - only got me thinking about a question, the thread in general is kinda irrelevant other then for the question.

I've encountered some difficult backing situations either due to my lack of skills or just in general. But I got to thinking, what would you do if you simply don't have the skills to preforme the backing safely without hitting anything?

I know it's our job to find a way, but that was just a thought.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

andhe78's Comment
member avatar

I’ve wondered this too, and I don’t get into anywhere near the hairy situations you van drivers do. What helps me is knowing that if someone else got into the spot, it means there is a way to do it, just got to find it. This concern also keeps me practicing my skills regularly.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Fair question...

Better preparation is mandatory. Like I suggested in the other thread, use Google Maps satellite view to get first an overhead view, zoom-in to get a closer look and if need be get a street view. It’s a great tool, leverage it.

If it appears tight try to work out an approach ahead of time knowing that you’ll likely need some help once you arrive. Humbly, calmly and politely ask for assistance before hitting anything.

Above all else check the ego and G.O.A.L. as often as necessary.

Don’t shy away from close-quarter setup and backing situations. Handling this sort of thing is what makes you a better truck driver.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

The nastiest backing situation I had a couple months ago.. had a forklift load to deliver to Miami. My brokered back haul was for this scrap metal place off 147th or 148th St in OpaLocka. Weewww. Had to slide my tandems all the way forward and blindside back up on to this tiny scale meant for small straight trucks, and that's where they loaded me. It was the stuff nightmares are made of. My spotter was a non English speaking non CDL holding employee to boot. Problably one of the nastiest places I've been in a while. To make matters worse, my fuel stop was the "pilot" in Miami Gardens.. aka a BP gas station/metro PC's cell phone store/progressive insurance store in the middle of a teeny shopping center. I asked my dispatcher if he hated me or I had unknowingly done something to make him angry lol. I told him to only send drivers to those locations, if he didn't like them. He pulled them up on Google satellite and as a former driver himself, saw how bad it was and promptly removed those locations from our computer system. Win win.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Mik D.'s Comment
member avatar

I was backed into a dock in an office park ment for box trucks, not full Semis, curbs galore were hit getting in, im backed in and another truck shows up for opposite dock in front of me, and would not fit straight on, he then proceeded to back and hit the dock perfectly ending up like this😬😬😬never even though of doing this...

Mik D.'s Comment
member avatar

I was backed into a dock in an office park ment for box trucks, not full Semis, curbs galore were hit getting in, im backed in and another truck shows up for opposite dock in front of me, and would not fit straight on, he then proceeded to back and hit the dock perfectly ending up like this😬😬😬never even though of doing this...

Mik D.'s Comment
member avatar

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Mik D.'s Comment
member avatar

0449120001543691360.jpg

Old School's Comment
member avatar

I'll bet he got done and out of there before you too. That's what experience will do for ya! smile.gif

Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

If the rig can fit, there is always a way even if very difficult. usually, the solution is to take as many get-out-and-looks as necessary, even if it is 457,393 times

I just noticed this thread: Unsafe backing and Leaving truck and load at Terminal - only got me thinking about a question, the thread in general is kinda irrelevant other then for the question.

I've encountered some difficult backing situations either due to my lack of skills or just in general. But I got to thinking, what would you do if you simply don't have the skills to preforme the backing safely without hitting anything?

I know it's our job to find a way, but that was just a thought.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

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