How Many Times Roughly Do You Have To Stop And Chain Up Your Truck Annually?

Topic 24129 | Page 2

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Chuck S.'s Comment
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You will find a wide variety of opinions when talking about chains on this site. I can say from all my years on the road running mostly the western states, that it's really hit or miss. some years i chained up more then others, but an average of maybe 7 to 10 times what i learned though ... if you time it right and hit those chain up areas about noon-ish sometimes you could catch a break on the chain laws

just sayin

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Todd Holmes's Comment
member avatar

Are you seeing it? This job, while not a perfect fit for everyone, is not as physically demanding, IS financially rewarding and NOT impossible to do.

Most reputable companies will treat you well and don’t expect you to kill yourself to do your job.

And just remember; the longer you linger, the longer it’ll take before you’re eligible for benefits (unless your company enrolls you immediately) like 401(k).

Thanks, Steve.

It's now apparent that chains are the least of a driver's worries. Any decent freight outfit should have the drivers shut down whenever chains are required.

I won't worry about chains any more. If they cover chains in CDL training, fine. I'm sure there will be much in-class lecture on foul-weather driving. My rule in nasty conditions: take it slow and low or park it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
if you time it right and hit those chain up areas about noon-ish sometimes you could catch a break on the chain laws

What does that mean?

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
JoAnne EC's Comment
member avatar

My company's policy is if chains are required, we are to park, or only chain just to get to a safe parking location.

That sounds like a damn good policy! I have a friend who's been out there trucking in the snow storm and he sends me pix and it looks TERRIFYING! I don't even like driving my four-wheeler in the snow. I learned how to drive at 16 in the snow (in Maine) but people out here in Oregon have no idea how to drive in it. I avoid at all costs! =)

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I'm from one of the heaviest snow belt regions of the country outside of Buffalo, NY and I can drive in the snow as well as anyone. I never put on a set of chains in 15 years of driving.

What I think a lot of people fail to realize is that you're wasting an enormous amount of time, taking huge risks, and creating tons of stress for yourself by trying to drive through horrible conditions. Not only that, but often times the best weather you'll ever find will follow a big storm. So if you'll park it in bad conditions and wait it out a little bit you'll almost certainly have sunny skies before long.

Remember, you're not in this to make as much money as you can in the short term. You're in it for the long term. Parking the truck when conditions are dangerous and running hard when the conditions are good will not only be safer but it will also be more efficient and save you a ton of stress. Conserving mental energy and focusing on safety is critical for the long term career of every trucker. Don't be shortsighted. Make decisions that make sense for the long term.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

I'm from one of the heaviest snow belt regions of the country outside of Buffalo, NY and I can drive in the snow as well as anyone. I never put on a set of chains in 15 years of driving.

What I think a lot of people fail to realize is that you're wasting an enormous amount of time, taking huge risks, and creating tons of stress for yourself by trying to drive through horrible conditions. Not only that, but often times the best weather you'll ever find will follow a big storm. So if you'll park it in bad conditions and wait it out a little bit you'll almost certainly have sunny skies before long.

Remember, you're not in this to make as much money as you can in the short term. You're in it for the long term. Parking the truck when conditions are dangerous and running hard when the conditions are good will not only be safer but it will also be more efficient and save you a ton of stress. Conserving mental energy and focusing on safety is critical for the long term career of every trucker. Don't be shortsighted. Make decisions that make sense for the long term.

Well said Brett.

Dave (formerly known as K's Comment
member avatar

Well, I passed up an opportunity to chain up to get across Snoqualmai. Passing the TA @ exit 34 on I-90 I thought to myself, really should just stop and check conditions. I didn't listen to that little inner voice. Get a little closer and the electronic billboard says traction tires advised. Get even a little closer and they change it to chains required. I stop in the chain up area and check the WSDOT app and cameras. Look at the pass info a second time then bring up Google maps. Disaster averted, there is an exit (47) that I can do a two point u-turn and head back to the TA.

Get there and luck out, there's parking! Send a message to the night FM telling him what's up then go get me some Popeye's.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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