Anti Gel Additive

Topic 24380 | Page 1

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DallaStrong's Comment
member avatar

How anti gel treatment do I need to add to 2/100 gallon fuel tanks and how often

Thanks

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Depends on the brand. That info should be right on the bottle.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

It also depends on outside temps.

Prime promotes Power Diesel brand and dies not recommend Howes. Their truck so i put in what they want. Power diesel has small bottles that is 100 gals each bottle. their large bottles are for 250 gals.

be sure to add more if below zero..the bottle will say. Also add to the reefer if you have one.

Its better to add too much than not enough.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Brian's Comment
member avatar

I was literally just about to post a similar thread. I'm curious Rainy did Prime ever mention why they don't want Howe's used? I always thought that was a good brand.

It also depends on outside temps.

Prime promotes Power Diesel brand and dies not recommend Howes. Their truck so i put in what they want. Power diesel has small bottles that is 100 gals each bottle. their large bottles are for 250 gals.

be sure to add more if below zero..the bottle will say. Also add to the reefer if you have one.

Its better to add too much than not enough.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

They said it doesnt work and they tow too many trucks that use it.

I know 2 people who drive Petes and both gelled while using it, yet 1 guy who drives a FL uses nothing else and never had an issue. So it there some material in the trucks that makes a difference?

Prime sells a brand at the terminals to the lease ops, and i thought that was the reason....but they only charge like $3 or $5 per 250 gallon bottle, as opposed to the $15 bottles at the truck stops, so it makes business sense to buy from Prime anyway.

It could be that lease ops are cheap and dont put enough in. company drivers get it free and are probably more liberal. Maybe they arent realizing the below zero makes a difference and they dont add more. I dont know. I posted a winter tips thread years ago and got put in my place over it. Someone went on and on why Howes is great. However, when i researched it, they had jist changed their formula at the time. So perhaps it had issues with a particular forumla.

It could be new drivers who forgot to add some then blamed the product? who knows. i was told not to buy it, they pay for it. If your company says use Howes then use Howes.

I had a lease op trainer who never out coolant in his truck. He kept saying "next truck stop". I drove into a shipper and the truck was smoking and making noise. The guard said "Your truck is about to explode!" Yeah well....it wasnt my truck so i didnt care.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Its better to add too much than not enough.

Explain that logic, please?

Brian's Comment
member avatar

Add to little and you risk gelling. Add to much and.. Well I've heard multiple times that nothing happens from adding more than you should. It even says on the back of Howe's bottle that overuse is not harmful. That's what she's referring too.

Its better to add too much than not enough.

Explain that logic, please?

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

What I'm getting at is why waste it? If it calls for 12 ounces for 95 gallons, adding 24 ounces is not twice the protection, it's a waste of money. If a fleet has half the drivers doing that every three days for four months, that's a hefty dent. That's right up there with taking 6 asprin to get rid of a headache faster.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

PlanB's Comment
member avatar

It actually is greater protection. Anti gel lowers the freezing point of the fuel. The more you add the lower the freezing point.

If your at freezing point 1 bottle should be fine. If you're down below 0°F it would be wise to add more antigel. One bottle may not be enough.

This is all explained on the bottle.

What I'm getting at is why waste it? If it calls for 12 ounces for 95 gallons, adding 24 ounces is not twice the protection, it's a waste of money. If a fleet has half the drivers doing that every three days for four months, that's a hefty dent. That's right up there with taking 6 asprin to get rid of a headache faster.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Dan67's Comment
member avatar

I use the Lucas Oil Anti-Gel 64 oz jug. Pour half into each tank. One bottle treats up to 300 gallons down to -10F, use a second bottle for -10 to -40F. Had no issues with it and the engine and apu start fine with it. Just remember to add it before you fuel so that it mixes better. Fuel will start to wax below 32 degrees and gel at 17 degrees.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

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