Advice On Making Tight Right Turns

Topic 24372 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Stephanie K.'s Comment
member avatar

I have to go to a shipper and in my directions it says to make a tight right turn. I have only come across one really tight turn and I didn't make it. I had to find a way to turn around and come from the other way. I have only 2 hours to make it to this shipper (they gave me the assignment 12 hours before I had to be there and I still had to take my 10 he break) that is 105 miles away so I have no time to get it wrong. Any advice would help.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

First check out the scene using ‘satellite view’ on Google maps; you’re looking for an alternative to making that right turn. If none exists, I’d tackle it this way: approach the turn very slowly, slower than usual. Creep as far left as you can get in your lane, without impeding traffic traveling in the other lane/ opposite direction. You may even be in the other lane, just don’t block it entirely. Before you turn right, steer your tractor to the left, keeping eyes on your driver’s side mirror so you don’t hit anyone, then turn right. This should give you enough room to make the turn. Go slowly, so everybody has the opportunity to see what you’re doing and will hopefully give you time and space to complete the turn. Don’t forget to check your passenger side mirror in case someone tries to squeeze past you on that side. Good luck!

Pete B.'s Comment
member avatar

When you take your 10 again, read up and/or Youtube “buttonhook turns;” it may help you prepare for your next tight right turn.

Stephanie K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks. Will do. Would it help to use my flashers or no?

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I basically pull as far forward as possible crossing the intersection, blow the air horn if need be, then turn right into the on coming traffic....which is why it is best to blow ur horn...stay in that opposing trafic lane and watch your trailer the swing back.

if you need to, allow that traffic to cross the intersection first to get out of your way and give you room.

remember what is tight for some is easy for others so it may not truly be tight to you. ;)

Stephanie K.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks. I have been having nightmares about it all night. After that right turn off Gravel Hill Road going to DHL in PA. I am gun shy

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

When in doubt hook it! "Button hook". I've been to some pretty small towns where it seems it'd be impossible to make some of the turns, which it was if it wasn't for me button hooking it. Normally I wait until traffic is clear on the road I'm turning on and the other lane, then swing left as far as I think I need before coming back right, be making sure to keep the turn as wide as possible or need to be.

While I was in school, they actually mentioned how a buttonhook would never be used according to the manual. My first day in the truck at Schneider, they had us doing a buttonhook since its the only way to make some of the really tight turns.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I have had turns I had to go all the way to the curb to clear. And definitely buttonhook.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

The buttonhook was the first thing Wolding taught me as well, and said forget what school said about never doing it. Just keep watching that right lane and your tandems.

They also said take as many lanes as you need to make the turn.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

You've gotten great advice already. I was say for starters, just relax. Time is on your side and so is the fact that you're super huge so everyone will see you.

Take your time. As you approach the intersection go super slow and stay back from the intersection far enough that you have plenty of room left to swing real wide. You want to wait for traffic to give you an opportunity to go. If you have to stop for a moment and put your 4-ways on while you wait for traffic to clear then do so. No big deal.

Once you have a chance then just use all the room available. Use more than you think you may need. Just watch your mirrors at all times and be aware of all of the traffic around you.

Once you start the the maneuver you really have to take control of the road. It only lasts 30 seconds. No one is going to die of a heart attack if they have to wait for you to make a turn. Use all the room you need to make it easily and safely. Once you're out of the way people can do what they want for the rest of their lives. So don't be shy about making them wait a second. Don't worry about what they think. No one gets up in the morning and asks you to approve their plans for the day, so they're not too worried about what you think of them either. That's what gets people nervous. They don't want to hold anyone up or make them mad. You have to put that completely out of your mind and do whatever you have to do to get the job done safely. If that means someone has to wait a minute then so be it. They're adults. They need to be able to handle 30 seconds of inconvenience.

Be patient. Wait for traffic to clear as much as possible and then take control of the intersection and do whatever you need to do to get through there safely. If someone has to wait or they have to back up to get out of your way then that's how it goes. Don't sweat it. You'll make people have to back up out of your way 100 times in your career. That's life. Sometimes you have to wait for others, sometimes they have to wait for you. It's nothing to get worked up about.

It's going to go just fine. Don't sweat it.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More